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    Firearm Basics

    Okay so I'm hooked.

    In January I picked myself up a sig229 and I'm a regular at the range. I've liked shooting so much that I recently picked up a browning .22 for cheap plinking & practicing, and I have ordered a ruger 10/22 to start learning the basics of rifle shooting.

    That being said, where do I go from here?

    We always tell someone who wants to learn martial arts to go find a teacher, well... I can take a class here and there (shootrite is nearby, and camp skeletor is coming up woot), but the majority of my time is going to be me and perhaps a buddy, my firearm and targets.

    I've picked up some basics on shooting and paid particular attention to making good safety habits, but where's a good place I can go for info on drills and training techniques to work on improving my abilities? Especially some way of tracking my improvement would be great, so any suggestions you guys have would be much appreciated.
    HTFU and join Bullshido on Fitocracy!
    https://www.fitocracy.com/group/2988/

    #2
    I think that's how the majority of folks shoot...going out to the range with some friends and a bunch of targets. That being said, I wouldn't dismiss taking a class. Firearms training is not like MA training, its not like you'll be tied down to a 100/month contract. ;)

    Personally, I'd start with contacting an NRA certified instructor in your area and go from there. You'll probably meet someone with some good ideas.

    Comment


      #3
      most of shooting isn't advanced theory stuff. it's like boxing. there are only so many punches you can throw.

      while looking for instruction, just put a shitload of rounds through your .22 and have fun. work on mastering the basics, like breath control, squeezing the trigger (as opposed to pulling it), stance, and all the other good stuff that people don't do in the movies.

      you'll have fun and you'll have some rock solid fundamentals to shooting that will last a lifetime.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by White Kimbo View Post
        most of shooting isn't advanced theory stuff. it's like boxing. there are only so many punches you can throw.

        while looking for instruction, just put a shitload of rounds through your .22 and have fun. work on mastering the basics, like breath control, squeezing the trigger (as opposed to pulling it), stance, and all the other good stuff that people don't do in the movies.

        you'll have fun and you'll have some rock solid fundamentals to shooting that will last a lifetime.
        I'd like to find some specific drills and training exercises to do, do you guys know of any online resources or really good books I could find that covers shit like that?

        Also, any recommendations on firearm specific forums that aren't overrun with the "HUSSEIN OBAMA'S GONNA TAKE MAH GUNS" crowd? I've only been able to find one so far and it's focused primarily on long rifle shooting (Sniper Central).
        HTFU and join Bullshido on Fitocracy!
        https://www.fitocracy.com/group/2988/

        Comment


          #5
          get in touch with local NRA. hopefully your chapter isn't full of the "HUSSEIN OBAMA'S GONNA TAKE MAH GUNS" bunch, but my experience has been that the NRA is relatively professional.

          they will be able to hook you up with everything you need as a beginner.

          or you can call moose, his nuts just dropped not to long ago.

          Comment


            #6
            Take one or two courses and practice what you learn. It's not the same thing you do when training a martial art. I myself have never taken an NRA course in my life. I grew up shooting with family and I probably know more shooting technique than quite a few NRA instructors, if not most of them. There's really nothing you can learn in a class that you can't learn by asking questions and shooting with people you know and trust at the range.

            Comment


              #7
              my local gun range is full of uber right wing tactifags who never made anything of significance with their lives. all they do is sit around and talk about how much awesomer one gun they've never used in combat is over another gun they never will use in combat.

              that and homie from the hood with his latest 'gat looking like a fool with his pants on the ground talking about who he would pop if they messed with his shit.

              gun ranges can be hella hit or miss. we should probably have a gun range douche thread in here.

              Comment


                #8
                For me, the local range is a grouping of spots out in the mountains and desert North of Phoenix. The only legitimate range around here sucks arse, so we make our own ranges outdoors. Much more freedom and there tend to be plenty of people around in the better spots that really know how to shoot. I've even seen people set up tables and coolers by their vehicles so they could play poker out there when they were done shooting. Does your local range have poker tables and cool beverages? I didn't think so!

                Comment


                  #9
                  my range has a stash of vintage hustlers. it's like masturbating in a time machine.

                  ok, not really, i'm just jealous of your range. it's better than mine.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I think outdoor ranges in general have a better vibe than indoor ranges. Even if they aren't the cool make-yer-own kind. (That's kinda frowned upon in the Boston area...something to do with population density...)

                    Up hear at least, going out during crappy weather is a hella good time. Its generally LARPer/tactifag/homie free. If there are other people out there, chances are they are good people to shoot with.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I'd start off with a basic-level NRA class. Like Handgun I or something. If you're too poor---think about things like basic firearms safety, drawing SAFELY from a holster, sight acquisition, three basic tenets of marksmanship (sight alignment, trigger control, and controlling your breathing), holster drills (empty gun), magazine changes (combat reloads and tactical reloads with retention), dry firing, and start from there. Most of your foundation of shooting can be done WITHOUT using ammunition. Dry firing, trigger control, sight alignment, producing the weapon from the holster, and your various reloads. When you actually start using ammo---start up close; 3-5 yards away and gradually start moving backwards.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Money View Post
                        That being said, where do I go from here?
                        Understanding four basic marksmanship principles will help you develop your physical skills.

                        1 - The position and hold must be firm enough to support the weapon

                        2 - The weapon must point naturally at the target without undue physical strain

                        3 - Sight alignment and picture must be correct

                        4 - Each shot released must be fired and followed through without disturbing the position


                        I think No.1 is fairly self explanatory although you should endeavour not to over grip as this has an adverse effect on both accuracy and strain

                        2.. regardless of whether you're using a handgun or rifle, the weapon must point naturally in the direction of the target, if you're having to use undue effort to bring both the front and rear sights together, you'll tire quickly and your accuracy will be inconsistant

                        3.. Often people neglect that its not only the (front/rear) which has to be aligned correctly but the "sight picture" that's the whole thing :

                        Rear sight aligned with the front sight blade, picking up the correct point of aim (POA) on the target and then being able to maintain that "picture" on subsequent shots, with practice, this becomes an instinctive image and requires less effort.

                        4.. Follow through, especially in the early stages of learning how to shoot correctly is very important. Each time you squeeze the trigger you create tension - this my be physical tension in the hand controlling the pistol grip or, through anticipation of the shot and the recoil involved, both have to be accommodated and absorbed through the body. This is done through repetitive practice, gaining confidence in knowledge.

                        Additionally, each time you release a round you have recoil and movement in your body, including the hand holding the pistol grip and the finger operating the trigger, When you decide to fire, you take up any slack in the trigger, as you continue to squeeze eventually the shot is released, as it goes maintain pressure on the trigger, do not release it instantly you believe the shot has been fired as this action will its self add to the recoil effect and the potentially the inaccuracy of the shot.

                        As the round falls on the target your head/eye alignment on the target should not have altered (much) you need to bring the sight alignment and picture back into play as quickly as possible without rushing, work smoothly. As you regain the correct sight picture, release the pressure on the trigger and if you're firing a group of shots, begin your shot cycle again.. breathing, trigger slack etc etc.

                        Hope that's helpful

                        Dave

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Also, just read the post above mine.. I can't emphasise enough about safety and good weapon drills.

                          NSP's - Normal Safety Precautions

                          Obviously subject to the orders or procedures at your local range, you should be practising as often as possible how to remedy malfunctions, magazine changing and most importantly ensuring you know the safety condition of your weapon(s) at all times.

                          I speak from experience - never assume your weapon is safe, never leave your weapon(s) unattended and make keeping your index finger off the trigger a second nature part of your life.

                          Dave

                          Comment


                            #14
                            I haven't been in this particular Dungeon before and after looking around this seems like the perfect thread to Necro for my question...

                            Background: I am an Englishman whose hand gun experience has been acquired from a couple of trips to the range with experienced shooter friends...so...

                            Yesterday evening i took and passed my 'Intermediate Hand Gun" course at my local range (Range USA, Memphis TN). This place is awesome and the instructor was great. There were only 5 of us in the class, and with 200 rounds of shooting after 2hrs of class there was plenty of 1-on-1 to help with grip, stance, trigger resent etc.

                            The final 50 rounds were spent taking the TN firearms permit class as practice. Pass mark is 70%, I got 98% - with only two rounds ending up low on target at maximum distance.

                            So...I am in no rush to go for my permit classes because I can't own a firearm till i get my Greencard. Bearing this in mind, what's a good next step? I enjoy shooting, and I don't ind renting a pistol. I have only shot a few different guns, and my current "favourite" is a Glock model 23 .40 cal

                            I guess I'm wondering what y'alls thoughts are - go take further one-on-one instruction. Or just go to the range and turn money into smoke for practice. Is it worth sticking a model and caliber I enjoy shooting while I keep working on my grip, breath control, stance etc., or is now the right time to experiment with different calibers and makes of gun?

                            How often should I go (assuming enough money to take advantage off,but not enough to crazy on!). once every couple of weeks, or weekly while it's still fresh? Hell, Thursday night is date night, $40 for a lane, gun rental and dinner for two I think...

                            Finally, I want to support my local range - shop local is a motto of mine, but 200 rounds of refurb .40 cal was $78, and I can't drop that every week or two. So, weekly and 100 rounds and suck up the cost? Are other calibers cheaper, so for example, I could rent a 9mm or .38 revolver and practice cheaper? Shit, is just one box of ammo enough? Could I go to Wal*Mart and buy it cheaper and do I need a hand gun permit to buy ammo in TN (that I know I should google-Fu on actually)...

                            Or do experienced ShooterBullies still think now is the time for more formal instruction and I should go when i can afford supervised firing?

                            Appreciate your advice here guys,

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by tideliar View Post
                              So...I am in no rush to go for my permit classes because I can't own a firearm till i get my Greencard. Bearing this in mind, what's a good next step? I enjoy shooting, and I don't ind renting a pistol. I have only shot a few different guns, and my current "favourite" is a Glock model 23 .40 cal

                              I guess I'm wondering what y'alls thoughts are - go take further one-on-one instruction. Or just go to the range and turn money into smoke for practice. Is it worth sticking a model and caliber I enjoy shooting while I keep working on my grip, breath control, stance etc., or is now the right time to experiment with different calibers and makes of gun?
                              If you can afford 1 on 1 classes and you are actually learning something useful from it then go for it. In my personal experience just getting trigger time is the best way to improve. Sticking with a single gun is personal choice. I like to be able to try out different pistols but I definitely have my go to gun. I say when starting out try as many different ones in different calibers as you can because it will help inform your decision when you inevitably want to buy a pistol.

                              Originally posted by tideliar View Post
                              How often should I go (assuming enough money to take advantage off,but not enough to crazy on!). once every couple of weeks, or weekly while it's still fresh? Hell, Thursday night is date night, $40 for a lane, gun rental and dinner for two I think...

                              Finally, I want to support my local range - shop local is a motto of mine, but 200 rounds of refurb .40 cal was $78, and I can't drop that every week or two. So, weekly and 100 rounds and suck up the cost? Are other calibers cheaper, so for example, I could rent a 9mm or .38 revolver and practice cheaper? Shit, is just one box of ammo enough? Could I go to Wal*Mart and buy it cheaper and do I need a hand gun permit to buy ammo in TN (that I know I should google-Fu on actually)...
                              Go to the range as often as you want to without going broke. Ideally if you can comfortably afford once a week trips then go for it but you shouldn't feel as if you MUSt be at ther ange X times a week to improve. If you want to support your local range see if they offer a membership of some type. Usually you'll get a break on some range fees and possibly classes and or tragets but it always depends on the range.

                              Generally speaking the smaller the caliber the cheaper the ammo. If you are just starting out and want to shoot on the cheap go for some 22lr. Some ranges will not allow certain types of ammo but it is usually specific to the range. Go ask what type of rounds they allow. Usually if you stick with basic copper plated/jacketed ball ammo any range should let you use it regardless where you bought it. As far as buying ammo in the US to my knowledge all you need is to be 21 years old. No permit but as always check your local/state laws.

                              Shoot safe.

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