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  1. #41
    kimjonghng's Avatar
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    Goju Ryu
    Quote Originally Posted by lant3rn View Post
    You’re falling under the same trap as ccamara, Muay Thai itself was novel to the fast majority of non Thai people and kick boxers until around the mid 2000s.

    but if you want a great place that specializes in really hammering home proper technique then.

    https://muay-thai-santai.com

    This is the best gym I visited when it comes to teaching technique and taking time really with trainees. Everyone is really is great; especially Phone. There is a cool waterfall nearby to go swimming in, surrounded by some beautiful scenery.

    As for weapons you would have to dig around for a good kali school, I know they have them there.

    Your not going to learn anything secret or deadly while your there. If your going to train in Thailand; go there to experience the culture, country and people first. If those things have no appeal to you, your waisting your time going.
    culture, country, places and food are definitely on the agenda. I've actually made a list of places I want to see. Training would only be part of a visit tbf

  2. #42

    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Goju Ryu, Muay Chaiya
    Some history info, This is from Alex Tsui, a well respected muay historian from Hong Kong

    ¨I have been working on the DNA of Chaiya boxing for some 20 years. Its history tells the story. When King Taksin the Great was on his way to re-unify Siam, after the fall of Ayutthaya, his frontline general Chao Phya Chakri ( a Malay )took an army to Chumporn in the South. Most native folks hid in the wood for fear of hostility. But a Man named Maan ( Chinese name as in Mamnchu ) took his men to join force with the royal army. They trained together and then went on to quash Nakorn Srithwmmarat, one of the four major rebel kingdoms.This was in early 1769. I see this as a fusion of the Malay man's fighting skills with the Chinaman's norther kungfu ( Qing style was famous for grappling skills, cluches, locks & throws ) Why do I suggest it was norther Qing combat art ? Interestingly, my discovery reveals that in 1767, when Ayutthaya was under attack by the Burmese, the Qing Court of China she
    sent her war-toughened General Ming Suy ( northern dialect Rui ) to mount a counter offensive againt the Burmese, in the northern Shan States. An army of 25,000 was led by Ming Suy, the commander who was then the Viceroy of Yunnan and Guizhou. After some success his army was routed due to the hostile cilmatic and terrain conditions. On recor, Ming Suy was either killed in battle or committed suicide. But the truth, As I deduce, was that he took his surviving men to hide in south Thailand, away from the frontline and the turmoil of Ayutthaya. So, when Phya Chakri came down, Warriors wanted and need the battlefield to re-live. The name Maan is not That, it conveys Manchurian, their roots. He was made Lord Chumporn on his war merits. His son, incidentally, was named Suy !

    Was it a tact to commemorate the figure head or was this pure co-incidence ?
    The other angle is the Srivijaya tradition. This was the powerful maritime power dominant in the Malacca Strait from AD 7th till 11th Century. Their iconic fighting art is Silat and Kung Tao ( Fist fighting Chinese ) The art was so widespread through the ages and it is to be found in the lower southern provinces of Thailand today. Locks, throws and clutches are its specialties. Primarily low stance. Why ? because they,

    Javanese were quite aquatic in combat ( prove in authority Chinese annals ) The Chaiya people used to live on rafts beside the sea as well. Hence the low stance for better gravity control. This is distinctly at variance with muaythai proper.
    Therefore, muaythai Chaiya, as I see it, was muaythai boran localised in the conditions prevalent in southern Siam, between 1769 and 1850. The Bangkok form of muay came down with the Reverend Thaan Ma ( a fugitive ) who became abbot at the Chaiya temple, Wat Thung Chabchang. There, he taught the community boxing and made it famous in the region.

    Muay Chaiy's philosophy was the dance with soul and spirit. Its perpetual motion especially when close tangle begins, until the enemy is subdued. Close quarter combat is its trump card, using the opponent's motion to become your reaction. Very classical¨

  3. #43

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    I dont know what trap the guy keeps talking about...he is the one who pays 300 bucks for 3 weeks training...thats execessive. But maybe he gets discount for helping with groceries. That is exclusively farang prices...those places are definitely tourist oriented. Thai students dont pay that crazy ammount, of course.

    Thia can happen even in the Bangkok aquarium, where you have a price in Thai, written in Thai and a different price in english...pretty dirty trick...unless you can read thai.
    Last edited by ccamara; 6/24/2019 4:29am at .

  4. #44

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    May 2013
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    If you want to learn Thai arts dont go to a Kali place, there are plenty of thai weapons places. Even at regular schools they do Krabi Krabong, though more oriented to the theatrical scene. You have this guys in Bangkok, at Ramkhanheang university for example

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ri_XiyWlPY

  5. #45

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    Oct 2007
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    London
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    what style?
    Post another clip of your Muay Chaiya in action where the guy wins with a double leg followed by RNC. That’s hard to beat.

    Maybe you can enlighten me on the ancient Thai origins of those techniques.

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