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Kung-fu in MMA....This is how I got here.

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    Thanks for sharing guys!

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      Kung-fu to me was all about training with whoever would come along, like the Shaolin Temple. These ideas of only training one way under one sifu? Well my sifu was never like that I had many sihungs and each taught me something different.
      I just wanted to comment on your last paragraph, Omega, when you said that kung fu is about who you train with, and I definitely agree with that statement. You develop your own kung fu, since the term "kung fu" translates to "(skill achieved through) hard work." You can have kung fu from doing your forms and doing stance work and bridge work, etc, or you can do that along with having friends that did/do a lot of wrestling in high school and you work on a farm throwing hay bails all day. You get your own kung fu based on what you work hard to gain. You could even describe it as different flavors of the same dish, or as my sifu describes it, math. A lot of people like to do addition and subtraction "on steroids," but we want to throw you some vector calculus to figure out when we touch hands. I'm a small dude, easily the smallest guy in the adult class in my school, so when I train against the guy that's a good foot taller than I am, much faster and athletic than I am, AND 100lbs heavier, I need to have strategies against him that are different from when I fight the guy that's my height and 20lbs heavier.

      I hope this made some sense, as I wanted to just reiterate that point you made, which I think is great. Thanks for sharing your biography. I may have missed this while reading, but what's your hung ga sifu's name?

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        Go to the advanced striking section and I'll be more than happy to address the issue.

        For the record, when you use the term kung fu, as per your first part of your paragraph, that's pretty much how I see things too.

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          Hi all, great thread. I also started out with Kung Fu (the style was called Hung Kuen) and was based on 5 animals. I then moved onto many other styles 6 years later was fighting in the UFC. Now I have gone full circle back to my kung fu roots, and concentrate on the Chinese Internal Styles.
          you can check my fighting highlights on youtube

          nick osipczak

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            Originally posted by raisedspirit View Post
            Hi all, great thread. I also started out with Kung Fu (the style was called Hung Kuen) and was based on 5 animals. I then moved onto many other styles 6 years later was fighting in the UFC. Now I have gone full circle back to my kung fu roots, and concentrate on the Chinese Internal Styles.
            you can check my fighting highlights on youtube

            nick osipczak
            we should get you a pro fighter tag, so people don't talk a bunch of shit to you. probably the best way is to PM a moderator once you have enough posts to do so, then they will tell you the best way to prove your identity and get you a tag.

            it would be great if you could start a thread to talk about your approach to CMA now that you have had a pro fighting career. most of the CMA guys on here who have cross trained and fought full contact emphasize sparring and working with resisting opponents to really understand their techniques, even in the internal CMA styles, so it would be interesting to get your take on it.

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              Hey Nick. The funny thing is I was also supposed to be on that card for UFC. I had always wondered if they just wondered if they wanted a CMA fighter on there. Glad you found your way here.

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                Originally posted by Omega Supreme View Post
                Training under this system paved the way I would train for the rest of my life. I had always heard stories of Shaolin being told but as others were mystified by the Shaolin temple it was more of an analyzation of history for our group. What we were told was that the Shaolin temple was actually protected by actual warriors who had come to the temple seeking some 'center' in their life. Each warrior, bandit, and such would exchange ideas. Monks started to train in the martial arts brought to the temple to keep up their health and well you start to get the idea. The whole idea of some Buddha teaching the monks martial arts never really came into play.
                I know it's years later, but it's cool to hear this out after getting into The Water Margin (podcast and book). Makes the Shaolin temple seem like Liangshan marsh and the jianghu scene seem more real. Pretty gangster.

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                  Originally posted by lt_flippy View Post
                  I know it's years later, but it's cool to hear this out after getting into The Water Margin (podcast and book). Makes the Shaolin temple seem like Liangshan marsh and the jianghu scene seem more real. Pretty gangster.
                  If you haven't already another great classic to check out is Monkey (AKA Journey to the West/Xi You Ji). Together with Dreams of the Red Chamber and Romance of the Three Kingdoms, these are all considered the si da qishu (four great works) of classical Chinese literature.

                  Monsters, monks, kung fu, gods and devils. Everything you need for a great martial arts yarn.

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                    This story is awesome. I also let my Five Animal Kung Fu, Ng Ying Kungfu students spar with kickboxers and mma students. They develop great and get a much more realistic insight on fighting then just practising Ng Ying Kuen style. They learn what works and even better what does not work.

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