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  1. #1
    Wounded Ronin's Avatar
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    So what's the deal with the cultural fear of being replaced, in context of the US?

    From https://www.politico.com/magazine/st...hooting-227612

    But all day on Sunday, the day after the shooting in El Paso, hardened advocates became emotional while explaining what it’s like to live in the United States after a killer drove 10 hours to kill Mexicans, Latinos and immigrants. The next day I still felt restless after a conversation with a friend. She had been crying because her husband overheard white men at the community pool remarking that while they didn’t agree with the killings — how magnanimous — they, too, didn’t want white people to be “wiped out” and for Hispanics to “take over.”

    Where was this said? The deeply Republican city of Los Angeles, of course.
    There have been scattered references in media to people saying that they're afraid of somehow being culturally and ethnically replaced.

    I don't understand this. Who are the ones saying this? How many people are saying this? Are they politically active and if so do they represent a statistically significant portion of Donald Trump voters? What is the basis of this anxiety or belief?

    Personally I've never really felt like I fully fit in, culturally, anywhere, so the idea of not being hegemonic feels like the norm, not like some terrifying new vista of I don't know what.


    There is an earlier context of which I am aware where certain cultural in-groups had a fear of being supplanted. Basically in some Pacific Island nations and to my understanding among native populations in Hawai'i there was or is the fear of becoming a so-called "stranger in their own land" which basically has to do with foreigners moving in, making money and establishing businesses or what have you, and buying land, and the native populations feeling that they would be economically impoverished in relation to the immigrants, and not own the land that was once lived on by their ancestors. However, that idea also had to do with colonization of many of the Pacific islands by Europeans and by Imperial Japan. So while I don't fully agree with the idea I can understand it in the context of a relatively small population and economic power versus the population and economic and military power of a colonial administration. I can understand people feeling that way in that context.

    But when it comes to the US, you don't really have that context. People living in, say, LA as cited in the above article don't have, say, a Mexican colonial administration with warships and marines and funding to build plantations or something like that. The LA residents hold more political and economic power than the immigrants. So I am really confused by the anxiety about being replaced. I don't know what that even means.
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    Bneterasedmynam's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wounded Ronin View Post
    From https://www.politico.com/magazine/st...hooting-227612



    There have been scattered references in media to people saying that they're afraid of somehow being culturally and ethnically replaced.

    I don't understand this. Who are the ones saying this? How many people are saying this? Are they politically active and if so do they represent a statistically significant portion of Donald Trump voters? What is the basis of this anxiety or belief?

    Personally I've never really felt like I fully fit in, culturally, anywhere, so the idea of not being hegemonic feels like the norm, not like some terrifying new vista of I don't know what.


    There is an earlier context of which I am aware where certain cultural in-groups had a fear of being supplanted. Basically in some Pacific Island nations and to my understanding among native populations in Hawai'i there was or is the fear of becoming a so-called "stranger in their own land" which basically has to do with foreigners moving in, making money and establishing businesses or what have you, and buying land, and the native populations feeling that they would be economically impoverished in relation to the immigrants, and not own the land that was once lived on by their ancestors. However, that idea also had to do with colonization of many of the Pacific islands by Europeans and by Imperial Japan. So while I don't fully agree with the idea I can understand it in the context of a relatively small population and economic power versus the population and economic and military power of a colonial administration. I can understand people feeling that way in that context.

    But when it comes to the US, you don't really have that context. People living in, say, LA as cited in the above article don't have, say, a Mexican colonial administration with warships and marines and funding to build plantations or something like that. The LA residents hold more political and economic power than the immigrants. So I am really confused by the anxiety about being replaced. I don't know what that even means.
    I will answer this in the simplest way possible. Whitey fears blacky. Most bigotry is rooted to an extent in fear. By replaced they really mean pecking order.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bneterasedmynam View Post
    I will answer this in the simplest way possible. Whitey fears blacky. Most bigotry is rooted to an extent in fear. By replaced they really mean pecking order.
    I took an African American friend of mine to a Nascar race.

    He had never been.

    He may have been the only black guy there.

    He clung to me as if I was his cuddle partner until we left.

    Humans of every skin color have survival traits that involve situational awareness of their acceptance within groups, their ability to blend in among groups, and their ability to stand out among groups.

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    It is Fake's Avatar
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    It's taught hatred. It has existed since the US was founded and will continue until the end. The same divide exists in every country. It also exists within each race.

    Make sure you talk to some Native Americans and then understand the fear of the "Browning of America."

    Better yet, go look at South Africa, study Apartheid and then look at racial demographics. Then go look at what is happening now.

    Then apply that to America.

    If that's too much work, I will make it very simple.

    Paranoia.

    People spent centuries usurping land from the ingdneous population and now we are watching it slowly happen to the usurpers.

    We can pretend it wouldn't be scary, but people fear losing their status. It is easier to hate than work together.
    Last edited by It is Fake; 8/14/2019 3:25pm at .

  5. #5
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
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    And on today’s episode of Wounded Ronin’s Stupid Questions with Obvious Answers.........

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    Alarmist talk radio and 24 hour news crank out anxiety of status quo change as their business model. Stories and concerns that someone will replace us is almost inevitable in such a business.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bneterasedmynam View Post
    I will answer this in the simplest way possible. Whitey fears blacky. Most bigotry is rooted to an extent in fear. By replaced they really mean pecking order.
    Not really. You go back far enough and people were complaining about polish imigration in the same way they complain about current imigration.
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    gregaquaman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    I took an African American friend of mine to a Nascar race.

    He had never been.

    He may have been the only black guy there.

    He clung to me as if I was his cuddle partner until we left.

    Humans of every skin color have survival traits that involve situational awareness of their acceptance within groups, their ability to blend in among groups, and their ability to stand out among groups.
    Where I couldn't think of a white only sport. And we definitely have redneck represented.
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    It is Fake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregaquaman View Post
    Where I couldn't think of a white only sport. And we definitely have redneck represented.
    You mean percieved audience make up right?

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    And on today’s episode of Wounded Ronin’s Stupid Questions with Obvious Answers.........
    I thought for a while about whether to validate this with a response, and finally decided to post the following reflection.

    It's only obvious if you're in that primal, highly tribalistic mindset that you've previously articulated. If you're not in that mindset, then it's not obvious. So the fallacy in the above is the assumption that everyone must be in the same mindset.

    I had thought that with the amount of money put into public education, and the relatively high quality of childhood nutrition in the United States, that perhaps many people had grown out of such a tribalistic mindset. That perhaps such things might be more ubiquitous in settings with poor childhood nutrition and no public education infrastructure. But, maybe this is not the case. Maybe many haven't had the chance to grow out of such a basic mindset.
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