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    Quang/Hung Kuen?

    The university in the next town over where some of my friends live has a kung fu school. A few years back when I studied there I remember it being shown as a Hung Kuen school and it has the five animals of Hung Ga, but unlike what I usually hear of HK and its four main forms, it has broken the five animals into a form each. Since Ive moved away it has changed its description to Quang Kuen and from what I can see has Tan Tui and a lot of forms I dont recognize from my experience training at Hung Gar clubs for seminars or just generally watching videos. Could be a village style but it also says the Quang Kuen was developed in Malaysia. Im not sure if this is some bizarre branch or just a weird naming choice but its odd to me it would change style name from a few years ago.

    Theres a couple of videos on their facebook page and wondered if a more Hung inclined member knows what they are looking at.







    For reference, heres a flyer from when I was a student

    [image]https://scontent-lhr3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...b9&oe=5E445B8C[/image]

    #2
    Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
    The university in the next town over where some of my friends live has a kung fu school. A few years back when I studied there I remember it being shown as a Hung Kuen school and it has the five animals of Hung Ga, but unlike what I usually hear of HK and its four main forms, it has broken the five animals into a form each. Since Ive moved away it has changed its description to Quang Kuen and from what I can see has Tan Tui and a lot of forms I dont recognize from my experience training at Hung Gar clubs for seminars or just generally watching videos. Could be a village style but it also says the Quang Kuen was developed in Malaysia. Im not sure if this is some bizarre branch or just a weird naming choice but its odd to me it would change style name from a few years ago.

    Theres a couple of videos on their facebook page and wondered if a more Hung inclined member knows what they are looking at.
    "Hung Inclined", lol. Please, stop making me piss myself laughing with the phallic humor that Hung Kuen is famous for.

    None of your Facebook videos linked rendered (they are all non-public), so I went ahead and stripped the tags. I'll check them out, but the "4 sets" thing is specific to certain schools and not others. Some schools have 5 core fist sets. And some have even more shorter, repetitive sets based on the Five southern animals of the Southern Shaolin tradition. I learned a version of Tan Tui in a Hung Kuen school, too.

    "Kuen" isn't even a Malay word. The Malay word for "fist" (Mandarin: Quan; Canto: Kuen) is penumbuk.

    https://www.facebook.com/ashley.bret...552699858/?t=0
    https://www.facebook.com/crazydre3x3...658621601/?t=1
    https://www.facebook.com/Hassassin12...162660681/?t=0
    Last edited by W. Rabbit; 11/14/2019 10:06pm, .

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      #3

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        #4
        "Quang Kuen Shaolin Kungfu is a martial art that focuses on the traditional disiplines developed thousands of years ago at temple of Henin, China. Developed in Malaysia, there are five animals that Quang Kuen focuses on for its technique:

        The Dragon
        The Tiger
        The Leopard
        The Snake
        The White Crane "
        Yes, those are the Five southern Shaolin animals (in the wrong order according to the Wu Xing).

        No, the Shaolin Temple was erected in 495 AD, and the Five Animal Fist didn't emerge from there until the 17th century at the earliest.

        First video is of a native Vietnamese man performing what is definitely a Southern-derived fist set, not particularly strict Hung Ga Kuen in the Tang Fong sense, but close.

        If you want my personal opinion, doing the fist sets like this (slow and without ferocity) is worthless. These are supposed to be done with Chiu Chi Lang or Gordon Liu level-intensity. With weights, too.

        That's kind of the point of kung fu.

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          #5
          Second link/set of videos is a "Competition" of more really slow and energy less attempts, and look even less like Hung Ga.

          Not to diminish what they are learning/doing, but it's more or less like the Cliff Notes version, if you know what I mean.

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            #6
            Third video (Tan tui applications) is totally dead but intended to illustrate a drill that can (and should) be performed alive.

            Also, there's a lot of fist set "exaggeration" being illustrated during the drill demonstration, which is counterproductive imo. There's a time for extended Ji Ng Ma bow and arrow stretches, and a loose and ready boxing stance. A cardinal rule of Hung Kuen is you do not fight using the fist sets versions, you adapt them to situations according to your body type.

            Final judgement, these folks are learning a very watered down version of Hung Kuen, probably because the school has been around for a while AND doesn't seem to be linked to any real Hung Kuen lineage I can identify.

            Most likely, the earliest instructor was associated with a major school (probably not Yee's, more like Lam Sai Wing schools), based on what is being shown. But damn, I'd love to work with these kids and show them real potential. I know exactly what my sifu would say about this group, or me if I trained like the walking dead.
            Last edited by W. Rabbit; 11/14/2019 10:25pm, .

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              #7
              Originally posted by W. Rabbit View Post
              Second link/set of videos is a "Competition" of more really slow and energy less attempts, and look even less like Hung Ga.

              Not to diminish what they are learning/doing, but it's more or less like the Cliff Notes version, if you know what I mean.
              Techniques in the second video look like Tan Tui 1st road. I didn't know Hung Kuen schools also taught Tan Tui. Jingwu's influence, maybe?

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                #8
                Originally posted by Drunken Soim View Post
                Techniques in the second video look like Tan Tui 1st road. I didn't know Hung Kuen schools also taught Tan Tui. Jingwu's influence, maybe?
                It's a lot bigger than that. All these sifus collect training, even if they promote or focus on a specific family school (e.g. Hung, Fut, Choy, Li, Mok in the southern sense). In some cases this means you get taught a fist set not usually associated with Hung Ga (or other styles). That's an important illusion to set aside, what you learn in a given "School": they are all connected, at least what survives to be extant today. In some substantive wholes, others, bits and pieces and in others just shadows. The Southern Shaolin bow in the first video is recognizable to anyone, so is the low body movement the Vietnamese dude is performing. Still it's slow and dead, imo.

                In the Wong Fei Hung tradition, it's ideal to keep collecting and refining fist sets while testing skill. That's what Fei Hung did, as a doctor he collected Shaolin training and refined it and added the medical practices associated with field injuries, pain, etc. And he competed regularly.

                The WFH "core" sets are kept alive through the different major lineages, but a lot of other stuff gets swept up (or lost) by individual teachers along the way. For example, I doubt any of these people at your school know the weapons, the jow recipes, the physical conditioning exercises. Individually maybe, but as a class, doubtful based on these 3 videos.
                Last edited by W. Rabbit; 11/15/2019 10:38pm, .

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                  #9
                  I decided to contact them based on this discussion and what W. Rabbit brought up and I got some very thorough responses. Apparently this school was originally under a Sifu Ang Kee Kong, who studied in Malaysia under Cheong Wing Kwang, a 4th generation student under Wong Fei Hung, with Ang having an additional influence of a Hung style he got from his father, originally from China.

                  The school has been affiliated with Ang Kee Kong's line up until recently, and apparently they broke away from the main organisation and have since added northern drills, such as the Tan Tui we discussed, which is why they changed the name. Why they split is not something I have brought up, but they still keep Hung sets, such as the five animals. They also teach weapons at the weekends on specific classes.

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                    #10
                    So to ask a murkier question then Rabbit, if there is so much variety in the sets of Hung Ga Kuen from school to school, what makes them all Hung in the first place if they are so different? Is it core principles or just tradition and lineage, or some combination of the two and/or other factors?

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                      So to ask a murkier question then Rabbit, if there is so much variety in the sets of Hung Ga Kuen from school to school, what makes them all Hung in the first place if they are so different? Is it core principles or just tradition and lineage, or some combination of the two and/or other factors?
                      Imo, there are 3 major extant influences.

                      1) The Fei Hung Schools. 5 animals, 5 elements, 12 bridges.

                      2) The "village" Hung Kuen

                      3) the "lower 4 tigers" Hasayfu Hung Kuen

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by kimjonghng View Post
                        I decided to contact them based on this discussion and what W. Rabbit brought up and I got some very thorough responses. Apparently this school was originally under a Sifu Ang Kee Kong, who studied in Malaysia under Cheong Wing Kwang, a 4th generation student under Wong Fei Hung, with Ang having an additional influence of a Hung style he got from his father, originally from China.

                        The school has been affiliated with Ang Kee Kong's line up until recently, and apparently they broke away from the main organisation and have since added northern drills, such as the Tan Tui we discussed, which is why they changed the name. Why they split is not something I have brought up, but they still keep Hung sets, such as the five animals. They also teach weapons at the weekends on specific classes.
                        Based on some research, Cheong Wing Kwang and Wong Kiew Kit are associated. Without really spilling the beans, take this as you will, these schools of Hung Kuen are considered relatively pedestrian.

                        The lack of alive competition in "kung fu clubs" is disheartening and a good sign they are not keeping up with Hung Ga Kuen tradition, imo.

                        A lot of the Hung Ga people on Bullshido right now are nodding their heads in silent agreement. Mmmmmh.
                        Last edited by W. Rabbit; 11/29/2019 1:09am, .

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