1. #1

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    4
    1

    MA style recommendations for 2 boys w/ Type 1 Diabetes, 8 & 10 in TX

    Hello all,

    I respect the critical thinking prevalent in these forums. I am looking for anyone here who is
    1) Type 1 diabetic and in an MA,
    2) anyone familiar with it who practices MA or
    3) instructor familiar with teaching kids with Type 1 diabetes. As some may know, T1D athletes must take extra steps to avoid dangerous hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia and manage insulin and diet with discipline.
    If you are in the Dallas/north Dallas area and have recommendations that is super! We have visited some schools over the summer to check them out, and there is a lot to wade through.

    I am a single mother of two boys, aged 8 and 10. Both have been Type 1 diabetic ( the autoimmune, insulin-dependant type) since ages 2 and 3 years old. I am saving to get them into martial arts classes here in the Dallas area and hope to have the budget for it after the Christmas holidays for the 2020 year. They have both expressed a lot of interest-and for the 8 yo, especially *anything* involving swords or sticks. Fencing is out of our economic reach ATM, but sword or stick arts would be great.

    With some sports, it may require the boys to take off their Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor to wrestle or their pumps if/when they get one. That is not advisable for the Dexcom G6 CGM as it is a masssive PITA and very expensive to replace sensors or get Dexcom to send them so we can't just take them off willy-nilly and ridiculously expensive to replace the transmitter if it is lost! ( T1Ds will know this). Also, the Dexcom G6 sends alerts when crashing or too high, so it is indispensable for staying ahead of potentially dangerous situations of hypo or hyperglycemia and preventing DKA, Martial arts seems like a good fit for both temperment and optional competing down the line.

    I am not looking to enroll them in McDojos that emphasize competitive trophies either and expensive and unnecessary fees. I am also putting myself through school and grad school and have to be on site-unobtrusively - in case of a T1D emergency. I do want them to have community and peers and a good foundation in MA. I was hoping to find BJJ in my area that is during week after schools or every other weekend, or maybe a traditional Japanese martial art that includes sword training ( the youngest 8 yo looovvvveeessss sword and stick play!) I even heard there may be traditional European sword schools in DFW somewhere. Fencing is an expensive sport and out of our reach ATM, but I hear that some of the Japanese schools include sword/stick training as part of their curriculum.

    At the very least, I am hoping that in addition to having peers and community and making friends ( and helping them feel less different and help self-esteem) and of course disciple as they will need that in their lives to manage the Type 1 D and become resilient and persistent and focused, I am looking for an MA that can result in
    -good emphasis on various break falls and rolls ( very useful) on various surfaces
    -great footwork
    -balance and positioning/stances that emphasize awareness of the body and how to not get thrown off-balance/hold one's balance
    -evasions and redirections of hits,slaps,kicks,objects
    - getting out of holds on hands,lapels. Chin na kind of things.
    -de-escalation and direction of aggression in appropriate or useful ways.

    Lastly, I am trying to avoid any excessively far-right, nationalist, jingoistic dojos considering my kids are Middle Eastern ( Iraqi arab and Armenian) and Euro/Okie mix and our values are pluralistic and progressive I am raising them with. I say that as their ethnicity has created unbelievably crappy behavior in adults in the past-not because we are thin-skinned-far, far from it. So any instructor that goes around ranting about middle eastern people or arabs or muslims (although they go to oriental orthodox church we also have muslims in our family and our community), I want to avoid that for my kids psychological and emotional well-being.They have a lifetime of contending with that already. Please don't flame me on that-I speak from experience and interacting with some MA adults who do that kind of thing a lot and it is not uncommon in our area.

    Any advice on anything above is so very much appreciated as I sift through and try to find a match for my kids that I hope will be long-term and beneficial to their physical and mental health. Thank you ( Sorry so long)

  2. #2
    hungryjoe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    9,153
    Style
    decrepit mouth boxing
    This is probably the most difficult to recommend request I've seen on this site given the glucose monitors. I can't recommend an art with stick work at that age but perhaps someone here will have an idea.

    Welcome to the site and good luck from another Okie.

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    4
    1
    Thank you so much.
    I apologize if it is too long, and I do hope I am posting in the appropriate forum. I also have to be on-site ( and out of the way-**not** hovering-just outside or available), as I do not expect the instructors to be Type 1 trained. I joke that I am their pancreas at this age and have been since doing it as a single parent since they were 27 months then when the second was hit at age 3. It is a tall order, but I am trying to do what is best by the boys, and I know folks on this site are good at sifting through the bullshdio and being aware of what local dojos reputations are made of. I don't exactly trust yelp or google reviews as much, LOL.

  4. #4
    NeilG's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Saskatoon, Canada
    Posts
    2,319
    Style
    Kendo
    1
    I think kendo would suit your boys very well, depending on where the insulin pumps mount. In the beginning there is no contact at all, just a lot of footwork and hitting drills. After a while they would graduate to wearing armour and fighting but between the armour itself and the limited target areas you should be able to protect the pumps from damage. There is no kicking punching or throwing but there can be cases where people crash into each other.

    Here’s the Texas dojo list: http://www.auskf.info/dojo/tx.htm

    I know the Dallas-Fort Worth club takes kids, not sure how many kids they have now. Kids especially younger ones are more successful if they can train with other kids not adults.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Sarasota, FL
    Posts
    8,779
    Style
    Jiu-Jitsu, Judo,Wrestling
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Benga_Azad View Post
    Hello all,

    I respect the critical thinking prevalent in these forums. I am looking for anyone here who is
    1) Type 1 diabetic and in an MA,
    2) anyone familiar with it who practices MA or
    3) instructor familiar with teaching kids with Type 1 diabetes. As some may know, T1D athletes must take extra steps to avoid dangerous hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia and manage insulin and diet with discipline.
    If you are in the Dallas/north Dallas area and have recommendations that is super! We have visited some schools over the summer to check them out, and there is a lot to wade through.

    I am a single mother of two boys, aged 8 and 10. Both have been Type 1 diabetic ( the autoimmune, insulin-dependant type) since ages 2 and 3 years old. I am saving to get them into martial arts classes here in the Dallas area and hope to have the budget for it after the Christmas holidays for the 2020 year. They have both expressed a lot of interest-and for the 8 yo, especially *anything* involving swords or sticks. Fencing is out of our economic reach ATM, but sword or stick arts would be great.

    With some sports, it may require the boys to take off their Dexcom G6 continuous glucose monitor to wrestle or their pumps if/when they get one. That is not advisable for the Dexcom G6 CGM as it is a masssive PITA and very expensive to replace sensors or get Dexcom to send them so we can't just take them off willy-nilly and ridiculously expensive to replace the transmitter if it is lost! ( T1Ds will know this). Also, the Dexcom G6 sends alerts when crashing or too high, so it is indispensable for staying ahead of potentially dangerous situations of hypo or hyperglycemia and preventing DKA, Martial arts seems like a good fit for both temperment and optional competing down the line.

    I am not looking to enroll them in McDojos that emphasize competitive trophies either and expensive and unnecessary fees. I am also putting myself through school and grad school and have to be on site-unobtrusively - in case of a T1D emergency. I do want them to have community and peers and a good foundation in MA. I was hoping to find BJJ in my area that is during week after schools or every other weekend, or maybe a traditional Japanese martial art that includes sword training ( the youngest 8 yo looovvvveeessss sword and stick play!) I even heard there may be traditional European sword schools in DFW somewhere. Fencing is an expensive sport and out of our reach ATM, but I hear that some of the Japanese schools include sword/stick training as part of their curriculum.

    At the very least, I am hoping that in addition to having peers and community and making friends ( and helping them feel less different and help self-esteem) and of course disciple as they will need that in their lives to manage the Type 1 D and become resilient and persistent and focused, I am looking for an MA that can result in
    -good emphasis on various break falls and rolls ( very useful) on various surfaces
    -great footwork
    -balance and positioning/stances that emphasize awareness of the body and how to not get thrown off-balance/hold one's balance
    -evasions and redirections of hits,slaps,kicks,objects
    - getting out of holds on hands,lapels. Chin na kind of things.
    -de-escalation and direction of aggression in appropriate or useful ways.

    Lastly, I am trying to avoid any excessively far-right, nationalist, jingoistic dojos considering my kids are Middle Eastern ( Iraqi arab and Armenian) and Euro/Okie mix and our values are pluralistic and progressive I am raising them with. I say that as their ethnicity has created unbelievably crappy behavior in adults in the past-not because we are thin-skinned-far, far from it. So any instructor that goes around ranting about middle eastern people or arabs or muslims (although they go to oriental orthodox church we also have muslims in our family and our community), I want to avoid that for my kids psychological and emotional well-being.They have a lifetime of contending with that already. Please don't flame me on that-I speak from experience and interacting with some MA adults who do that kind of thing a lot and it is not uncommon in our area.

    Any advice on anything above is so very much appreciated as I sift through and try to find a match for my kids that I hope will be long-term and beneficial to their physical and mental health. Thank you ( Sorry so long)
    You should ask the other Armenians at the church.

    I would be shocked if there were not Armenian black belts and instructors in your community.

    Armenians are typically tough, and stand up for the Armenian community.

    As you know....

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    16
    Style
    Araki-ryu & Buko-ryu
    One of my associates is Type 1 diabetic (adult) - insulin dependent - and he has been doing martial arts daily. He is very brittle (blood sugar drops and surges radically). What has really helped him is a very severe ketogenic diet. He has done a tremendous amount of research on this, in regards to diabetes, and he is able to maintain himself in four hour practices, including grappling, with quick irregular bursts of energy. Rather than attempt to speak for him, if you are interested, send me a PM and I'll link you up.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    4
    Thank you! I am trying to see if we can find them a non-Friday class near us right now!

  8. #8

    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Posts
    571
    Style
    Judo and HEMA
    2
    So, there is an alternative. I am... more than familiar with the local SCA group to your area.
    They have a very good youth program, and I am reasonably certain they can get you hooked up with loaner equipment and can work around something like an insulin pump.
    https://ansteorra.org/steppes/steppe...onthly-events/

    There is some contact involved, but not a huge amount. Especially not for a kid that age. The age divisions mean that the contact level will increase as they get older.
    Additionally, I know of at least one man that fights the SCA's armored combat game with a T1D insulin pump as an adult. And the adult version of that game is fairly hard contact.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in