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BJJ vs. Japanese JJ

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    BJJ vs. Japanese JJ

    Can someone please explain to me the difference between Japanese JJ and BJJ?

    From what I gather, it seems like Japanese JJ also teaches strikes, kicks, and throws, whereas BJJ is just ground fighting?

    Also, which style would be better to learn for street fighting?

    Thanks.

    #2
    Japanese JJ is usually a toss up in quality. Check this video out, if you don't understand this principle you won't be able to distinguish good MA from bad MA.

    YouTube- Words of Wisdom PT 1

    BJJ does just teach groundfighting, however it highly encourages cross-training and depending on the gym the Blackbelt will be a former wrestler or have a judo black belt.

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      #3
      http://www.grapplearts.com/Submissio...s-ju-jutsu.htm

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        #4
        Great video, thanks.

        The more research I do, the more it seems like the most effective combo for real street fighting skills is BJJ and Muy Thai. I just wish one of them also included pressure point type shit.

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          #5
          Originally posted by declaw View Post
          Great video, thanks.

          The more research I do, the more it seems like the most effective combo for real street fighting skills is BJJ and Muy Thai. I just wish one of them also included pressure point type shit.
          You got 2/3rds of that equation right (training in a system that includes lots of sparring and full contact competitions). In your own words what is pressure point type shit?

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            #6
            I mean the kind of close contact strikes and chokes to someones throat, arteries, wrists, etc. Not like joint locks or anything, but more like learning where to apply pressure with your hands and fingers on a person that really fucking hurts them, in order to get away in a self defense situation.

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              #7
              Originally posted by declaw View Post
              I mean the kind of close contact strikes and chokes to someones throat, arteries, wrists, etc. Not like joint locks or anything, but more like learning where to apply pressure with your hands and fingers on a person that really fucking hurts them, in order to get away in a self defense situation.
              A quick glance at the ever-reliable wikipedia reminded me of koppojutsu (bone attacks) and koshijutsu (nerve attacks), two components of taijutsu/jujutsu. If you have a JJJ place in mind you should ask the instructor(s) if/how they approach those two things. That said any striking art should teach you how to adjust the effect of a single technique by varying the target.

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                #8
                Originally posted by David Koresh Jr. View Post
                Japanese JJ is usually a toss up in quality. Check this video out, if you don't understand this principle you won't be able to distinguish good MA from bad MA.

                YouTube- Words of Wisdom PT 1

                BJJ does just teach groundfighting, however it highly encourages cross-training and depending on the gym the Blackbelt will be a former wrestler or have a judo black belt.
                the problem with finding good Japanese Jujutsu that's going to teach you anything worthwhile in a timely fashion is actually finding it.

                If you ask me, it's actually better to go find a Judo school that teaches more than just competition judo. It'll be easier than trying to get some BJJ instructor to get off of the ground and teach good stand-up.
                Seriously, go find a good Judo school and spend a bit of time doing stand-up and newaza. THEN go find a BJJ school once you have a ground foundation.
                You'll be a lot better off and have some quality skills.
                "Judo is a study of techniques with which you may kill if you wish to kill, injure if you wish to injure, subdue if you wish to subdue, and, when attacked, defend yourself" - Jigoro Kano (1889)
                ***Was this quote "taken out of context"?***

                "The judoist has no time to allow himself a margin for error, especially in a situation upon which his or another person's very life depends...."
                ~ The Secret of Judo (Jiichi Watanabe & Lindy Avakian), p.19

                "Hope is not a method... nor is enthusiasm."
                ~ Brigadier General Gordon Toney

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                  #9
                  Punching someone so they are kocked out, and choking someone out, are all the pressure points you need to know.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by declaw View Post
                    I mean the kind of close contact strikes and chokes to someones throat, arteries, wrists, etc. Not like joint locks or anything, but more like learning where to apply pressure with your hands and fingers on a person that really fucking hurts them, in order to get away in a self defense situation.
                    As yoj just pointed out your much better off just applying allot of pressure really fast to the face / jaw. As far as chokes go your bound to learn plenty at any judo bjj or good jjj place you go so no need to worry about that.

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                      #11
                      Pressure points (kyusho jitsu in Japanese, if you care) is more of a 'nice to have' skill than a need to have skill. I don't know the exact numbers...but there is a percentage of people on which most, or some, pressure points simply don't work. There are even more people who simply don't give a shit if you are applying an infraorbital, mandibular angle, or whatever pressure point...either because they are seething with adrenaline or drunk/high.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by daishi View Post
                        Pressure points (kyusho jitsu in Japanese, if you care) is more of a 'nice to have' skill than a need to have skill. I don't know the exact numbers...but there is a percentage of people on which most, or some, pressure points simply don't work. There are even more people who simply don't give a shit if you are applying an infraorbital, mandibular angle, or whatever pressure point...either because they are seething with adrenaline or drunk/high.
                        My best friend's like that. Try and apply a "pressure point" technique to him and he'll just stand there smiling. He stubs his toe on the edge of a chair and he's on the floor crying. Go figure.

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                          #13
                          I study both.

                          I think you have to define terms when you say "Japanese Jujitsu" though...

                          Almost always when people tell me they study "JJJ" they actually study a style of American Jujitsu.

                          Actual JAPANESE Jujutsu (as practiced in Japan) is pretty rare in the U.S., compared to all the post WWII styles based on Judo & whatever else.

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                            #14
                            Judo + Muay Thai would be the most practical solution. You'll get good strikes + clinch game + throws + fundamental groundwork.

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                              #15
                              Don't let yourself get pulled in by the pressure point hype you'll see on the internet. There is a hell of a lot evidence that suggests that these things do not work under pressure.

                              Think about it, what would you rather do? Fiddle about trying to find the pressure point along someone's clavicle and hope they don't hit you or drive your fist into their face and slam them into the floor (in the immortal words of Mr Tripp) so hard their parents die?

                              Trust me, I studied pressure points in Kung Fu for years and the only thing they're good for is suckering your mates in the pub.
                              " The reason elite level MMAists don't fight with aikido is the same reason elite level swimmers don't swim with their lips." - Virus

                              " I shocked him with my skills on the ice becuase Wing Chun is great for hockey fighting." - 'Sifu' Milt Wallace

                              "Besides, as you might already know (from Virus, for example) - there's only 1 wing chun and it sucks big time" - Tonuzaba

                              "Even when I'm promising mayhem and butt-chicanery, I'm generally posting with a smile on my face." - Sochin101

                              "That said, if he blocked my hip on a drop nage, I would extend my leg into a drop tai Otoshi and slam him so hard his parents would die." - MTripp

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