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  1. #1

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    tapping very early to Americana , Kimura and Omoplata

    Long before an Americana, Kimura or Omoplata is fully into place on either of my arms, my elbow makes a popping sound and I can't roll for week or two because that arm can't support my weight without a lot of pain. I have lost months of mat time to this, I once had it done to both arms in one night. I tap embarrassingly early on these holds to prevent it from happening. I do not have this issue with straight arm bars.

    1. In general, I have above average flexibility, even for martial artists.
    2. Outside of grappling, I have on occasion gotten tennis elbow from using a lot of wrap-strikes in a short period of time when doing weapon sparring.
    3. I am about 5 foot 5, with relatively short arms, don't know if those dimensions would be a factor.

    Is this an issue you have heard of before? Is this common to people with 1 (flexible,) 2 (a tendency to get tennis elbow) or 3 (short arms and/or short height) from above?

  2. #2

    Join Date
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    The connection to tennis elbow would point me towards arthritis/calcification, which very flexible persons are more prone to in general. Would fit in with the popping sound and not being able to support weight afterwards (tendons slipping over/out of place and being sore afterwards).

    Short arms surely are a factor regarding angles, but I would see for an MRI scan of the elbows and physical therapy to improve the range of movement. Does not have anything to do with straight arm bars, different tendons (there: mostly ligaments) involved. Garami-style armbars involve some nasty bottlenecks in your joint, you should look whether there is a numbness in your pinky at times.

    Disclaimer: I am by no means a doctor or physical therapist, this is pure conjecture from my own experience and knowledge applied on the descriptions given.

  3. #3

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    I've been told that women have more flexibility and feel the pain from locks later than men, but their arms pop at the same point, so it's dangerous to execute locks on them because they might not feel the pain until it's too late.

    This might be part of the problem for you too.

  4. #4
    goodlun's Avatar
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    Don't know but there is no shame in tapping early and tapping often be safe when you train.
    Of the single rapier fight between valiant men, having both skill, he that is the best wrestler, or if neither of them can wrestle, the strongest man most commonly kills the other, or leaves him at his mercy.
    –George Silver, Paradoxes of Defence

  5. #5
    BKR's Avatar
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    I tap early and often to any sort of joint lock, always have. Chokes, well, passing out is very relaxing, unless it's a poorly applied painful one, or my neck is getting twisted.

    Keep tapping early, no big deal.

    Go to an MD if you want a diagnosis.
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

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  6. #6

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    I tap.
    I rarely mind tapping.
    I always mind injuries.

  7. #7
    solves problems with violence supporting member
    Ming Loyalist's Avatar
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    i tap very early to ude garame on the side where i had an ac separation. serious limitation of my flexibility on that side.
    "Face punches are an essential character building part of a martial art. You don't truly love your children unless you allow them to get punched in the face." - chi-conspiricy
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  8. #8

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    I find most people need to find their happy medium of how much they're willing to tolerate/risk before tapping.

  9. #9

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    Tapping early and often is a best practice
    This is good to hear from people who are better grapplers (than I ever expect to be) and who don't know me personally (and thus aren't concerned about my feelings.)

    The only thing I tap slightly late on is chokes, but I haven't been choked out in a few decades so obviously not that late. I will even tap to body triangles if they are painful enough, just saying.

    you are old, arthritis, something about your body structure have things more often associated with female
    Sparing you all details, yes indeed.

    See your doctor for medical advice
    Always true. My relationship with my doctor is interesting because it's all about paradoxical miscommunications between me asking her to make sure I am in shape for martial arts and her telling me to lose weight (good advice on her part obviously.) She is the one I got the (very helpful) tennis elbow diagnosis from.

  10. #10

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    I have hyperflexible shoulders, and occaisionally get a painful pop at moments I wouldn't expect, though their timing is much more random for me and I haven't had trouble with shoulder locks. Keep tapping early, but if your problem is hypermobility related, my fysiotherapist's reccomendation was strength training for the shoulders (rows, military presses, shoulder presses, pullups, pushups/bench presses). Strengthening and tightening the surrounding muscle is supposed to reduce the mobility.

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