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    #16
    Here's a few different ones from some old notes I saved. Includes a different Doce Pares system to the one I posted earlier.

    I have some others noted somewhere but not in an easy to copy paste format.




    Angle 1- 45 degree strike to the upper region

    Angle 2- Left side 45 degree strike to upper region

    Angle 3- Right side 90 degree strike to mid region

    Angle 4- Left side 90 degree strike to mid region

    Angle 5- straight thrust to mid section

    (dari berbagai sumber)




    Modern Arnis Basic 12 Angles

    1. Forehand Diagonal to collarbone

    2. Backhand Diagonal to collarbone

    3. Forehand Horizontal to to ribs or elbow

    4. Backhand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

    5. Thrust to stomach

    6. Palm up Thrust to chest

    7. Palm down thrust to chest

    8. Downward strike to top of head

    9. Upward diagonal from right to left

    10. Upward diagonal from left to right

    11. Downward strike to top of head

    12. Upward Thrust to throat




    Doce Pares Eskrima

    1. Diagonal forehand strike to left shoulder

    2. Diagonal backhand strike to right shoulder

    3. Horizontal forehand strike to left ribs

    4. Horizontal backhand strike to right ribs

    5. Palm down thrust to stomach

    6. Palm up thrust to stomach

    7. Diagonal forehand strike to left knee

    8. Diagonal backhand strike to right knee

    9. Palm down thrust to chest

    10. Palm up thrust to chest

    11. Downward strike to top of head

    12. Backhand strike (Witik) to temple





    Pekiti-Tirsia Kali Basic 12 Angles

    1. Forehand Horizontal to ear

    2. Backhand Horizontal to ear

    3. Forehand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

    4. Backhand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

    5. Low line thrust to the groin or prostate gland

    6. Backhand Diagonal cavical to opposite foot

    7. Forehand Horizontal to knee

    8. Backhand thrust to solar plexus

    9. Forehand thrust to heart

    10. Two handed downward slash from top of head to either foot

    11. Two-handed grip thrust driving 45 degrees downward into the bridge of the nose

    12. Single hand thrust driving 45 degrees into the bridge of nose with simultaneous palm strike to groin with live hand.




    San Miguel Eskrima Momoy Canete

    1. Diagonal forehand slash to neck or collarbone

    2. Diagonal backhand slash to neck or collarbone

    3. Horizontal forehand slash to waist, hip, or elbow

    4. Horizontal backhand slash to waist, hip or elbow





    7. Upward forehand diagonal slash to knee or hip

    8. Upward backhand diagonal slash to knee or hip





    11. Vertical slash downward to crown of head

    12. High palm-down thrust to temple or eye



    Illustrisimo Numbering System

    1. Downward diagonal from right to left

    2. Horizontal from left to right

    3. Horizontal from right to left

    4. Downward diagonal from left to right

    5. Stab to midsection thumb up

    6. Upward diagonal from left to right

    7. Upward diagonal from right to left

    8. Stab to shoulder/neck thumb up

    9. Stab to shoulder/neck thumb down

    10. Vertical downward strike through top of skull

    11. Low downward diagonal from right to left

    12. Low downward diagonal from left to right



    Lameco Escrima

    1. left ear (forehand)

    2. right knee (back hand)

    3. left knee (fh)

    4. right ear (bh)

    5. thrust to stomach (forhand palm down)

    6. right elbow (bh)

    7. left elbow (fh)

    8. thrust solar plexus (bh palm up)

    9. right collar bone (bh)

    10. thrust heart (fh palm down)

    11. left collar bone (fh)

    12. crown of head (fh)





    1. Forehand Diagonal to collarbone

    2. Backhand Diagonal to collarbone

    3. Upward diagonal from right to left

    4. Upward diagonal from left to right

    5. Thrust to stomach

    6. Palm up Thrust to chest

    7. Palm down thrust to chest

    8. Downward strike to top of head

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by wikidbounce View Post
      Here's a few different ones from some old notes I saved. Includes a different Doce Pares system to the one I posted earlier.

      I have some others noted somewhere but not in an easy to copy paste format.


      Cinco Teros – Five Counts

      Angle 1- 45 degree strike to the upper region

      Angle 2- Left side 45 degree strike to upper region

      Angle 3- Right side 90 degree strike to mid region

      Angle 4- Left side 90 degree strike to mid region

      Angle 5- straight thrust to mid section

      (dari berbagai sumber)




      Modern Arnis Basic 12 Angles

      1. Forehand Diagonal to collarbone

      2. Backhand Diagonal to collarbone

      3. Forehand Horizontal to to ribs or elbow

      4. Backhand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

      5. Thrust to stomach

      6. Palm up Thrust to chest

      7. Palm down thrust to chest

      8. Downward strike to top of head

      9. Upward diagonal from right to left

      10. Upward diagonal from left to right

      11. Downward strike to top of head

      12. Upward Thrust to throat




      Doce Pares Eskrima

      1. Diagonal forehand strike to left shoulder

      2. Diagonal backhand strike to right shoulder

      3. Horizontal forehand strike to left ribs

      4. Horizontal backhand strike to right ribs

      5. Palm down thrust to stomach

      6. Palm up thrust to stomach

      7. Diagonal forehand strike to left knee

      8. Diagonal backhand strike to right knee

      9. Palm down thrust to chest

      10. Palm up thrust to chest

      11. Downward strike to top of head

      12. Backhand strike (Witik) to temple





      Pekiti-Tirsia Kali Basic 12 Angles

      1. Forehand Horizontal to ear

      2. Backhand Horizontal to ear

      3. Forehand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

      4. Backhand Horizontal to ribs or elbow

      5. Low line thrust to the groin or prostate gland

      6. Backhand Diagonal cavical to opposite foot

      7. Forehand Horizontal to knee

      8. Backhand thrust to solar plexus

      9. Forehand thrust to heart

      10. Two handed downward slash from top of head to either foot

      11. Two-handed grip thrust driving 45 degrees downward into the bridge of the nose

      12. Single hand thrust driving 45 degrees into the bridge of nose with simultaneous palm strike to groin with live hand.




      San Miguel Eskrima Momoy Canete

      1. Diagonal forehand slash to neck or collarbone

      2. Diagonal backhand slash to neck or collarbone

      3. Horizontal forehand slash to waist, hip, or elbow

      4. Horizontal backhand slash to waist, hip or elbow

      5. Thrust to lower right quadrant – palm down

      6. Thrust to lower left quadrant – palm up

      7. Upward forehand diagonal slash to knee or hip

      8. Upward backhand diagonal slash to knee or hip

      9. Thrust to upper right quadrant – palm down

      10. Thrust to upper left quadrant – palm up

      11. Vertical slash downward to crown of head

      12. High palm-down thrust to temple or eye



      Illustrisimo Numbering System

      1. Downward diagonal from right to left

      2. Horizontal from left to right

      3. Horizontal from right to left

      4. Downward diagonal from left to right

      5. Stab to midsection thumb up

      6. Upward diagonal from left to right

      7. Upward diagonal from right to left

      8. Stab to shoulder/neck thumb up

      9. Stab to shoulder/neck thumb down

      10. Vertical downward strike through top of skull

      11. Low downward diagonal from right to left

      12. Low downward diagonal from left to right



      Lameco Escrima

      1. left ear (forehand)

      2. right knee (back hand)

      3. left knee (fh)

      4. right ear (bh)

      5. thrust to stomach (forhand palm down)

      6. right elbow (bh)

      7. left elbow (fh)

      8. thrust solar plexus (bh palm up)

      9. right collar bone (bh)

      10. thrust heart (fh palm down)

      11. left collar bone (fh)

      12. crown of head (fh)



      WEDO Ocho Teros – Eight Count

      1. Forehand Diagonal to collarbone

      2. Backhand Diagonal to collarbone

      3. Upward diagonal from right to left

      4. Upward diagonal from left to right

      5. Thrust to stomach

      6. Palm up Thrust to chest

      7. Palm down thrust to chest

      8. Downward strike to top of head
      Have you trained all these styles? Or are you just handy with the google search?

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by jspeedy View Post
        Have you trained all these styles? Or are you just handy with the google search?
        Not from experience, I have a habit of starting projects which lose their way and stay unfinished.

        When I first started coming across different systems of angles I tried putting them into spreadsheets so I could compare them side by side. I think my intent was to compare similar angles against footwork theories, blocks, counters etc..

        It didn’t take me long to realise the scope of this project was beyond what one person could achieve on google when it gets quiet at work. It’s not much more than a list with a few extras now.

        I kept my notes but they are very old and some parts may need correcting.

        My own FMA training started with a Inosanto style JKD group. I really liked the system but I preferred the training and atmosphere at the Doce Pares club I ended up with.

        The past few years the closest I’ve been to FMA training is stick sparring once with my BJJ instructor (his style was Battlefield Kali) it was fun using the padded sticks but I definitely prefer rattan for the feel.

        I was set to start with a Kalaki Arkanis group (spelling?) this year but I ended up doing a Foil Fencing intro course instead. So much fun, got my ass kicked in the begginers tournament but got a Bronze medal as a souvenier. Recommend it as a real eye opener on the art of thrusts.

        I’ll probably have a whole new set of angles to Learn when I do get back to FMA with the new group.

        Comment


          #19
          I think this comes from Khrishna Godhania / Warriors escrima:

          1: falling forehand diagional to collarbone
          2: falling backhand diagional to knee
          3: horizontal forehand to hip or elbow
          4: falling backhand diagional to collarbone
          5: rising curving thrust from forehand side to belly
          6: rising cut from backhand side to hip or elbow
          7: rising cut from forehand side to hip or elbow (bolo)
          8: palm up straight thrust from backhand side to throat
          9: palm down curving thrust from forehand side to side of chest
          10: palm up curving thrust from backhand side to side of chest
          11: curving palm down gouge from forehand side to eye
          12: curving palm up gouge from backhand side to eye

          Some people have mentioned the rationale behind their ennumberada (simplicity for the clock and asterix, most to least useful for Chili's 11, etc.).

          Some other ideas for the order of the basic 12:
          *smooth transition between each strike so they can be practised in a set and teach a little about combining strikes
          *unexpected transitions to add an element of surprise (e.g. 1 is a high falling diagonal from forehand, opponent expects 2 to be a high falling diagonal from backhand, switch to low line instead)
          *being different for the sake of being different to some other group
          Last edited by realjanuary; 5/30/2012 7:46am, . Reason: formatting

          Comment


            #20
            Here's one I was shown many years ago, can't remember where it's from though:

            #1 - downward forehand diagonal
            #2 - upward backhand diagonal
            #3 - upward forehand diagonal
            #4 - downward backhand diagonal
            #5 - straight thrust
            #6 - backhand level
            #7 - forehand level
            #8 - ripping hook from rear hip to lead shoulder

            The last one is the interesting one, apparently based in the local preference for a blade with a proper false edge.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Chili Pepper View Post
              #8 - ripping hook from rear hip to lead shoulder

              The last one is the interesting one, apparently based in the local preference for a blade with a proper false edge.
              So this is a backhanded motion?

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                So this is a backhanded motion?
                Exactly - spine/false edge of the blade leading, pulling back from hip to shoulder.

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by jspeedy View Post
                  Have you trained all these styles? Or are you just handy with the google search?
                  I probably got these details from this page

                  http://arniseskrimamalang.wordpress....fferent-style/

                  But I think it would have been from an older thread from FMATALK or somewhere similar.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    And then there's Tapado, which uses a 40" guava stick:

                    #1 - vertical strike, like chopping wood
                    #2 - horizontal strike, right to left

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Originally posted by Chili Pepper View Post
                      And then there's Tapado, which uses a 40" guava stick:

                      #1 - vertical strike, like chopping wood
                      #2 - horizontal strike, right to left
                      That's cool. Are the strikes done with one hand or two handed?
                      Combatives training log.

                      Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

                      Drum thread

                      Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

                      "Disliking someone is not evidence of wrongdoing or malfeasance or even bias." --Dung Beatles

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by Diesel_tke View Post
                        That's cool. Are the strikes done with one hand or two handed?
                        Two-handed. IIRC, there's a tapado practitioner in #6 of the original Dog Brothers tapes. He fights against Top Dog, who waits outside of his range until he's got a feel for the timing of the strikes, and then does a ballistic entry and swats him in the head.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Yeah, I noticed that Crafty likes to walk around with a long stick. And I've seen a couple Dog Brothers fights where they use longer sticks, but they look a little longer than the Tapado style sticks. So, I wasn't sure. Also I couldn't see where anyone listed the weight of those sticks, so I didn't know if you could swing them with one hand quickly or not.

                          I guess you could if you were strong enough. I train with heavy sticks to get my strength up. It's hard to tell from a picture.
                          Combatives training log.

                          Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

                          Drum thread

                          Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

                          "Disliking someone is not evidence of wrongdoing or malfeasance or even bias." --Dung Beatles

                          Comment


                            #28
                            I've been introduced to a little tapado. My teacher knows a tapado teacher in SD but I haven't met him yet. On a related note, a few weeks ago I took the grand champion award at the SD Grand Internationals stickfighting, and my weapon of choice was the tapado. It's a pretty satisfying thing to hit people with.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by Permalost View Post
                              I've been introduced to a little tapado. My teacher knows a tapado teacher in SD but I haven't met him yet. On a related note, a few weeks ago I took the grand champion award at the SD Grand Internationals stickfighting, and my weapon of choice was the tapado. It's a pretty satisfying thing to hit people with.

                              Pretty awesome! Congrats!
                              Combatives training log.

                              Gezere: paraphrase from Bas Rutten, Never escalate the level of violence in fight you are losing. :D

                              Drum thread

                              Pavel Tsatsouline: kettlebell workouts give you “cardio without the dishonour of aerobics”.

                              "Disliking someone is not evidence of wrongdoing or malfeasance or even bias." --Dung Beatles

                              Comment


                                #30
                                "there's a tapado practitioner in #6 of the original Dog Brothers tapes"
                                That would be Ron Harris. He trained Tapado with Romeo Mamar in the Philippines. Top Dog might have done more damage if Ron's helmet had not come off in the exchange.

                                In a further explanation of the Tapado strikes, the ability to "reset" the strike immediately is of great importance. Like how a fabricating machine executes a function and then resets to repeat it as many times as is necessary, with the alternate option of going #1 to #2, or #2 to #1. etc.

                                When explained to me, the Tapado strikes were designed to strike the opponent's weapon and then "drainpipe" their way down the shaft to strike the hand if hand contact was not made by the first strike.

                                I recall sparring with someone years ago with staffs and applying this principle. Worked very well. He was a Wu-Shu trained man and had difficulty executing the twirly stuff against the "I Smash You" mindset of Tapado. Also a chiropractor he said that his hands could not take much more of a beating as almost every strike either landed or was funneled down to the hands.

                                Comment

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