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Toronto, Canada - UTM Judo

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    Toronto, Canada - UTM Judo

    The Bad: The completely unathletic people there who have no desire to actually compete -- only to "do a martial art and learn some cool throws", even though they would never be able to pull them off in a fully resisting situation. Also some of the instructors have a bit of a japan fetish, but this is understandable.

    Actually one of the guys even admitted to me the reason why it's not so competition oriented is because they fear they wouldn't have as many signups.

    The could be worse: The space is a little limited. There haven't been any huge problems yet, and i'm sure it'll be good once some more mats are ordered, but it is a little cramped -- but manageable.

    The good: The instructors actually really know their shit and well. All of them have very good technique on their throws/pins/and subs, and their black belts are not just holding up their pants. A couple of the instructors are also HUGE, so not only do they have the technique on you, you know they could kick your ass either way.

    Also, the cost for the year was 85$, with one class a week it works out to about 2$ an hour for mat time. A ridiculously good deal.

    The best: The guys there who are there to train/kick ass/get and give beatings/develop as much technique as possible.

    After all, you could have the best instructors/facilities in the world, but it's the people there that make it good. People that are there to work you and help you develop and give good feedback.

    I just wish it could be a little more competition oriented, but i'm sure we'll get there in time.

    (oh, and i gave it a 10 for weapons instruction because there isn't any, which is a 10 in my book)

    #2
    Umm, where's this located?

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      #3
      university of toronto at mississauga.

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        #4
        very bad experience

        This is a very old thread but I felt I had to share this experience with anyone considering this dojo to train in. While the instruction was ok and generally the teacher and seniors had a good attitude, I had an unforgivable experience there that showed a complete lack of professionalism.

        I had the terrible experience of feeling like my neck was going to break when I rolled with the Sensei once. (My neck/head literally bent laterally at pretty much 90 degrees+). I was in such shock after getting up from it that I never did confront the Sensei about it. This experience will never leave me as I'm left wondering how someone with a black belt and an instructor could do something so irresponsible and careless unintentionally. This leaves me to conclude at the possibility that he intentionally did it. Don't ask me why but it is an experience that I won't forget. I'll also add that when I was away for a class there was another student who suffered from a compound fracture in his leg. Don't know how exactly it happened, apparently he fell wrong. In any case, it's worth mentioning - it's not a popular injury as I understand it and it happened in the same term as my close call. In conclusion, either the instructor at the UTM dojo has no clue how to practice let alone instruct judo and therefore no right to be teaching. The hard part is the instructor seemed like a nice guy. But being nice doesn't excuse you from almost breaking an orange belts neck.

        I will also add that one of the seniors was incredibly rough with the students. He threw me once with a double arm shoulder throw (don't remember the name) and it felt like he was trying to dry me out like a wet towel. He literally threw me as physically hard as he could. This senior (a blue belt at the time) was buddys with the Sensei and appeared (not to generalize) to be a current biker (as in motorcycle shady biker) or was. This is a generalization but he certainly looked rough around the edges, if you know what I mean.

        Think twice about this dojo, ask questions to the students, and ask the people at the front desk how many injuries have been recorded over the years at this dojo. Part of me feels like I should of sued this man.

        Cheers,
        Train Hard,
        -humblePunch

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by humblePunch View Post
          This is a very old thread but I felt I had to whine and whine and whine...
          HP, you have made a sum total of two posts on Bullshido, both identical rants in 4 year old threads about UTM Judo club.

          You had a bad experience and I have no reason to believe that you are deliberately misrepresenting the truth, but could you clarify a couple of things to help us get an idea of what might actually happened?

          What is your judo experience level?

          In newaza (ground fighting), do you know what it means to "tap"? Did you tap? Did the instructor continue to apply a technique after you tapped?

          in tachiwaza (stand up) do you know how to break fall?

          Did the instructor somehow get the the erroneous impression that you had more experience than you actually have?

          I'm not trying to lay any blame at your feet, but there are a number of more likely explanations that "the instructor likes hurting beginners".

          Good luck finding an organization that suits your style.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by humblePunch View Post
            I will also add that one of the seniors was incredibly rough with the students. He threw me once with a double arm shoulder throw (don't remember the name) and it felt like he was trying to dry me out like a wet towel. He literally threw me as physically hard as he could. This senior (a blue belt at the time) was buddys with the Sensei and appeared (not to generalize) to be a current biker (as in motorcycle shady biker) or was. This is a generalization but he certainly looked rough around the edges, if you know what I mean.
            I find it hard to believe that the instructor intentionally hurt you (unless you were being a dickhead which I have no reason to believe you were) but if another student broke their leg in the same dojo, I would want to check out credentials a little more. What about the mats? Were they tatami?

            As far as the guy 'looking like a biker,' I'd have to say that even bikers tend to park their egos before they get on the mat. I grew up along some bikers in karate (they shared the mats with judoka) and they were the nicest guys - tough but respectful. They can get bounced around just as easily as any other beginner on the mats.

            Comment


              #7
              Hey Steelman,
              With 17 posts and a join date from last month, you are probably still just getting used to the site. Typically, we try not to necro threads like this. HumblePunch had a bad day and pasted the identical rant into two four year old thread and then went home to cry to mommy and never came back. So let sleeping dogs lie, unless you have something earth shattering.

              Have you introduced yourself over at newbietown? I'd like to chat with another GTA judoka, but this is not the thread. And you don't have rights to PMs until after 100 posts. So I'll look for an intro thread and get to know you there.

              Comment


                #8
                I'll reply to this old thread because this experience has never left me. I didn't have a bad day. I say with humility I was one of the best Judokas there and the Sensei told me as much at a party we had. He videotaped one of our ground sparring days. I won every match eventually getting every opponents back and applying a choke. He said he paid for school with scholarships with Judo, saying I should look into it. I never did after this horrible experience. I studied at UofT downtown (which was way more professional and competitive (I'm not huge into competition anyway) - Olympians would show up to spar there) for a year after Mississauga dojo and then quit for good.

                In response to 2groggy:

                "In newaza (ground fighting), do you know what it means to "tap"? Did you tap? Did the instructor continue to apply a technique after you tapped?"
                >> Of course. I couldn't tap because he had me in a neck hold and then he literally did a roll with me while in the hold that nearly broke my neck.

                "in tachiwaza (stand up) do you know how to break fall?"
                >> Of course, I was orange belt at the time of the incident.

                "Did the instructor somehow get the the erroneous impression that you had more experience than you actually have?"
                >> No I started with him since white belt.

                In response to steelman61:

                "What about the mats? Were they tatami?"
                >> I believe the mats were professional judo mats, not sure what quality they were, but they had nothing to do with my experience. It was a neck lock while executing a roll. I've never seen or heard of that move and I'll tell you it could of been fatal.

                "As far as the guy 'looking like a biker,' I'd have to say that even bikers tend to park their egos before they get on the mat. I grew up along some bikers in karate (they shared the mats with judoka) and they were the nicest guys - tough but respectful. They can get bounced around just as easily as any other beginner on the mats."
                >> I have no prejudice against anyone's lifestyle providing they weren't criminal dishonorable men. I only mention that they looked like bikers because often but not always these people are engaged in dishonorable behaviors, crime and lifestyles. And those that did, the blue belt who appeared to be the Sensei's close friend, fought terribly and unnecessarily rough and with a massive ego. I'll add I've sparred Olympians downtown that were black belts. So I know what unnecessarily rough is.

                What I didn't mention in the OP is that I think what had to do with it was ego. The head instructor at the time was clearly quite overweight. When I was ground fighting with him on one occasion (which I was quite good at) I got his back. He was unable to get me off after some time. Eventually all the students including the co instructor black belt stopped fighting and were watching us. I could feel it was embarrassing for him and attribute his helplessness to his weight not his skill. I eventually gave him my arm where I knew he could break free - which he did. I have a feeling this experience hurt his ego and the incident I experienced was an irresponsible abhorrent act of retaliation, it happened a class or so after. It's why I eventually quit Judo. I had studied Karate years before, I went back to Karate for some time and eventually quit that too because of my personal view there is too much ego, illusion, and further I didn't like the violence eventually. I think time is better spent learning to dance. But I still have respect for those who like budo and the artform itself.

                I will also add that many of the techniques I learned at Mississauga I found out were illegal or completely unorthodox when I went to study at UofT downtown that had much more professional and respected instructors. I also found that while I had a green or blue belt when going downtown it didn't match at all the level of instruction of the same color belts downtown, they knew much more technique and were way more proficient. The curriculum downtown was way more intense, it made Mississauga look like a very casual if not BS dojo with that instructor.

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