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    #16
    Originally posted by RobT
    Difference is, when you spar guys in your class you know them, you know how they grapple, you know what to expect, you're in a comfortable environment and no-one else cares if you tap them or get tapped. This will mean you will be calm and relaxed when you fight, you'll think clearly and you'll be able to grapple at your very best level.

    In a competition you have no idea what to expect, your opponent could be looking to pull guard or take you down. You are being watched by strangers and your friends/teammates are there and you know they all want you to win. It's totally different.

    When I first started competing, I couldn't fight anywhere near what I could do in training, and like you I found it frustrating. For me, it was just a case of getting more experience of competing so I could relax in competition and fight my best.

    I think, other important points for competing;

    - you have to start immediately. Don't be slow getting grips or think pulling guard will be easy like it might by in class. As soon as the fight starts, attack for whatever you want.

    - always take the fight to them. Try to be the one attacking at all times. In training it doesn't matter, you can let off for a bit and have fun with positions while looking for new stuff etc. In competition you can't ever give your opponent anything.

    - plan everything you need the day before. You should be able to be relaxed while waiting to fight, you shouldn't have to be looking for drink/food/kneepads etc.
    I agree. There is a lot of pressure in doing competition. A lot of times that pressure will lead to a mental and/or physical "freeze". You know what to do, but your inactive or slower then you usually are.

    In my opinion, having the right mental attitude for competition will make a HUGE difference in how well you perform. If you don't have the will to win, and the other person is "hungry" then chances are he is going to beat you, even if your a better grappler.

    It might be a good idea to start prepping yourself a few months before a tournament in how you roll. Don't roll like you normally do in class, instead imagine that your competing right here and now. Set a time limit, like they would in the real match up. Have someone score points, like in a match. Be as aggressive as you would in the match, and remember to think about strategy. Also keep your self confidence up and make sure to relax and not get frustrated. Remember: it's a sport, if you loose, who cares?


    Also, competition isn't for everyone, decide if it's really that important to you or if you just want to improve your game for personal reasons

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      #17
      With regards to what you said about not feeling as though you're making any progress when you roll with higher belts, I felt the same way a short while ago. As far as I was concerned, my problem was that I was thinking entirely about myself, and not considering the fact that your training partners aren't static. They're learning too, so as you get better, they're getting better as well which probably makes it feel as though you're not making any progress. It's frustrating as hell. God damned purples, stop getting better!

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        #18
        I've had a lot of competition success compared to guys in my gym that are my level or better in practice. One trick I learned long ago in sports is that I never think about barely winning or getting points or how I am going to beat a certain "kind of guy". I just convince myself that I will win because I am better and better prepared. I fight/compete on a level higher than I train. All my coaches have noticed this through all my sports careers. In Jiu jitsu this translates into going for subs and winning with any move that works. I never think about back points or position points. Just get the win.

        Never try to "hang in there" or get "enough" points. PLAY TO WIN.

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          #19
          The whole issue about "not caring" about winning or losing and being relaxed has helped my Judo game 100%. Each time I compete I learn so much afterwards, it helps me in practice, and I know that is what will help me in competition. Everytime I focused on not being ipponed, I found a way to get ipponed.

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            #20
            for me. I used to be a "relax, chill" type of guy and it seemed to be doing fine and working. One day at a grading tournament I stood looking at my second opponent and he was huffing, blowing and generally looked psyched up. BANG... he threw me in about 30 seconds.

            Ever since I've tried the KILL KILL KILL method and it seems to be better for me. I'm now very attacking and I score more ippons as a result. Just a thought. It's not working for me so well now as I'm competing at a higher level but its worth a try?

            If you compete at a relatively low level then "mega attack" may do fine. DON'T WORRY ABOUT MESSING UP.

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              #21
              I can solve your problem right here: In your post, you described a threshold, where anyone above a certain skill/belt level basically just dominated you, and you didn't see yourself improving. Fight nonstop with people above that threshold.

              I had the exact same problem. Fought for a month nonstop against the toughest competitor in the club, and he kicked my ass every single time without fail. Never once came close to beating him. Too soon it was tourny time again, and it took a lot of coaxing to get me to go.
              When I finally got out on th mat, my opponent was nowhere near the skill of the guy I had been sparring with. His techniques were so much less effective that I actually started laughing in the middle of the competition (bad idea, I was just so surprised).

              He used my laughter as an opening to go for a collar choke, but it wasn't even a concern. Instead of freaking out and defending as I would have a few months back, I just responded with my own collar choke. He immediately released, but was out before he could even tap.

              I think the moral is: Though it isn't always obvious, sparring with opponents who are way above your level improves one's game tremendously.

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                #22
                Originally posted by JabCrossHook
                for me. I used to be a "relax, chill" type of guy and it seemed to be doing fine and working. One day at a grading tournament I stood looking at my second opponent and he was huffing, blowing and generally looked psyched up. BANG... he threw me in about 30 seconds.

                Ever since I've tried the KILL KILL KILL method and it seems to be better for me. I'm now very attacking and I score more ippons as a result. Just a thought. It's not working for me so well now as I'm competing at a higher level but its worth a try?

                If you compete at a relatively low level then "mega attack" may do fine. DON'T WORRY ABOUT MESSING UP.

                Annoyingly true in judo, Ive got a bunch of silver medals thanks to this one guy who traine dunder the same instructer as me (but not same class). He used to go mental and I always thought he was gonna rake my eyes out. One tourny he didnt compete and bang I got gold. Still cant psych myself up though, I just feel damn cheesy. More of a countering guy. The one time I did beat him, I had him pinned and had to keep telling him to calm down and thats its going to be ok. Like he was dieing or something.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by benonmsn
                  I am thinking it would take a lot of years to be comfortable losing.. :-(






                  You should NOT get comfortable losing. You should fucking hate it.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    In my opinion competition requires building a competition gameplan. Lloyd Irvin's guys, whatever you say about their marketing, do this very well. What do you put in your competition gameplan? Pick you best tandem of takedowns or judo throws - 3 or 4 for standup. Pick your best 4 chaining techniques from positions. Drill these to the exclusion of other things you're working on at least a month before the competition. Drill them to where you go for your attack chains automatically. Drill them until you can hit them on people expecting it.

                    When you compete, execute on the gameplan you drilled. If you do this you won't be passive or lackadaisacal or in a reactive mental mode. You will lose far less often. When you do, you can look at videos and re-evaluate your gameplan, adjust as necessary.

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                      #25
                      How bad do you want to win when you do compete?

                      Do you wake up at night sweating having nightmares about losing? So insane that you will get out of bed to run at 2am until exhaustion so that you can finally sleep? Every meal do worry about weight? Every training session do you fear getting injured and missing training that your opponents will be engaging in?

                      Maybe I take my competitions way too seriously. Some people go "just to have fun". Or compete "just for the experience". That isn't my way. When I step onto the mat you are a nameless, faceless obstacle that I want to crush. The only thing that brings me to the highest level of joy is winning. I guess it's like a crack high. And I will do anything to get that high. And it sucks for my opponent. Especially if they are there "just to have fun".

                      So ask yourself.... how badly do you want to win?

                      Comment


                        #26
                        I think we should all be asking ourselves, at this point, why we aren't more like Yrkoon9 and what we can do to remedy this sad state of affairs.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Yrkoon9
                          How bad do you want to win when you do compete?

                          Do you wake up at night sweating having nightmares about losing? So insane that you will get out of bed to run at 2am until exhaustion so that you can finally sleep? Every meal do worry about weight? Every training session do you fear getting injured and missing training that your opponents will be engaging in?

                          Maybe I take my competitions way too seriously. Some people go "just to have fun". Or compete "just for the experience". That isn't my way. When I step onto the mat you are a nameless, faceless obstacle that I want to crush. The only thing that brings me to the highest level of joy is winning. I guess it's like a crack high. And I will do anything to get that high. And it sucks for my opponent. Especially if they are there "just to have fun".

                          So ask yourself.... how badly do you want to win?
                          That's so frickin' awesome. I love rolling with people like this. Bring your A game or pack it up early. This is what BJJ is all about.

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                            #28
                            One of my coaches told me, "If you're not attacking you're defending, and it's better to be the one attacking." I think that's good advice for me personally.

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                              #29
                              if you did well in wrestling, try picturing yourself in a wrestling tournament and get back to that mental state. I'm no competition expert, but if you knew how to win before, you still know now its just buried somewhere in your head.

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                                #30
                                Well, for me, I wrestled in HS, and I was the pits. Awful. I loved training, but I would just get steamrolled. I was also really, really anxious before bouts.

                                For BJJ, I don't get super anxious, I focus really well, and honestly, I feel I compete way better than when I'm in the gym. After a tournament, I feel my game improves a ton, just from the focus on training, and the confidence in winning.

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