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    Another Bujinkan Question

    In Bujinkan training the standard is no sparring. Why is that so?

    #2
    It seems that part of the reason is a "Lowest common denominator" factor. Most of the people attracted to the Bujinkan are not in the shape or at the level of skill to be able to use the methods taught in an alive manner without seriously injuring each other. Since most of them are training only as a hobby rather then encourage them to get themselves hurt the general trend has been to pat them on the head and tell them they don't need to.

    You'll find the odd group that does spar, or at least train in a relatively alive manner. You'll also find groups that may not do that themselves but will encourage crosstraining and even competative fighting, to get that aspect integrated into students' skillsets. Both are unfortunately very rare.

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      #3
      Originally posted by JTR
      In Bujinkan training the standard is no sparring. Why is that so?

      What style of Jujutsu do you do?
      How do you spar?

      Comment


        #4
        I'm new to martial arts. I've been studing MT, BJJ, some Judo, and some generic stand up jujutsu. They've started me out sparring 3 minute rounds. For example on Saturdays we start with warm up drills, then move on to finer points of things we've been working on, then sparring for the rest of the class. Judo sparring we do with and without gi's. same with BJJ. When we do MT standard boxing gloves are used and we wear head gear. When we ground fight we go to tap out, or if not much is going on we get restarted. When it comes to MT basicly we are just learning how to strike, take a hit, and working on endurance as of now.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Fitz
          It seems that part of the reason is a "Lowest common denominator" factor. Most of the people attracted to the Bujinkan are not in the shape or at the level of skill to be able to use the methods taught in an alive manner without seriously injuring each other. Since most of them are training only as a hobby rather then encourage them to get themselves hurt the general trend has been to pat them on the head and tell them they don't need to.

          You'll find the odd group that does spar, or at least train in a relatively alive manner. You'll also find groups that may not do that themselves but will encourage crosstraining and even competative fighting, to get that aspect integrated into students' skillsets. Both are unfortunately very rare.
          Thanks for the answser Fitz.

          Comment


            #6
            The Bujinkan standard is no sparring SOMETIMES... usually they dont because of their reason of their art being too destructive of the human body, but really my sensei will let us spar and lets us hit each other, just not full force...but enough to make you go "ow! im not doing that again". Personally i LOVE the sparring and the class i go to, currently im looking for another MA to crosstrain in...

            Thanks,
            Lone Wind

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              #7
              Some Bujinkan practitioners "including myself" utilize a derivative of sparring, but its more of a open ended, free response "anything goes" exercise without a point system and a winner and loser.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Talon987
                Some Bujinkan practitioners "including myself" utilize a derivative of sparring, but its more of a open ended, free response "anything goes" exercise without a point system and a winner and loser.
                Wouldn't want to hurt anybodies feelings, after all; everybody's a winner! When you're done, do you all get together, hold hands, and tell each other how great you all are?
                <insert witty comment>

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by rw4th
                  Wouldn't want to hurt anybodies feelings, after all; everybody's a winner! When you're done, do you all get together, hold hands, and tell each other how great you all are?
                  Last time I checked, no one "won" at sparring anyway

                  Unless you train at an excessively competitive gym.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by rw4th
                    Wouldn't want to hurt anybodies feelings, after all; everybody's a winner! When you're done, do you all get together, hold hands, and tell each other how great you all are?
                    Uh yeah unless your a dick. Even if you kick someones ass you still give them some credit and props. And I see this very often when people compete in mma, always give your opponent credit.
                    Check out my blog!:

                    http://jadonbjj.blogspot.com/

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by JTR
                      I'm new to martial arts. I've been studing MT, BJJ, some Judo, and some generic stand up jujutsu.
                      Off topic but if you do ALL of the above arts, why do you just have 'Jujutsu' in your style field?
                      "I'm reluctant to sound like a total fa66ot as well, but my background in sculpture gave me an edge in understanding how we're expected to move thru space." - The Other Other Serge

                      Comment


                        #12
                        In the last few months we have had a few BJK students come from other dojos (tht do no alive training) to train with us. All of them have taken part in our sparring/randori. All have taken part in our pressure testing and resistnace drills.

                        All have done poorly.

                        Yet all have commented that while they felt that type of training to be refreshing and an eye opener, they wouldn't want to make it a routine part of their training...


                        Curious.
                        :nobodycar

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Rubber Tanto

                          Yet all have commented that while they felt that type of training to be refreshing and an eye opener, they wouldn't want to make it a routine part of their training...


                          Curious.
                          :nobodycar
                          There is the myth in the bujinkan that any sparring creates bad habits.
                          Habits that will impede your ability to deal with "real combat."

                          Its mainly pushed by the us vs them crowd, who need the excuse in order to maintain their power base.
                          The high ranks would eventually lose sparring matches to lower ranks. And that would strip them of their carefully crafted mystique.

                          ANother reason is that most dont know how to go about sparring.
                          They see sparring as either like this---->

                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UVtRHvED4NI


                          or this----->
                          http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=77gibNeT5hI



                          They dont see the middle ground...and they dont know how to go about it.
                          So they ignore it...and continue the street vs sport nonsense.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by Rubber Tanto
                            In the last few months we have had a few BJK students come from other dojos (tht do no alive training) to train with us. All of them have taken part in our sparring/randori. All have taken part in our pressure testing and resistnace drills.

                            All have done poorly.

                            Yet all have commented that while they felt that type of training to be refreshing and an eye opener, they wouldn't want to make it a routine part of their training...


                            Curious.
                            :nobodycar
                            <insert witty comment>

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Lily
                              Off topic but if you do ALL of the above arts, why do you just have 'Jujutsu' in your style field?
                              Japanese jujutsu systems typically place more emphasis on throwing, immobilizing and pinning, joint-locking, choking, and strangling techniques (as compared with other martial arts systems such as karate). Atemi-waza (striking techniques) were seen as less important in most older Japanese systems, since samurai body armor protected against many striking techniques. The Chinese quanfa/ch'uan-fa (kenpo or kung fu) systems focus on punching, striking, and kicking more than jujutsu.

                              I only put Jujutsu because my back ground as been most like jujutsu focusing on the first part of the discription. Including Judo, BJJ, and stand up grappling. After a few months I added MT because my striking was shit. So I just put Jujutsu to keep it simple.

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