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Tang Soo Do (take 2)

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    #16
    OK, Thanks everyone!

    I was a victim of bullshido myself(hey I'm 22! I'm still young but I'm learning) but ever since I found this website, I'm grown more wary about the useless MA practices out there. I've found this website to be pretty useful for me in my quest for bullshido-free training.


    As for my school, I'll hang on to it for now till I move out since I made a lot of progress there. I live in Puerto Rico BTW, I get plenty of crappy TKD, Karate and Judo schools with the occasional wushu mcdojos. The closest MMA school teaches BJJ, Muay Thai and Fillipino arts which is cool but it's about an hour or 2 long drive from my town.

    Plus I'm poor college boy and with a busy schedule so I can't fancy for much. And while the school has plenty of mcdojo stuff it does occasionally do grappling and hard-sparring and tried to make the most of my training by hitting sandbags and pumping iron(which is all I do now for this semester in my home). I haven't gone there in months but I'll get back there as soon as class is over.


    Oh, and I'm sorry for hijacking your thread. I was going to start a new one but I thought since TSD was discussed here I thought, why not? Typical noob behavior, I guess. :5paperbag

    You may now continue with your regularly scheduled thread.

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      #17
      Well it all depends on if you have fun with what you are doing. Even tho my school says its TSD we also do Muay Thai Kickboxing and other things based on who is instructing the class.

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        #18
        Does anyone actually know the correct lineage of TSD?

        Okay, so we have Hwang Kee...

        And somewhere down the line, you get JC Shin, and CS Kim pops out of somewhere.
        DIDN'T YOU KNOW?! The Chinese know everything! And they knew it 4,000 years before YOU did!

        "Yes. Yes I am. I'm clearly illiterate and dictating this post to a squadron of several dozen trained jumping beans I've coearced into living on my keyboard, each named after a letter or character, which bounce up and down as I call their names." -JohnnyCache

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          #19
          Kang Uk Lee published a book titled "Tang Soo Do" (original huh). But in it he has a Moo Duk Kwan family tree (not too extensive, but it has the big names on there and all the pioneers of TSD) which I thought was pretty good. Other than that I don't know of any other lineage sources save for each organization's book of Dan numbers.

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            #20
            I think I'm going to have to ask my master about all of this.
            DIDN'T YOU KNOW?! The Chinese know everything! And they knew it 4,000 years before YOU did!

            "Yes. Yes I am. I'm clearly illiterate and dictating this post to a squadron of several dozen trained jumping beans I've coearced into living on my keyboard, each named after a letter or character, which bounce up and down as I call their names." -JohnnyCache

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              #21
              :XXbazooka :qleft2: :qleft7: :car20:

              Ask him if he has any good books that have trees in them plz.

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                #22
                He'll tell me to buy one of the WTSDA books, which cost approx. $40 something. :5arg:
                DIDN'T YOU KNOW?! The Chinese know everything! And they knew it 4,000 years before YOU did!

                "Yes. Yes I am. I'm clearly illiterate and dictating this post to a squadron of several dozen trained jumping beans I've coearced into living on my keyboard, each named after a letter or character, which bounce up and down as I call their names." -JohnnyCache

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                  #23
                  So Tang Soo Do is not related to the tang dynasty?

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                    #24
                    Only in name. Like most other Korean MAs, it's less than 100 years old. Most start out right after the Japanese occupation. Check out the other TSD historical thread for more details.
                    DIDN'T YOU KNOW?! The Chinese know everything! And they knew it 4,000 years before YOU did!

                    "Yes. Yes I am. I'm clearly illiterate and dictating this post to a squadron of several dozen trained jumping beans I've coearced into living on my keyboard, each named after a letter or character, which bounce up and down as I call their names." -JohnnyCache

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                      #25
                      "Tang" is a reference to China in this context.

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                        #26
                        Tang Soo Do
                        and
                        Kara Te Do

                        are the same characters in chinese:
                        Tang Shou Dao
                        The Way of the Tang (Dynasty) Fist

                        Later, to make it more national, the Okinawans
                        changed the Kara into the word that means empty.
                        52 blocks documentary: arrived

                        "Joe Lauzon looks like a quiet, Internet guy..." -- Dana White

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                          #27
                          I thought the change in kanji occured around the time Funakoshi introduced karate to mainland Japan?

                          I was always under the impression that the Okinawans were happy to call it "China Hand" but from a PR point of view that wouldn't have gone down too well with the more nationalistic Japanese.

                          I could be wrong of course.
                          Failing to become awesome since 1976

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                            #28
                            If your speaking of the YMCA in Salinas, that instructor was Jerry Hyde. He taught there in the late 70's before moving on to opening a school out in Bolsa Knowles. Several of his students went on to open their own. Im his son.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Kistrael View Post
                              Actually, there's something that this drudges up from my memories, now that you mention Shotokan.

                              When I was younger, say about 10 or 11, the YMCA which I live next to started teaching martial arts, namely, Shotokan. I decided to start taking classes. I can't remember all that much of what I was taught. I can remember the teacher's face vaguely, and I remember practicing. I also remember testing for my yellow belt and failing first. I got it on my second try. Eventually, something ended up happening where the teacher was no longer able to teach at the YMCA. My training ended in less than a year. (This is why I don't list my style as Shotokan).

                              However, not too long after, another teacher started at the YMCA; this time, Tang Soo Do. My teacher's last name was Hyde, and his son learned with us. I remember that our grandmaster wasn't Jae Chul Shin, it was C.S. Kim. I remember distinctly that I didn't have to modify my style at all when transitioning between Shotokan and Tang Soo Do. Even the forms were similar. We also wrestled, along with sparring. We didn't learn any formal lessons on grappling, we were just left to do on our own. I did pretty well with grappling.

                              From what I understand, there was some sort of politics and CS Kim separated from WTDSA and formed the Tang Soo Do Federation.

                              So, take it for what little anecdotal evidence it is, but from my short-lived experience, they were VERY similar, if not the same.
                              If your speaking of the YMCA in Salinas, that instructor was my father, Jerry Hyde. He taught there in the late 70's.

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                                #30
                                This gels with what I remember from my days in TSD. I honestly don't recall all the details, but the handbook we were given said that while martial arts as a whole dates back thousands of years, TSD started in 1945. My school was a bit of an odd duck, in that our instructor would not allow anyone to test for black belt until they were sixteen.

                                Also, we did a lot of stuff outside of tradition including inviting instructors from other styles to teach us TSD's weak points; grapples, throws, and ground fighting, and a focus on practical defensive techniques up to and including running for your life when necessary. While the school was closer to a mcdojo than I might want to admit, I really did learn some good practical things about fighting that helped immensely when I began working as a bouncer.

                                It goes to show that your choice of an individual school is as important as your choice of style.

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