1. #1

    Join Date
    Jun 2011
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    Tampa, Fl
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    Isshinryu Karate

    Boxing centered approach to the Thai clinch?

    I know that at longer ranges, leg kicks and teeps are the Thai answer for stopping a boxing-inclined fighter. But, let’s say that a more boxing-inclined fighter were able to use leg checks, teep scoops, and aggressive movement to get inside the range of those kicks. Naturally, they would then be within the range of the clinch and it’s related arsenal of elbows and knees— all of which are also effective answers to a punching-centered approach.

    However, I’ve theorized that perhaps by controlling the arms of the Thai fighter whenever they try to clinch, utilizing lateral movement, and framing with the lead hand followed by the cross, one could stay within the range of effective leg kicks and teeps, while also avoiding knees and elbows, and getting tied up. Those are just my initial guesses at this approach. Does anyone have any techniques/concepts, or fighters they know of that are successful in using punches in the clinch range?

    I have recently started my Muay Thai journey, with prior experience in karate and mma. I know that the best way to handle leg kicks, teeps, and the clinch is to learn them and practice them yourself. I am in no way trying to discard Thai methodology in favor of my own “arrogant” ways. I am open to all the teachings my kru has to offer, and have been focused on using only Muay Thai techniques in my sparring, drilling, and shadow boxing. I just love the art of striking in general, and it’s myriad approaches to getting the job done. I guess because I trained in extensively in MMA, my mind just automatically tries to think of ways that an x-centered fighter could nullify a z-centered fighters attacks, or vice versa.

    Anyway, I was just looking for fighters to watch or techniques that would allow for my theorized approach to work, so that I could incorporate them later on down the road once I have a better understanding of the fundamentals of Muay Thai. My approach to striking is to learn all that I can from all the beautiful arts that there are, and play around with them and synthesize them into my own style, as any fighter does.

  2. #2
    gregaquaman's Avatar
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    Feb 2010
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    Arlie Beach
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    mma /boxing/muai thai
    Look at Dutch style.
    Whitsunday Martial Arts Airlie Beach North Queensland.
    http://www.facebook.com/#!/WhitsundayMartialArts

  3. #3

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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by gregaquaman View Post
    Look at Dutch style.
    Thank you! Any Dutch fighters you recommend studying who follow this approach?

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but I posed my question more for Muay Thai because I thought that in the more Dutch style promotions such as K1 and glory, clinching/tying up and the plum are not allowed? To me this is why boxing is more prominent in those styles and promotions.

  4. #4

    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    Someone recently posted lawrence kenshin's breakdown of an evasime MT guy who avoids the clinch pretty well, but he's an out-fighter rather than an in-fighter, so part of his strategy was countering his opponents clinch attempts with quick trips and dumps, which then ofc leads back to outfighting range.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8ylWvwDNsPA&t=316s
    I think the difficulty with avoiding the clinch is that a lot of attempts to avoid it can simply end up establishing it. e.g. any frame you construct, every attempt to wrap up a limb establishes the clinch - it simply does so on your terms. That's how Lerdsila's strategy against clinching works, he establishes a clinch on his own terms and exits the range again quickly (by throwing).
    You could instead look at it in terms of establishing a clinch yourself (which should be relatively easy since we're assuming that you, as an in-fighter, have the advantage in the immediately preceding range) but instead of throwing knees or throwing your opponent, exit the clinch by pushing them off balance and away from you to resume your punch offensive.

    General wisdom is that good defense against wrestling requires good wrestling. Presumably includes clinching.

    I guess one general piece of advice vs clinching (or, honestly, most attacks) is good lateral movement. it's difficult to clinch effectively with someone who isn't standing in front of you.

  5. #5

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Thailand
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    Goju Ryu, Muay Chaiya
    The thing about thai clinch is that it is a favoured position in Thailand, not only because of its effectiveness but also for the sake of spectacle and points. That position is one of the best ways to gain points in Thailand, with knee strikes, effective control of the opponent etc, and also Thais loooove it...so taking this into account, there are many fighters that avoid clinching and old boxing styles that completely try to avoid the clinch, like Muay Chaiya.

    So In my opinion there is an excessive love for the clinch in Thailand, even when its not necessary. It can be avoided and you can use that arm control to land some effective elbows or make space etc. my experience has been different, as my first teacher there, a very technical guy put a lot of emphasis on avoiding the clinch and we did practice it a lot, but usually in most boxing camps they emphasise the engagement more than disengagement or alternatives. Is mostly engage, knees and throws, and elbows ( Which is pretty effective) and some escaping but not so much Avoiding the engagement, which is very interesting to practice too.

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