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  1. #101

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    Quote Originally Posted by plasma View Post
    You are terrible, even if you donít know it.

    Letís hit this right off the bat, this article applies to you. Unless you are a Professional MMA fighter in a top level promotion, an Olympic Level Judo-ka, or equivalent this article applies to you. Itís safe to say you arenít any of those things, because people like that donít waste precious training time reading stupid **** on Internet Forums, but we will get to that in the next section. Now that we established an audience, you, yes you reading this, suck at Martial Arts. I know, you have over 10 years of experience, have some crazy (possibly made up or exaggerated) street situation where you proved your martial prowess or teach Martial Arts Professionally. It doesnít matter and it is ok, for most of us this is a hobby, something we do in our spare time. And for you that teach full time for a living, not everyone that does something for a living is considered an expert or authority in their field. The issue is very few people see what it is to be good at Martial Arts. I have trained with numerous instructors of multiple different disciplines, and after 15 years of training and multiple black belts I can get the better of them or make them work for it. And at the end of the session, they must think Iím pretty good, but in reality I just know they suck just as bad as I do. I know I suck because when I roll with a Mundial Champion, or Randori with a National Level Judo-ka I get ragdolled and it turns into a exercise in survival. This is equivalent to being a College Senior. High School Freshman look at you as a knowledgeable highly educated figure in your field. However, the real experts in the field see you as just a beginner that doesnít know anything but has potential. People reading this article, fall between High School Freshman (beginners/White Belts) and College Seniors (You or your instructor). But the true expert in hand to hand combat see you all as you really are. Terrible. Now you ask, how do I start being good? WellÖ.

    Getting good at Martial Arts takes far more work than you are putting in

    I think itís crazy that people think they can get good at a skill they are putting so little time into. Take your career, Letís assume you are a doctor. You go to undergrad for 4 years, 4 years of Med School, then another 3-7 years of residency before you considered a full doctor. Assuming a standard 40-hour week (I know doctors work more than that) That is over 22,000 hours of time training, studying, learning and practicing. That doesnít include the continuous learning and improving on the job. Now, after work you decide to try Martial Arts and want to be good, so you go into it hardcore and do 3 1.5 hour classes a week. At 4.5 hours a week, using the same calculation, it would take you nearly 100 years. If you are immortal that is awesome, go for it. If you one of us mere mortals, youíll need to spend more time on the mat. The fact is the people that are good and can fight at the level you want train full time, 8 hours a day, technique, strength and conditioning. Now, if supporting yourself and your family is your priority and not training, like most of us, youíll just have to accept you will never be good. You may be good enough, to be happy with your skill, and that is ok. But youíll never be on the level of the elite.

    You are out of shape, and no amount of technique will make up for your poor diet

    Do you know who loses a fight? The first person that gets tired. How do you feel after a 5 minute sparring round? Are you exhausted 3 mins into it? How many rounds can you do, can you go hard for 5 minutes, get a fresh partner and keep going? At 30 minutes do you need a break? So yeah, you are out of shape. Part of it is your Strength and Conditioning regimen (we will get to that) but most likely you have a shitty diet. How many calories is your Martial Arts workout burning? If you arenít even sparring in training itís probably not nearly as much as you think. How many calories are you eating after training, ití probably more than you think. This is why a lot of Black Belt instructors are overweight. With 20 years of poor diet, and getting less exercise than they think your instructor is now in their 40s and overweight. Yes after 20 years, they have some skills they can show you, but donít expect them to do 10 5 minute rounds against opponents that are pushing the pace, they will be lucky to do 2 rounds and they usually against people far less skilled so they donít need to tap into the non-existent cardio. At this point, I donít care how good your technique is or most likely, how good you think it is. Once you get tired, or that tight sharp technique gets sloppy. Hands drop from the head to the chest, elbows come away from the body and your sprawls behind a second too late.

    This is where the CCW carriers talk about their concealed pistol. You know what is important in shooting accurately? Breath Control. Even if you are awesome at the range, have you even tried to do wind sprints, then try to do shoot? I watched a ďCCW expertĒ get so tired that he missed 10 out of 10 shots on a target 15 yards away and then grabbed his pocket knife instead of his spare magazine and tried to jam it in his magazine well. This is assuming you can get to your weapon at all times and your mass and lack of flexibility doesnít pin your pistol between you and your seat.


    Size and Strength matter

    Now that we addressed that you are fat and out of shape. The next bombshell is that you are weaker than you think. And the end of the day your technique is going to be as good as you can apply them. Yes, technique come first, but strength and power follows technique. Unless you are putting in the hours I described above (you arenít) your technique isnít going to be perfect. So when are fighting someone, how long will your muscles last till they burn out. When you are trying to finish a choke, how long till your arms give, when you are boxing, how long till you strikes have little power behind them. Just because you have the strength for the first minute, doesnít mean you can continue the rest of the round, or the next 4 rounds. Once you canít put any power behind your throws, strikes or joint locks, your technique really doesnít matter.


    To learn to fight, you need to fightÖ.a lot

    If you arenít sparring for at least 30 minutes every training session, then start. It is the only way to polish your techniques to the point they are usable against some trying to attack you. If you come from a school where you learning techniques that are too dangerous to spar with, then stop reading, you are too fucking stupid for this article. Go find a site where you can join people who think natural oils cure cancer or vaccines cause autism and all you morons can be together. For the rest of us, to learn to fight you need to fight. Choose whichever ruleset you want and go for it. The rules are there to allow you work on technique against a fully resisting opponent trying to do the same to you without getting injured so you can do it again next round, and then again the next day. Swimmers swim, Lifters Lift, and Fighters Fight. If you want to play the ďIím a Martial Artist not a FighterĒ card you can, but let me leave you with this, you can be a Fighter without being a Martial Artist, but you canít be a Martial Artist without being a Fighter.
    how do you comment. lol

  2. #102

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    Have you been stalking me again?

  3. #103

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    How come this says "ViolentTendency read me!" ? I think I'm missing something here...

  4. #104

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    -

    Oh, I see - does it say that for everyone, with their username substituted in?

    I've had a few amateur MT fights, some hayseed bareknuckle fights for pocket change, and a lot of bar brawls, street fights etc. for which I have paid my (apparent) debt to society, crock of **** though that notion really is when you think about it. But either way, my background/experience is what it is. I'm not a great fighter or a wunderkind or anything. Win, lose or draw I usually stand my ground though.

    Any decent pro would paste me up pretty quickly, I should think. I'm not gonna kid myself here lol.

  5. #105
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
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    This is an older thread but I missed it the first time around so I'll comment now. Good OP, by the way.

    I think another factor that I haven't seen mentioned is the age at which a person begins training and their commitment over the long haul, beginning at a young age. Virtually every sport in the world is dominated by people who have dedicated their whole lives to it. The idea of a dude starting to play football as a young adult and being a QB in the same stratosphere as Peyton Manning or Tom Brady is fucking ludicrous.

    Why do people think martial arts or fighting would be any different? This will continue to become more obvious in MMA and jiu jitsu as those sports continue to grow.

  6. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    This is an older thread but I missed it the first time around so I'll comment now. Good OP, by the way.

    I think another factor that I haven't seen mentioned is the age at which a person begins training and their commitment over the long haul, beginning at a young age. Virtually every sport in the world is dominated by people who have dedicated their whole lives to it. The idea of a dude starting to play football as a young adult and being a QB in the same stratosphere as Peyton Manning or Tom Brady is fucking ludicrous.

    Why do people think martial arts or fighting would be any different? This will continue to become more obvious in MMA and jiu jitsu as those sports continue to grow.
    We get walk on's "late" in the game to high school wrestling and even college wrestling that end up doing fairly well.
    They usually have solid exposures to other sports, though.
    Football and Gymanastics being two of our common areas of pick up from other sports in the US.
    Occasionally we also get a Judo kid come over who has a lot of fun introducing his wrestling opponents to ashi-waza without a gi,
    sometimes with great effect.
    It's true that a lot of kids that start wrestling in grade school too, particularly in the Northeast.
    The trouble with starting otherwise promising kids too young in competitive contact sports with intense training programs,
    is the burn out rate and premature injury rate can be pretty high.
    In particular, while the limbs are in their period of rapid growth,
    permanent growth plate injuries or long term injuries to the complex joints occur frequently.
    A lot of Olympic wrestlers recommend giving kids a solid foundation in a wide selection of other sports,
    and then putting the kids into wrestling around 8th grade.
    Last edited by WFMurphyPhD; 5/26/2016 8:53am at .

  7. #107
    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten. supporting member
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    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    We get walk on's "late" in the game to high school wrestling and even college wrestling that end up doing fairly well.
    They usually have solid exposures to other sports, though.
    Football and Gymanastics being two of our common areas of pick up from other sports in the US.
    Occasionally we also get a Judo kid come over who has a lot of fun introducing his wrestling opponents to ashi-waza without a gi,
    sometimes with great effect.
    It's true that a lot of kids that start wrestling in grade school too, particularly in the Northeast.
    The trouble with starting otherwise promising kids too young in competitive contact sports with intense training programs,
    is the burn out rate and premature injury rate can be pretty high.
    In particular, while the limbs are in their period of rapid growth,
    permanent growth plate injuries or long term injuries to the complex joints occur frequently.
    A lot of Olympic wrestlers recommend giving kids a solid foundation in a wide selection of other sports,
    and then putting the kids into wrestling around 8th grade.
    But walk ons that do fairly well are a far cry from what I'm referring to. I don't disagree with that. But I'm talking about the highest levels of a sport. You may get the occasional anomaly that rises to that level with a late start but they're going to be the exception, not the rule. And I think this becomes more true the more widespread a sport becomes.

    Mental burnout is always an issue but it's no more of an issue with kids in combat sports than it is with any other kid that is working their ass off at the highest level possible in any other sport. The kids who weather that or who have coaches that find a way to make it fun are the ones who have the opportunity to rise to the top. It's not going to be everybody, for sure. That's the whole point.

    Injuries are not a reason not to prepare for combat sports. Injuries are a reason to prepare differently for those sports. If that's lighter training, then it's lighter training. If it's cross training in other sports, then it's cross training in other sports. My point is that the kids who start early with competent coaches and intelligently pursue the goal of achieving a high level in a given sport are the ones who have the best opportunity to reach an elite level. That doesn't mean they have to be beating each other's brains in every training session.

    I don't really consider a kid who starts wrestling in 8th grade with an athletic foundation already in place to be that much of a late starter. I specifically mentioned people starting as young adults. That's late in the game if you're trying to reach an elite level.

  8. #108
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    I'll just drop this here.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
    We get walk on's "late" in the game to high school wrestling and even college wrestling that end up doing fairly well.
    They usually have solid exposures to other sports, though.
    Football and Gymanastics being two of our common areas of pick up from other sports in the US.
    Occasionally we also get a Judo kid come over who has a lot of fun introducing his wrestling opponents to ashi-waza without a gi,
    sometimes with great effect.
    It's true that a lot of kids that start wrestling in grade school too, particularly in the Northeast.
    The trouble with starting otherwise promising kids too young in competitive contact sports with intense training programs,
    is the burn out rate and premature injury rate can be pretty high.
    In particular, while the limbs are in their period of rapid growth,
    permanent growth plate injuries or long term injuries to the complex joints occur frequently.
    A lot of Olympic wrestlers recommend giving kids a solid foundation in a wide selection of other sports,
    and then putting the kids into wrestling around 8th grade.
    I'll drop this in here again, I've posted these links before.

    Kids who start out early being active, playing different sports, whose lives are focused on physical activity instead of playing video games or watching TV, are going to have a huge jump on kids who do not do so, or who start later in life.

    http://www.judocanada.org/long-term-...lopment-model/

    Read that stuff, all of it, and let it sink in. I'm sure Bill will be familiar with it, as he got a lot of flack for making the essentially same assertions about BJJ, if I recall correctly.

    Also note that the average age of olympic level judoka, to start judo training was 13 or 14....Judo is a "late development" sport (as compared to say, women's gymnastics). Of course, some judo and wrestling kids start when they are little kids and go on to be world class/elite level. Outliers happen...

    I will say that I've seen the results with my own boys. Neither their Mom nor I are outstanding athletes, decent, yes, better than average, probably so. Neither of us has outstanding genetics in terms of muscle mass or conformation for any particular sport.

    But my kids grew up outside, being active hours a day outside of school, and even the school they go to has 3 recesses a day (grade school), and in middle school they have PE and advanced PE, which my older son does. They grew up watching very little TV, no video games at all, and some mostly educational DVDs/Video. Default was to go outside and play. They played soccer as organized sport since they were 4 years old, ride bikes, horses, (and goats in the case of my younger son, LOL) have gone through the Canadian Red Cross swimming program, , hiking, camping, doing chores, have a trampoline to jump on, shoot bow and arrow, pellet/bb rifles, .22 rimfire, shotguns, and yeah, high powered rifles and sling shots, slings (that the make) and atl-atl, play lacrosse (see my Dad-bragging video, LOL), and now Judo and BJJ.

    And you know what I see now ? I see two boys, neither of which has any sort of outstanding physical conformation in terms of structure or genetics (neither has fully hit puberty yet, but structure wise, doesn't look like it), but both are in good shape with very little body fat and defined musculature (as in six pack abs at 11 and 12, something I sure as hell never had!). The 12 year old can do 15 or 20 pullups...

    But somehow, both of them essentially run circles around and through 90% of their peers when it comes to competitive athletics.

    One thing they DO get from both parents is examples of motivation and hard work balanced with having fun. OK, both of us (although no longer married to each other) would really rather have fun that work, LOL!

    LTAD is where it's at, whether you want to eventually be an elite athlete (which requires a strong dose of masochism and crazy, IMO and IME) or just a healthy and active human being for life.


    Yeah, I'm bragging, but there is a point other than my own ego aggrandizement. So cut me some slack, I don't get much of that or allow myself much of that.
    Last edited by BKR; 5/26/2016 11:05am at .
    Falling for Judo since 1980

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  10. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Devil View Post
    But walk ons that do fairly well are a far cry from what I'm referring to. I don't disagree with that. But I'm talking about the highest levels of a sport. You may get the occasional anomaly that rises to that level with a late start but they're going to be the exception, not the rule. And I think this becomes more true the more widespread a sport becomes.

    Mental burnout is always an issue but it's no more of an issue with kids in combat sports than it is with any other kid that is working their ass off at the highest level possible in any other sport. The kids who weather that or who have coaches that find a way to make it fun are the ones who have the opportunity to rise to the top. It's not going to be everybody, for sure. That's the whole point.

    Injuries are not a reason not to prepare for combat sports. Injuries are a reason to prepare differently for those sports. If that's lighter training, then it's lighter training. If it's cross training in other sports, then it's cross training in other sports. My point is that the kids who start early with competent coaches and intelligently pursue the goal of achieving a high level in a given sport are the ones who have the best opportunity to reach an elite level. That doesn't mean they have to be beating each other's brains in every training session.

    I don't really consider a kid who starts wrestling in 8th grade with an athletic foundation already in place to be that much of a late starter. I specifically mentioned people starting as young adults. That's late in the game if you're trying to reach an elite level.
    Nope, not a late starter at all for a kid with a solid athletic foundation for judo, wrestling, or BJJ, all of which are late development sports (physical peak in mid-20s, require 10 years to get to that technical level).

    Start at 18 or 19, success is for outliers only.
    Falling for Judo since 1980

    "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

    "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

    "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

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