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    A BJJ guy walks in to a Judo dojo



    Anyway the guy had 3 years BJJ experience and the class started with Newaza and I was paired with him. Bloody hell he was good but I really enjoyed getting dominated on the ground and he was trying to show off he was just doing what any BJJ guy would do. I think he was a bit surprised when he got side control on me and then went to full mount only to be told by the Instructor that he should have gone for Mune-gatame (chest hold) instead. I still find it hard not to go for subs instead of pins/holds because I watch so much BJJ in MMA/UFC so I can only imagine how difficult and frustrating it will be for a BJJ guy not to go for the sub.


    #2
    Originally posted by bigstu31s View Post
    Bloody hell he was good but I really enjoyed getting dominated


    I hope he comes back for more as it was a pleasure rolling with the guy
    you haz t3h gh3y



    ..on a serious note, wait till it comes to randori and return the favour.

    he can learn from you too
    "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
    Spoiler:

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      #3
      It's not showing off, it's fighting for the sub.

      When I train Judo and I get Kesa Gatame on my oponent or trainingpartner, I always add the Robinson Lock. Doesn't mean that I execute the Robinson Lock, but now I can change my hold in an instant to a finishing move.
      Originally posted by Jiujitsu77
      You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
      Originally posted by Humanzee
      ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
      Originally posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
      It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
      The real deadly:

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        #4
        Originally posted by MMAMickey View Post
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        you haz t3h gh3y



        ..on a serious note, wait till it comes to randori and return the favour.

        he can learn from you too
        absolutely,he's probably joined to learn the Judo throws

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          #5
          Or he's grooming you.

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            #6
            Well, again, we need to decide on context.

            If its about "no rules" or "anything goes" or "real fight," shoot him when his back is turned and he is tying his belt.

            All else is about rules. In a Judo dojo its about Judo rules.

            In Judo the context is to secure a position that scores, meaning the pin clock is moving. Once that happens, its ok to look for a submission, as long as you don't give up the scoring position. If you are about to lose the scoring position, then by al means attempt the submission, or switch your position.

            I am sure there is another set of guidelines in the BJJ school as to what scores under the rules of BJJ. So if you are doing BJJ, then you should learn and follow what scores under those rules.
            "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC

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              #7
              I agree he can learn from you too. Specially the throws.

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                #8
                Rules make games. Still, a guy with 3 years of BJJ is probably a middle-ranked blule belt. He's probably going to be tearing up most judoka below shodan unless you have a club with particularly good ne waza (I do, fortunately).

                Your typical BJJ practitioner is going to attempt to get to two positions above all else: mount (tate shiho gatame) and back mount (no formal judo name; from the back with both insteps in your thighs) because these are the two highest scoring positions in BJJ. So he went for mount because that's what BJJ trained him to do.

                He might also pop up into knee on belly, which is actually a disfavored position in modern Judo competition because it does not count as a pin and moving to it would stop the pin clock. It's a nasty position though.

                Alternatively, he'll play guard. Passing the guard also scores points, so BJJ guys almost invariably have good guards and decent guard passing skills.

                On the other hand, lower ranked BJJ guys tend to be a bit weak attacking and defending the turtle/sprawl relative to Judo guys -- aside from going for and defending back mount.

                In Judo, all pins score equally and back mount doesn't score. So why give up a good position unless your opponent forces you to? I can see why your instructor would want him to move to mune gatame over mount -- it's probably a more secure pin (it is for me, at least).

                In both Judo and BJJ, I, personally, secure position before I go submission hunting unless it's there for the taking. Both Judo and BJJ teach position before submission.

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                  #9
                  FYI: Knee on Belly

                  The history of this position is often over looked. There is NO way to train it as it was really used.

                  Think of it this way; you throw someone really hard, then LAND in knee on belly. Its used to be taught as a dynamic entry follow up from a throw...

                  ...the impact would almost insure that ukes hands would come up to push that knee off, and open the submission.

                  PLEASE do not land on people that way, but do play with it gently.
                  "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Dave Camarillo's book teaches KoB in precisely that way. He calls it the "impact control" position, and is a big advocate of immediately attacking from there with the grips you have. I'm a great admirer of his tactics -- it's very much the way Judo should be.

                    Yamashita was so great, in part, due to his outstanding ability to transition from tachi waza to ne waza. He won a large percentage of his matches -- including his gold medal match -- with yoko shiho gatame. It came in part, I understand, by frequently allowing tachi waza to transition to ne waza in randori -- something missing in a lot of Judo clubs (probably due to space).

                    I loathe the modern weak rolling ippon . ..

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                      #11
                      judo book

                      What is the title of the book? If I can find it even as an ebook I wouldn't mind adding it to my collection for referance.

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                        #12
                        I think it's called guerrilla jiu-jitsu if I'm thinking of the same book that Res is. Don't own but I flipped through it once and it looked excellent, I really regret not buying it.

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                          #13
                          This one?

                          Amazon.com: Guerrilla Jiu-Jitsu: Revolutionizing Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (9780977731589): Dave Camarillo, Erich Krauss:…

                          I was looking at that too. Recommended, or just further pulp on the already groaning shelf?

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Thanks

                            Originally posted by BaronVonDingDong View Post
                            This one?



                            I was looking at that too. Recommended, or just further pulp on the already groaning shelf?
                            Thanks for the info. You know, one can find many martial arts related books via ebook for free through ebookee. Maybe it is there and if not, i would purchase it.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              It's ... okay. A third of it is Judo for Dummies (i.e. BJJ players). A third of it is flying attacks that I'll never be able to do. The best part is the middle with the attacks from the impact control position.

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