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  1. #11
    Ice Hole's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WowReally View Post
    I trained at the Chinese Shaolin Center in Denver. Under “masters” Sharon and David Soard. What a couple of frauds. The sad thing is that I think they actually partially believe that they are great.

    It wasn’t until I started training with teachers who knew what they were doing that I really understood how bad my training from the Soards really was. Proper stances are barely taught by the Soards. They don’t condition you enough. They run the place with a cult mentality that takes time too see. And there is more. But, since people here have trained with them too, you know what I am talking about. I do believe their training causes more sports related injuries then it supposively prevents.
    Uh, when did you train with them? Soard has a criminal history of sexual abuses..

    https://www.dailycamera.com/2009/09/...ets-probation/
    '“I am no advocate of passivity,” Coffin Mott said in an 1860 speech. “Quakerism, as I understand it, does not mean quietism. The early Friends were agitators; disturbers of the peace; and were more obnoxious in their day to charges, which are now so freely made, than we are.”'

  2. #12

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    Yup

    Quote Originally Posted by W. Rabbit View Post
    Uh, when did you train with them? Soard has a criminal history of sexual abuses..

    https://www.dailycamera.com/2009/09/...ets-probation/

    I was at the Boulder school around that time. I left right before the lawsuit because I saw things were about to boil over with their favorite group of black belts...but didn’t exactly know why except there was a lot of tension building. I knew about the lawsuit when I went back, but figured he learned his lesson (I didn’t know about the multiple cases). As far as I know he hasn’t been a repeat offender since the students took him to court.

    I mainly went back because I believed that I was learning a 1500 year old martial art that was being taught properly (I know better now). I also figured that since they were no longer associated with Sin The that they would really positively change how they taught for the better (not what happened). I left the second time for completely different reasons other then his shady past. But, I never could fully trust David because of the sexual assault charges.

    The Soards have gotten lazier with their training and want students to test as soon as possible. So instead of having people wait the usual years between black belt levels they are pushing people through faster. To me they don’t seem to care what that pressure can do to some people psychologically or physically as David is constantly on people to test...they want their money. That was one of the crappy things I got tired of.
    Last edited by WowReally; 11/17/2019 12:48am at .

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by WowReally View Post
    I am more into stuff like Tai Chi. But thanks for the ideas.
    You mentioned you trained in Denver. Do you still live there? I googled Taijiquan schools in that area and found one run by a student of Chen ZiQiang, from Chenjiagou. Master Chen ZiQiang is very well regarded by tuishou practitioners -- some of the best videos on youtube showing TJQ applications and sparring are his or his students.


  4. #14

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    Thanks Though

    Quote Originally Posted by Drunken Soim View Post
    You mentioned you trained in Denver. Do you still live there? I googled Taijiquan schools in that area and found one run by a student of Chen ZiQiang, from Chenjiagou. Master Chen ZiQiang is very well regarded by tuishou practitioners -- some of the best videos on youtube showing TJQ applications and sparring are his or his students.

    I really don’t have much interest in hard contact. I already have suffered from two bad injuries when I was at the CSC, due to bad training and being hit too hard by “accident” a few times. The martial arts community tends to attract, well bluntly, assholes who become more aggressive (including passive aggressive) due to being trained how to hurt others. I have seen this type of training awaken aggressive tendencies in nicer people and it doesn’t get properly balanced within. The plain truth is the martial arts community attracts more then its share of people who really should be going to a therapist for proper healing, not a martial arts. I pledged to myself not to return to a community that attracts more then its fair share of mentally unbalanced people, and I never will. The Soards are no exception to this commonality in the martial arts community.

    I am outta here. The environment you spend time in has an impact on you. Choose wisely.

  5. #15
    Cousin Eddie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by WowReally View Post

    I am outta here. The environment you spend time in has an impact on you. Choose wisely.
    Of course it does. lol
    Combatives training log.

    Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

    Drum thread

    Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by WowReally View Post
    I really don’t have much interest in hard contact. I already have suffered from two bad injuries when I was at the CSC, due to bad training and being hit too hard by “accident” a few times. The martial arts community tends to attract, well bluntly, assholes who become more aggressive (including passive aggressive) due to being trained how to hurt others. I have seen this type of training awaken aggressive tendencies in nicer people and it doesn’t get properly balanced within. The plain truth is the martial arts community attracts more then its share of people who really should be going to a therapist for proper healing, not a martial arts. I pledged to myself not to return to a community that attracts more then its fair share of mentally unbalanced people, and I never will. The Soards are no exception to this commonality in the martial arts community.

    I am outta here. The environment you spend time in has an impact on you. Choose wisely.
    I realize you had a really bad experience, and I sympathize, but the MA community still has a lot to offer. Some psychos do feel drawn to it, but if you train in a positive environment, those people will either change or go away. And if they don't, well, you go away or take charge of the situation and make them go away.

    Taijiquan might be good for you because there isn't a lot of people practicing it who want to fight, but it's still a Martial Art. Well, a classical one that isn't popular in combat sports. Usually you don't need to do push-hands with resistance if you train Taijiquan. There's no need to, but you're losing part of the experience that defines it as a Martial Art.

    Martial Arts can be about much more than hurting people. If you decide to stick with it, I believe you won't regret it. If not, good luck on your struggles.

    Enviado de meu SM-G950F usando o Tapatalk

  7. #17
    Ice Hole's Avatar
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    This is why a bullshido detector is critical early on, it'll save you years of fear, stress, and cash. Nobody wants to be the dude (and we have many here) who gets that burst bubble after investing so much (which in some cases involves finding out your "master" is a fraud, felon, rapist, abuser, etc.)

    It's important to find out what motivates people to train so you can work with them better, and what motivates instructors to want to train, so you can identify red flags. I trained at a legit school in every art I took because after Judo, I had a great sense of the physical and mental requirements of a living art. Practically everyone in kung fu, judo, BJJ, Muay Thai etc (minus a few bad apples) was on the up and up. People were honest about why they trained, and even though a lot of us competed in some form or another, the "this training will make you a master killer" stuff was absent.

    I have one senior brother with muscular dystrophy who trains in Hung Ga mostly for the qigong, because (according to him) it's allowed him to still be able to raise his arms. He still reaches out now and then to train with me. That sort of motivation makes my heart ache, but also reminds me of the importance of sticking with any kind of training.

    BJJ was one of my favorite places to test out kung fu theories, and funny enough, they all worked very, very well, right down to the breathing techniques (as an asthmatic, my motivation for training martial arts is nothing more than being able to breath under pressure).
    '“I am no advocate of passivity,” Coffin Mott said in an 1860 speech. “Quakerism, as I understand it, does not mean quietism. The early Friends were agitators; disturbers of the peace; and were more obnoxious in their day to charges, which are now so freely made, than we are.”'

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