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"Dirty Fighting" by Lt. David W. Morrah jr available through the week

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    "Dirty Fighting" by Lt. David W. Morrah jr available through the week

    Pete Kautz of Alliance Martial Arts is hosting a free download for this great old book:
    http://www.alliancemartialarts.com/weeklyspecial.htm

    As an artist, I really like the illustration style throughout the book (especially the anatomy chart ones). Apparently this manual has more of a catch wresting influence than some of the other WW2 combatives manuals. I kinda study these old manuals as a hobby, and this is one that I hadn't heard of but have enjoyed reading this week.

    #2
    thanks for the link!

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      #3
      Very interesting. Thanks for the link!!

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        #4
        There's a lot more grappling technique and emphasis in this one than the other WW2 combatives manuals out there. While most of them advocate striking to sensitive areas until they fall then stomping them out, this one takes the approach that hitting those points is difficult with an upright resisting opponent, so you should put them on the ground first.

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          #5
          Nice, I'm going to give this a read. Thanks

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            #6
            Yeah, this one looks to have some pretty good techniques for the time. It is actually better than some stuff that is out today! I especially like the pictures. Like the one that looks like hitler. And the teeth on the other one!!

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              #7
              Why was there so much emphasis on using the knife-hand for striking during WWII? Wasn't boxing still popular?

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                #8
                Originally posted by Eudemic View Post
                Why was there so much emphasis on using the knife-hand for striking during WWII? Wasn't boxing still popular?
                A number of the authors spoke highly of boxing, but I guess the idea was to teach the most destructive skills in the shortest time, and developing the correct technique to punch with the fist was thought to take too much time. They were also considering bareknuckle strikes against a guy with various clothes and armor. I think the edge of hand strike is a pretty nifty thing to have in the arsenal and I train them on a number of mediums. I even throw them into the sparring mix, but obviously they have to be used a little differently. I wonder if the shuto will ever end up in MMA.

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                  #9
                  It also occurs to me that in a lot of the manuals, the edge of the hand is also used as a fairly intuitive way to knock things out of the way, like an outstretched weapon arm, and this comes up fairly often in the context of the fighting they were envisioning (ie lots of hand weapons coming into play).

                  I have a pretty funny story about the edge of the hand and WW2 combatives stuff, and it happened earlier today. I was at the DMV for some registration stuff, and I noticed that there was exactly 50 people who's numbers came up before mine. While waiting, I got my small laptop and was reading old pdfs. A cute little girl, looked about 5, started looking over my shoulder. I was going through Arwrology, and decided I should keep to text heavy pages so she wouldn't see a bunch of fighting pictures. Being a kid at the DMV, she gets antsy and starts pacing around and being a kid, and out of nowhere, she chops her dad in the throat and he gags a little, and she feels bad about it. She was so little it didn't do too much. I folded up my laptop and waited quietly.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by CodosDePiedra View Post
                    I have a pretty funny story about the edge of the hand and WW2 combatives stuff, and it happened earlier today. I was at the DMV for some registration stuff, and I noticed that there was exactly 50 people who's numbers came up before mine. While waiting, I got my small laptop and was reading old pdfs. A cute little girl, looked about 5, started looking over my shoulder. I was going through Arwrology, and decided I should keep to text heavy pages so she wouldn't see a bunch of fighting pictures. Being a kid at the DMV, she gets antsy and starts pacing around and being a kid, and out of nowhere, she chops her dad in the throat and he gags a little, and she feels bad about it. She was so little it didn't do too much. I folded up my laptop and waited quietly.
                    You remember what happened to a certain Greek Philosopher for corrupting the youth, right?

                    (On the plus side, said philosopher could say, at least, that it was an "all natural" product. ;) )

                    Peace favor your sword,
                    Kirk

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by lklawson View Post
                      You remember what happened to a certain Greek Philosopher for corrupting the youth, right?

                      (On the plus side, said philosopher could say, at least, that it was an "all natural" product. ;) )

                      Peace favor your sword,
                      Kirk
                      I also fail to acknowledge the gods of the city.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by CodosDePiedra View Post
                        I also fail to acknowledge the gods of the city.
                        Here, drink this. Don't worry. It's "all natural." ;)

                        Peace favor your sword,
                        Kirk

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                          #13
                          Mmm, flowery...

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Eudemic View Post
                            Why was there so much emphasis on using the knife-hand for striking during WWII? Wasn't boxing still popular?
                            My grandfather grew up in the Great Depression. He said that football and boxing were really the only "contact" sports in his youth that were available.

                            He fought Golden Gloves to the NC semifinals sometime in the late 1930's.

                            After serving three years in the Navy, he was discharged and sworn into the OSS (Jan. 1945). While on a destroyer bound for Calcutta, India, he was trained in a CQB similar to the Fairbairn style. He told me the chop hands worked as double muscle memory if you added a knife. My grandpa liked these strikes and he was in love with boxing prior to WW2. To box, I guess you would need a push dagger or something curved. He carried a Fairbairn/Sykes dagger and 2 trench knives for blades, (he was issued these).

                            Grandpa served out his tour in Kunming, China until the end of the war. In all, his CQB training in unarmed, blade, and firearms was 90 days. His unit was under SACO. Check it out... interesting history.

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                              #15
                              The knife or ax hand as taught to U.S. military in WW II probably came from W.E. Fairbairn. According to Wiki, he was a Brit stationed in Shanghai, China, in 1907. He studied Jiu-Jitsu and Chinese martial arts. He retired from there in 1940 as Assistant Commissioner at 55 years of age. He went on to teach combatives to Allied Forces in WWII. At some point in his Shanghai career, possibly fairly early, he became head of police training.

                              Shanghai was one rough place during Fairbairn's tour. Wiki sez he was involved in 600 non-training fights. I've seen elsewhere he had something like 200 of his policemen were killed in action.

                              He boiled his MA training down to some specific techniques that worked. And they trained hard at those basic techniques. Everything from fighting, controlling a prisoner, to pistol-craft.

                              I've read he broke his systems down to subsystems after war. Teaching the killer techniques more to the military. And less lethal techniques to civilians.

                              The general name for the style is "Combatives." Or Close Quarters Combat. In years past people called it Combat Judo. Some old references were just Judo or Dirty Fighting. I'm gaining the opinion that some of the pre-WWII style terms were not as highly defined in the West as they are today. As today Judo basically means sport Judo. And I doubt you'll be learning to gouge an eye out in the first lesson of sport Judo. Fairbairn's kicks are basically shin stomps, foot stomps, and groin. Bone breaking stuff by design.

                              There is a good chance that Fairbairn's books are out there in the public domain. Esp the ones written by the military, as they are always public domain. Unless some company re-sells it at an outrageously high price and in the process copyrights the reprinted old material under their name. So you can have the exact same book in both free public domain version and copyrighted version. So be careful if you DL an e-book copy. It is very easy to re-copy right an old book. Just add your company name, like, copyright 2010 Rip-Off Re-prints, to the book or each page. That changes it. And it is automatically covered. Ya might have to add or change a sentence or picture. Do your homework. Don't DL someone else's copyrighted stuff.

                              Fairbairn also designed a famous WWII dagger w/ Sykes. It has a collectible value. Just know that the real knife had a weak tip and didn't hold up as well as the legend indicates. I believe a Bowie design replaced it at some point in time. Probably first by personal choice by the more experienced Commandos. The Bowie's spine makes a stronger knife w/ a stronger tip than a thin tipped dagger. The evolved Bowie is about as far as knife evolution got before handguns replaced the long knife as a sidearm. Don't confuse a fighting Bowie w/ a big old heavy brush chopper camp Bowie. Bowie's are interesting in that the more the features are exaggerated, the more handsome and appealing they become. Fighting Bowies tend to be long and slim. Looking more like an evolved bayonet than a brush chopper. The are FAST. And balance is forward the guard an inch or more. Look at Ontario Knife Co's Hell's Belle for an example.

                              If you search Combatives or CQC you'll find people like E.A. Sykes, Charles Nelson, G.E. Perrigard, Carl Cestari, Rex Applegate and many others, as they trained many people who continued training after the war. Knife or ax hand, cupped hand, palm, palm claw, hammer fist, stomps, elbows, joint locks, escort ... yada.

                              Every major European country pretty much had people in Shanghai before WWII. They all learned stuff there. So there are other routes for the knife hand to come to U.S. or any Euro forces, but probably less documented or generally well known.

                              I'm pretty sure I've see pre-1900 references to Jiu-Jitsu in western literature, like Bartitsu.

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