Page 1 of 10 12345 ... Last
  1. #1

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,083
    Style
    Muay Thai, Boxing
    I just rub it with the orange muay thai oil I got in Bangkok. I know it's for warming up muscles but it helps. I think Khun Kao's method is better though.

    Bruised shins are part and parcel of conditioning, so I just accept it, and allow it time to heal. I just ask my partner not to kick me on that side, or if both sides are injured I just do boxing sparring.

  2. #2
    feedback's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    4,080
    Style
    Muay Thai

    What do you do to take care of your shins?

    I wear shinpads usually, but they often don't effectively protect my shins from checks. Lately I've been taking a lot of damage. I've got several painful bumps as well as some mushy bad-apple parts on my shins. What do you do after practice to help your shins?
    Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Queens, NY
    Posts
    3,008
    Style
    Boxing/BJJudo/Crossfit
    I was told Tiger Balm works, it kind of worked for me.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
    Posts
    638
    Style
    MuayThai
    You need to work the bumps and "mushy" spots out. Take a styrofoam cup, fill it with water and put it in the freezer until it freezes solid. Peel the styrofoam away and use the block of ice to really massage the bumps and spots out of your shins. You need to massage very firmly and break those areas out so the blood will flow back into the area.

    Then, when you are training, you should kick the heavy bag. A LOT! In-between rounds, you should vigorously massage your shins to get the blood flowing. Then back to kicking the heavy bag.

  5. #5
    BackFistMonkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Sinsinnatti Oh Hi Ho
    Posts
    14,787
    Style
    all things in Moderation
    What do you do to take care of your shins?
    I kick things ... a lot , with my shins . I don't wear shin pads unless my sparring partner insists . I say kick your heavy bag a lot and work on getting out of the way or stuffing those kicks a little more .

    Be more evasive/defensive , check less , condition more .
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994

    Quote Originally Posted by Jean Paula-Satire
    Never believe that the GOP and fellow bigots are completely unaware of the absurdity of their replies. They know that their remarks are frivolous, open to challenge. But they are amusing themselves, for it is their adversary who is obliged to use words responsibly, since he believes in words. The bigots and Republicans have the right to play. They even like to play with discourse for, by giving ridiculous reasons, they discredit the seriousness of their interlocutors. They delight in acting in bad faith, since they seek not to persuade by sound argument but to intimidate and disconcert. If you press them too closely, they will abruptly fall silent, loftily indicating by some phrase that the time for argument is past and that besides, they have already won

  6. #6
    feedback's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    4,080
    Style
    Muay Thai
    Quote Originally Posted by Khun Kao
    You need to work the bumps and "mushy" spots out. Take a styrofoam cup, fill it with water and put it in the freezer until it freezes solid. Peel the styrofoam away and use the block of ice to really massage the bumps and spots out of your shins. You need to massage very firmly and break those areas out so the blood will flow back into the area.

    Then, when you are training, you should kick the heavy bag. A LOT! In-between rounds, you should vigorously massage your shins to get the blood flowing. Then back to kicking the heavy bag.
    That sounds good, I'll try that one.
    Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.

  7. #7
    feedback's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Hong Kong
    Posts
    4,080
    Style
    Muay Thai
    Quote Originally Posted by BackFistMonkey
    I kick things ... a lot , with my shins . I don't wear shin pads unless my sparring partner insists . I say kick your heavy bag a lot and work on getting out of the way or stuffing those kicks a little more .

    Be more evasive/defensive , check less , condition more .
    I got them by kicking other people in a drill I was using to teach them how to check, I wasn't the one checking haha. Somebody broke the heavy bag in half, so we were without it until just recently, I've started kicking it again though.
    Tough is not how you act, tough is how you train.

  8. #8
    WhiteShark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,163
    Style
    BJJ/Shidokan
    Kick the bottom part of the heavy bag and focus on really digging the bottom of your shin into the bag. The bottom a proper leather heavy bag should be just right for conditioning. Hard but not dangerous. I kick the bottom foot or so of a 6 foot bag. Linement and massage when they are sore and I'm home. I used to sit and massage my shins while watching TV.

  9. #9

    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Salford, UK
    Posts
    452
    Style
    Muay Thai/BJJ
    i've heard the ice rubbing thing is bad for your shins in the long term though? i can't remember the reason that was given but it hink the gist of it was that it could weaken it long term, same as rolling pins supposedly can.

    i've got loads of dents and **** from going shin-to-shin and from what i can tell there's not a whole lot you can do about it except suck up the pain. checking kicks hurts. Having your kick checked hurts far worse (imo). I'd love someone to come up with a way of making them rock solid and nerveless, i'd buy that.

  10. #10

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    773
    Style
    kung fu
    I use the liniments that I get from my kung fu school or chinese doctor. I don't use super fancy dit da jow, just some standard stuff, kind of like tiger balm, but not greasy. As it was explained to me, the herbs can help promote blood circulation, which is good for bruises.

    Everything else in the thread too, ice, massage, etc...

Page 1 of 10 12345 ... Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in