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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    228
    Style
    BJJ, CSW
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What I love is how they say you don't need to practice or train for years, yet when they talk about sport fighters their critisism is that you fight like you train.

    If that's true and you don't train that would mean you can't fight.
    Last edited by The_Dude73; 12/18/2003 8:31am at .

  2. #12
    Community Corrections Officer supporting member
    Matt W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    3,621
    Style
    Judo, TKD BB
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey, people can call it "marketing" and "hype", but let's face it, it's LIES. Plain and simple. And telling people that they can "Annihilate ANY Violent Physical Attack" by watching a few videos or attending a seminar is not only a lie, but a dangerous one. It is the essence of bullshido. And I find it hard to believe that anything that might actually work in the "style" can't be found elsewhere, without the BS (and probably better too).

    Regards,
    Matt

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    228
    Style
    BJJ, CSW
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Matt is correct. All the signs are there. The whole "we're too dangerous for sport" angle is one thing.

    The only difference here is that they insist they are NOT a martial art and wrap themselves up in pseudo-science.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    20,890
    Style
    Shi Ja Quan
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I will say only this about SCARS:
    Its principles, what makes it unique: the "offensive mindset", the "autokinematic response", the "compression" techniques, the way they deal with blunt and edges weapons, the way they deal with firearms, are not "new", you can find these things in many Martial Arts.
    BUT, SCARS may be the only "system" the incorporates them ALL.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Posts
    597
    Style
    Shnizzletodawizzle
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You have attended SCARS Level One and Level Two 30-hour camps as well as other seminars we have provided for you. Now, because of your physical and financial commitment to us in the past, we are prepared to offer you advanced training.
    Level one costs anywhere from $5000 to $1550 depending if you were trained by the "man" himself, Jerry Peterson, or one of his instructors. Level two was almost $3000. Those of you that have recently attended a Level 2 have been told the special price for your loyalty. Those L-2 graduates that have not been contacted, don't speculate what it might cost, just read to the end and call 1-480-705-9786


    So lets see at least $5000 for level 1 which is 30 hours... that's $166.67 an hour for group lessons. Plus you have to travel to them.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Posts
    1,785
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Nice work if you can get it . . . :)

  7. #17
    Jason Statham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2
    Style
    Military Combatives
    -1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    SCARS Level 1 Civilian 30 Hour Camp Review

    SCARS Level 1 30 Hour Civilian Training Camp Review

    This is a positive review of my firsthand experience with it.

    I have been interested in SCARS since 1997, after coming across advertisements in magazines. The ads were very appealing, maybe some hype and exaggeration mixed with facts.? Great marketing. Purchased HCS, then went on to Edged Weapons and Firearm Disarmament, Autokinematics and Body Weapons. Finally got into the Lethal Series, the list goes on, etc. Purchased and read everything I could about SCARS. In the early 2000’s read online all of the perceived pro’s and con’s of this system. I have read it all and will not rehash any of that here. Research it all for yourself, there were some interesting and valid points made by others. Did a short stint of 6 months with Seidokan Aikido because I wanted to become a Steven Seagal wannabe. Didn’t walk away with anything tangible, but I did enjoy the experience of the dojo, wearing a GI and purchasing some VHS Aikido material from Cool Rain Productions.

    I am a career law enforcement guy and am familiar with defensive tactics concepts and training. I was looking for something that had a quick learning curve with some bone crunching options in the event of a close quarter encounter where I could not get to my sidearm. I wanted something to be able to effectively deal with active aggression. SCARS seemed to be the answer. I consider myself to be an amateur. I was slated to go to a Level 1 civilian trainer’s camp in 1999, but something came up financially and I did not go. For years I watched the videos and in 2013 I purchased some training mats and a BOB trainer and coaxed a relative and a co-worker to come over to my house and do some training. In the Spring of 2016 the finances were available and I signed up for the October 2016 three day event in Denver, Colorado. The course is advertised as a 3 day 30 hour training event. Friday through Sunday with a cost of $2500.00. You are responsible for your own travel expenses, they will book the hotel room for you. You will be able to take a shuttle from the Denver Airport to the hotel so a rental vehicle is not necessary. One you check in the front desk they will give you an envelope from the SCARS staff with more specific information for your stay. Accomodations are very nice, I do not want to give location specifics as not to compromise any safety or security issues for anyone. If you want to know these specifics then you will have to sign up, pay and attend.

    Friday is 0700-1700 hrs. with a 90 minute lunch break.

    Saturday is 0700-1900 hrs. with a 90 minute lunch break.

    Sunday is 0700-1100 hrs.

    I am 48 years old and am in respectable physical condition and am from Michigan. The elevation above sea level for Denver is one mile above sea level. This was 5 times higher than my own state. I noticed that about three hours into the training I was breathing very hard and was thirsty, more so than I should have been. I felt a little light headed and nauseas. Appears that I was experiencing some high altitude sickness. They had water in the banquet room where we trained, I started drinking like a camel for the entire three days and noted I was barely keeping ahead of the dehydration curve. Each technique eventually ends you or your partner on the ground, I made life easier for myself by rolling off of the mat gently and in a controlled fashion. Jumping off the mat like a jack in the box will only wear you out. You need to pace yourself. Learn to relax and not hold your breath during the exercises will also help you maintain a good balance and stamina throughout the entire process. Remaining calm also keeps you from telegraphing to your opponent your next move. I made it a point to stretch thoroughly in my room each morning to help with the muscle soreness. On day two one of the instructors put all of us through a mid-day “range of motion” stretching drill that was very good. There were 17 students in our class, five of us were new, the remaining 12 were returning SCARS students who belonged to their Knights program, which costs about $5000.00 dollars a year and gives them the opportunity to train with them four times a year. That’s not for me, both financially and physically. Jerry and Blake Peterson are obviously your core instructors, the remaining 12 Knight’s staff also rotated through us new students while performing techniques. Their experience levels ranged from one year to one gentleman who had been coming regularly since 2004. I reviewed all of my SCARS videos prior to going, emails from SCARS staff indicated that the training would consist of approx..25% of known material from the tapes and the remaining 75% would be stuff never seen before. They also recommended reviewing the Navy Seal trainers tape if you had it. My opinion was that it was exactly the other way around, 75% known techniques from the videos and 25% not on them. Not a problem, I just wanted to be there and train in SCARS techniques with like -minded people and have the opportunity to meet the Peterson’s.

    The first morning was a short introduction of staff, each one of the new guys was able to stand up and give as much or as little personal information about themselves as they wanted. You had to sign off on the waivers of liability and other paperwork stating that you were in good enough physical shape as noted by a physician to endure the course. Special note was a section that stated you would only be given up to three warnings from staff if you lost your temper on the mat and did something foolish or unsafe. Violation of these rules meant ejection from the course or their option of using an equal amount of physical force on you as reciprocation. Fortunately, this was never a problem from anyone in the class. Everyone seemed to bring a white towel from their hotel room with them to class, you will need it due to perspiration. I brought three pairs of 5.11 type fatigue pants, t-shirts and several pairs of clean socks with me. Most people did the same, with the exception of one guy who wore shorts. I would not do that, looks a little too informal and also won’t provide any protection to your knees and legs rubbing on the mats. Everybody was clean, no smelly socks, bad breath, or any hints of nicotine usage. They also had some Ibuprofen on the tables next to the water. I took some both days for the heck of it, you will be getting sore and bruised during this course. I would recommend doing a fair share of cardio before you go and some leg squats just using your own body weight. Over the course of a couple of days you have to get yourself off of the mat and get ready for more techniques, multiple dozens of times. That wears you out. The course is advertised as 30 hours, it is more like 25 total, once you subtract the lunch breaks and lecture time, you are probably getting about 16 hours of actual mat time. I’m not complaining, that was more than adequate to get a good grasp on the techniques, while listening to Jerry Peterson talk it was nice to catch your breath and recuperate from all of the physical exertion. His points could have been made much quicker, but I certainly was not going to point that out and have to go back out on the mat prematurely for more “ass” beating time.

    Jerry and Blake Peterson are great people. They are professional, patient and kind. They are experts at their tradecraft. If you needed to see a technique again, they would do it and were never rude or condescending. A couple of times if you and your partner were slow on getting the technique delivered the failing group had to drop and do a set of 20 push-ups. I won that prize two times in a row, not a big deal but it helped me get with the program a little quicker. Jerry Peterson talked about different experiences in his life that related to how and why SCARS works, the examples he used were not the typical war story bullshit that so many people talk about to try and impress you. These guys were genuine and authentic. I was more pleased and impressed than I thought I would be. They also did a good job of controlling the class and keeping everyone on track. We were never sidelined with the typical “what if and that” rhetoric seen in most trainings. Don’t hesitate with your adversary and apply your techniques with force and precision. There was no coffee or donut tray sitting over in the corner. Each day we all had breakfast and lunch together. Some days the new guys sat together, other days you sat with Jerry and Blake and the Knights staff. I ate sensibly, but wish I would have stuck a couple of protein energy bars in my pockets in between the morning and afternoon lunch break.

    Friday evening you have a formal dinner with everyone after class. It was very high end. You also do a special ceremony with the Peterson’s involving a couple of toasts with some Chivas Regal. I’m not giving you the specifics, because you will have to go and experience it yourself. Jerry Peterson is a confident man, with a healthy ego that deserves respect both as a human being, successful business man and warrior. He is also very spiritual, and he will make that point clear right up front. Each of the instructors were quality people. They insisted on safety and slowing the techniques down, emphasizing always hitting your targets. You paired off initially with the new students eventually rotating in with the more experienced ones. You did one on one fighting and then moved into larger groups involving multi -fighting scenarios. You were taught to relax, not hold your breath, concentrate on eliminating each opponent first as you rotated through your respective groups. If you made the mistake of rotating into the center of your group, you got taken out and ended up on the ground. We all trained smartly.

    Be careful on sizing your opponents up, appearances are deceiving. It was interesting to see how different levels of physical fitness played out on the mat. I could see guys who were a little pudgy looking were whipping people around that seemed in far better shape than them. One guy had asthma, which affected him until he was able to get the proper inhaler that he needed. Do not underestimate people, there are people walking around in life with skill sets that are dangerous. You will do unarmed combat, then move to knives, batons, handguns and shotguns. You will also be doing some throws, it was neat to be training on those green Norbert mats that you see in the videos. Those are of exceptional quality and really absorbed the falls quite nicely. The airsoft rounds hurt, actually less than the rubber bullets they will use on you while doing handgun disarm techniques. The flak vest training with full power kicks and punches will bruise you, but was interesting. I did cut one of my fingers during the handgun disarm section, but it was not a big deal. I brought some band-aids with me that I kept in my room. One of the senior students accidentally broke one of his toes during an exercise in the shoot house. Minor stuff, things happen. I was glad that I did not get hurt and have to explain to my employer how and why this happened. This was a personal journey for myself that I am only going to share with a few people back at home. The only thing we did not cover was some of their compression series ground fighting. I am sure if I would have brought it up it would have been provided.

    On your last day you are given an 8 ½ by 11 inch certificate of completion in a nice black folder and a 1 ¾ challenge coin. Both are very well done items and have a professional aura about them. You can be proud of them as you earned and paid for it. They will also do a quick interview with you both on day one and day three which is video and audio recorded. I got my money’s worth, no doubt and am glad that I attended. I give the whole course an A+ and felt all of the techniques were realistic and useable. Everything was professional, and I did not have to put up with any Grandmaster, Wang Chung, Oh Sensei, praying mantis, flying grasshopper, sitting in a seiza position until my legs are numb, dragon breath bullshit!

    Thanks for reading, hope it helps someone make a choice whether this is for them or not.

  8. #18
    BKR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
    Posts
    16,824
    Style
    Kodokan Judo/BJJ
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Jason Statham View Post
    SCARS Level 1 30 Hour Civilian Training Camp Review

    This is a positive review of my firsthand experience with it.

    I have been interested in SCARS since 1997, after coming across advertisements in magazines. The ads were very appealing, maybe some hype and exaggeration mixed with facts.? Great marketing. Purchased HCS, then went on to Edged Weapons and Firearm Disarmament, Autokinematics and Body Weapons. Finally got into the Lethal Series, the list goes on, etc. Purchased and read everything I could about SCARS. In the early 2000’s read online all of the perceived pro’s and con’s of this system. I have read it all and will not rehash any of that here. Research it all for yourself, there were some interesting and valid points made by others. Did a short stint of 6 months with Seidokan Aikido because I wanted to become a Steven Seagal wannabe. Didn’t walk away with anything tangible, but I did enjoy the experience of the dojo, wearing a GI and purchasing some VHS Aikido material from Cool Rain Productions.

    I am a career law enforcement guy and am familiar with defensive tactics concepts and training. I was looking for something that had a quick learning curve with some bone crunching options in the event of a close quarter encounter where I could not get to my sidearm. I wanted something to be able to effectively deal with active aggression. SCARS seemed to be the answer. I consider myself to be an amateur. I was slated to go to a Level 1 civilian trainer’s camp in 1999, but something came up financially and I did not go. For years I watched the videos and in 2013 I purchased some training mats and a BOB trainer and coaxed a relative and a co-worker to come over to my house and do some training. In the Spring of 2016 the finances were available and I signed up for the October 2016 three day event in Denver, Colorado. The course is advertised as a 3 day 30 hour training event. Friday through Sunday with a cost of $2500.00. You are responsible for your own travel expenses, they will book the hotel room for you. You will be able to take a shuttle from the Denver Airport to the hotel so a rental vehicle is not necessary. One you check in the front desk they will give you an envelope from the SCARS staff with more specific information for your stay. Accomodations are very nice, I do not want to give location specifics as not to compromise any safety or security issues for anyone. If you want to know these specifics then you will have to sign up, pay and attend.

    Friday is 0700-1700 hrs. with a 90 minute lunch break.

    Saturday is 0700-1900 hrs. with a 90 minute lunch break.

    Sunday is 0700-1100 hrs.

    I am 48 years old and am in respectable physical condition and am from Michigan. The elevation above sea level for Denver is one mile above sea level. This was 5 times higher than my own state. I noticed that about three hours into the training I was breathing very hard and was thirsty, more so than I should have been. I felt a little light headed and nauseas. Appears that I was experiencing some high altitude sickness. They had water in the banquet room where we trained, I started drinking like a camel for the entire three days and noted I was barely keeping ahead of the dehydration curve. Each technique eventually ends you or your partner on the ground, I made life easier for myself by rolling off of the mat gently and in a controlled fashion. Jumping off the mat like a jack in the box will only wear you out. You need to pace yourself. Learn to relax and not hold your breath during the exercises will also help you maintain a good balance and stamina throughout the entire process. Remaining calm also keeps you from telegraphing to your opponent your next move. I made it a point to stretch thoroughly in my room each morning to help with the muscle soreness. On day two one of the instructors put all of us through a mid-day “range of motion” stretching drill that was very good. There were 17 students in our class, five of us were new, the remaining 12 were returning SCARS students who belonged to their Knights program, which costs about $5000.00 dollars a year and gives them the opportunity to train with them four times a year. That’s not for me, both financially and physically. Jerry and Blake Peterson are obviously your core instructors, the remaining 12 Knight’s staff also rotated through us new students while performing techniques. Their experience levels ranged from one year to one gentleman who had been coming regularly since 2004. I reviewed all of my SCARS videos prior to going, emails from SCARS staff indicated that the training would consist of approx..25% of known material from the tapes and the remaining 75% would be stuff never seen before. They also recommended reviewing the Navy Seal trainers tape if you had it. My opinion was that it was exactly the other way around, 75% known techniques from the videos and 25% not on them. Not a problem, I just wanted to be there and train in SCARS techniques with like -minded people and have the opportunity to meet the Peterson’s.

    The first morning was a short introduction of staff, each one of the new guys was able to stand up and give as much or as little personal information about themselves as they wanted. You had to sign off on the waivers of liability and other paperwork stating that you were in good enough physical shape as noted by a physician to endure the course. Special note was a section that stated you would only be given up to three warnings from staff if you lost your temper on the mat and did something foolish or unsafe. Violation of these rules meant ejection from the course or their option of using an equal amount of physical force on you as reciprocation. Fortunately, this was never a problem from anyone in the class. Everyone seemed to bring a white towel from their hotel room with them to class, you will need it due to perspiration. I brought three pairs of 5.11 type fatigue pants, t-shirts and several pairs of clean socks with me. Most people did the same, with the exception of one guy who wore shorts. I would not do that, looks a little too informal and also won’t provide any protection to your knees and legs rubbing on the mats. Everybody was clean, no smelly socks, bad breath, or any hints of nicotine usage. They also had some Ibuprofen on the tables next to the water. I took some both days for the heck of it, you will be getting sore and bruised during this course. I would recommend doing a fair share of cardio before you go and some leg squats just using your own body weight. Over the course of a couple of days you have to get yourself off of the mat and get ready for more techniques, multiple dozens of times. That wears you out. The course is advertised as 30 hours, it is more like 25 total, once you subtract the lunch breaks and lecture time, you are probably getting about 16 hours of actual mat time. I’m not complaining, that was more than adequate to get a good grasp on the techniques, while listening to Jerry Peterson talk it was nice to catch your breath and recuperate from all of the physical exertion. His points could have been made much quicker, but I certainly was not going to point that out and have to go back out on the mat prematurely for more “ass” beating time.

    Jerry and Blake Peterson are great people. They are professional, patient and kind. They are experts at their tradecraft. If you needed to see a technique again, they would do it and were never rude or condescending. A couple of times if you and your partner were slow on getting the technique delivered the failing group had to drop and do a set of 20 push-ups. I won that prize two times in a row, not a big deal but it helped me get with the program a little quicker. Jerry Peterson talked about different experiences in his life that related to how and why SCARS works, the examples he used were not the typical war story bullshit that so many people talk about to try and impress you. These guys were genuine and authentic. I was more pleased and impressed than I thought I would be. They also did a good job of controlling the class and keeping everyone on track. We were never sidelined with the typical “what if and that” rhetoric seen in most trainings. Don’t hesitate with your adversary and apply your techniques with force and precision. There was no coffee or donut tray sitting over in the corner. Each day we all had breakfast and lunch together. Some days the new guys sat together, other days you sat with Jerry and Blake and the Knights staff. I ate sensibly, but wish I would have stuck a couple of protein energy bars in my pockets in between the morning and afternoon lunch break.

    Friday evening you have a formal dinner with everyone after class. It was very high end. You also do a special ceremony with the Peterson’s involving a couple of toasts with some Chivas Regal. I’m not giving you the specifics, because you will have to go and experience it yourself. Jerry Peterson is a confident man, with a healthy ego that deserves respect both as a human being, successful business man and warrior. He is also very spiritual, and he will make that point clear right up front. Each of the instructors were quality people. They insisted on safety and slowing the techniques down, emphasizing always hitting your targets. You paired off initially with the new students eventually rotating in with the more experienced ones. You did one on one fighting and then moved into larger groups involving multi -fighting scenarios. You were taught to relax, not hold your breath, concentrate on eliminating each opponent first as you rotated through your respective groups. If you made the mistake of rotating into the center of your group, you got taken out and ended up on the ground. We all trained smartly.

    Be careful on sizing your opponents up, appearances are deceiving. It was interesting to see how different levels of physical fitness played out on the mat. I could see guys who were a little pudgy looking were whipping people around that seemed in far better shape than them. One guy had asthma, which affected him until he was able to get the proper inhaler that he needed. Do not underestimate people, there are people walking around in life with skill sets that are dangerous. You will do unarmed combat, then move to knives, batons, handguns and shotguns. You will also be doing some throws, it was neat to be training on those green Norbert mats that you see in the videos. Those are of exceptional quality and really absorbed the falls quite nicely. The airsoft rounds hurt, actually less than the rubber bullets they will use on you while doing handgun disarm techniques. The flak vest training with full power kicks and punches will bruise you, but was interesting. I did cut one of my fingers during the handgun disarm section, but it was not a big deal. I brought some band-aids with me that I kept in my room. One of the senior students accidentally broke one of his toes during an exercise in the shoot house. Minor stuff, things happen. I was glad that I did not get hurt and have to explain to my employer how and why this happened. This was a personal journey for myself that I am only going to share with a few people back at home. The only thing we did not cover was some of their compression series ground fighting. I am sure if I would have brought it up it would have been provided.

    On your last day you are given an 8 ½ by 11 inch certificate of completion in a nice black folder and a 1 ¾ challenge coin. Both are very well done items and have a professional aura about them. You can be proud of them as you earned and paid for it. They will also do a quick interview with you both on day one and day three which is video and audio recorded. I got my money’s worth, no doubt and am glad that I attended. I give the whole course an A+ and felt all of the techniques were realistic and useable. Everything was professional, and I did not have to put up with any Grandmaster, Wang Chung, Oh Sensei, praying mantis, flying grasshopper, sitting in a seiza position until my legs are numb, dragon breath bullshit!

    Thanks for reading, hope it helps someone make a choice whether this is for them or not.
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...p?t=807&page=2

    http://hockscombatforum.com/index.php?topic=198.0

    http://combative.www6.50megs.com/scars.htm
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

    "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

  9. #19
    Ded Moroz's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    862
    Style
    Combat Sambo | Pramek
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm honestly surprised SCARS is still around

  10. #20
    BKR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bonners Ferry, Idaho
    Posts
    16,824
    Style
    Kodokan Judo/BJJ
    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by D Dempsey View Post
    I'm honestly surprised SCARS is still around
    After reading quite a bit about SCARS, I'm surprised it's still around too...looks like yet another money making scheme.
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

    "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

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