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Okay experts explain to me why we don't see this at high level competition

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  • blackmonk
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post

    I am not what and how much you follow but I feel this is an interesting match up for what your talking about, it was an odd ruleset for sure.
    Interesting tactics by Gordon given that they agreed to the no leg locks rule but the Kani Basami entries where a good way for him to bring to the floor and to get into a control position, didn't quite work out the way he was looking for but given the rule set not a bad tactic?


    I mean, I don't think it was a good or bad tactic, in and of itself. I think it was just the absolutely only way he had a chance at all against a 6-time NCAA title holder, and it just so happened to work out ok.

    Point is, if he approached a match with Bo Nickal like that on 10 occasions, I think it would work out for him less than 50% of the time. He'd be better off over time just learning how to wrestle for real.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raycetpfl
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post

    You mean like this?


    Holy crap Roger's grip has to be freaking insane.
    Drysdale's grip is stronger Then his kimono as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by Raycetpfl View Post
    What people don't understand is how strong Bjj world champs are. You can't just remove grips at will.
    You mean like this?


    Holy crap Roger's grip has to be freaking insane.

    Leave a comment:


  • Raycetpfl
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    Just to prove I care about the Gi and don't watch just Gordon Ryan matches:


    . What I can't really tell is if that was bad form on his part or Mergali effectively creating that flare in his elbow.
    What people don't understand is how strong Bjj world champs are. You can't just remove grips at will.
    Mergali used collar and DLR and his other leg to create an off balance that caused Aly to break posture. Mergali shoots a triangle @ 00:55 and Aly is forced to extend his arm and end up in an omoplata attempt. He's able to get out of it. But from here on out Merigali now has a collar and sleeve grip they can't just be removed regardless of what the dip shitz in the booth think. Muhammad Is trying to pin margali down with his left arm because he can't get it back Due to margalis collar and sleeve grip. From there he just goes down the rabbit hole of margali capitalizing on nice sub attempts and transitions

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Just to prove I care about the Gi and don't watch just Gordon Ryan matches:



    Also I found this match interesting cause Mahamed Aly is so very good, but that was a pretty one sided match.
    The tempo was given to Nicholas Mergali for almost the whole match and it all seems to come off of the fact that Mahamed Aly did leave that exposure to the Omoplata.
    If I am understanding correctly that exposure was from having that flared elbow. What I can't really tell is if that was bad form on his part or Mergali effectively creating that flare in his elbow.

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    Again, it comes down to how skilled people are within their models.
    I am not what and how much you follow but I feel this is an interesting match up for what your talking about, it was an odd ruleset for sure.
    Interesting tactics by Gordon given that they agreed to the no leg locks rule but the Kani Basami entries where a good way for him to bring to the floor and to get into a control position, didn't quite work out the way he was looking for but given the rule set not a bad tactic?


    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Mifune is an example of Kodokan mythology in action. I've seen a photo of him when he was in his prime. He was one buff little MF. Too bad no film of him in action as a much younger man.

    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    Oh so speaking of the Monkey paw thing, I can now see how Gordon Ryan is applying it in this match:

    Damn he is good. Reminds me of my former BJJ teacher. Close to same build, too.

    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    Everyone watches Mifune Sensei, and he did give an amazing display of Judo.

    But, watch his ukes just as closely.
    Yeah, back on an old judo Forum there was a guy who actually was mifune uke.

    He basically said the same thing.

    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    When I do newaza, gi or no gi, I barely grip at all.

    And even when I do standing Judo, my grips are very light.
    Good example of adjusting to particular physical condition.

    Although not gripping a lot is a is a high-level skill.

    And I when to hold on to a grip and when to let go is really important to.

    These sorts of things take years to learn.

    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    Of course not.

    I tell all my university and grapple-fu students, "don't believe anything I say, unless you can prove it for yourself".

    And, I much prefer people I teach in those environments to disagree with me, and think for themselves, than the contrary.

    Very true, sadly.

    People are always fascinated with flash moves, hot moves, etc., etc.

    A good example in Judo is the phenomenon that people tend to see and watch for the finish.

    Even the names of the throws are usually the names of the finish.

    Meanwhile, all the magic was the posture, grips, footwork, off balance, and entry that resulted in the finish becoming available...
    Yeah, watching a good match with knowledgeable judoka you get a lot of reactions the stuff outside of a big throw.

    It's easier to see stuff from afar since when you're involved in to match personally.

    Leave a comment:


  • Dr. Gonzo
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    Wait what?
    Kimura's wife got TB.

    To raise money for Western medical treatments, Kimura took up professional fighting, and also pro-wrestling.

    Mifune thought this was unbecoming and had Kimura kicked out of the Kodokan.

    Kimura was still very popular, and there was some backlash.

    For instance, none of Mifune's katas got included in the official Kodokan curriculum of katas.

    Kimura was eventually reinstated as a coach and professor.

    Mifune, in his final film, is shown delicately trimming hedges with precise shears.

    When Kimura was filmed, he made a point to be filmed trimming his hedges with a chainsaw.

    The Japanese are both subtle and unsubtle at the same time, aren't they....

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr. Gonzo View Post
    And of course the legendary animosity between Mifune and Kimura is an interesting tale.
    Wait what?

    Leave a comment:


  • BKR
    replied
    Originally posted by goodlun View Post
    Thank you for humoring me with a response, I greatly appreciate it.
    I hope you don't mind me comparing what you have said to others

    If I am following you right
    I have certainly have heard of this concept, Ryan Hall, Danaher, and Lister have all basically expressed this idea.
    Especially with regards to leg locks, basically force people into a game where your skilled and they are not.
    In fact I would say that is what BJJ is about right, take the fight to the ground and be the shark



    Indeed the fundamentals seem to be a very key place to focus for sure.
    One only really need to look at Kron Gracies back to basics approach run.

    So getting back to videos I am going to assume unless you have a big name, putting out a fundamentals video isn't going to get a lot of clicks.
    But if you put out a "They won't see this coming choke" one is likely to.
    A concept from team sports is how teams match up in various positions.

    So a big part of team sports, is maximizing your match up vs the other team.

    For example, in football, at HS level, coaches will test say, a cornerback vs a particular WR, both pass and run.

    If one corner is stronger than the other, they will not go against him nearly as much.

    Works same in individual sports.

    If your say at Olympic level in Judo you have different game plans for all the different players those game plans Also may vary depending on where in the draw you are matched up with them.

    So you have to have a coach to understand the strengths and weaknesses of all your potential opponents.

    Depending on how and how you match up you might have really only one chance to beat particular opponent in a match and you will have trained for that particular moment for that particular person. Of course spontaneous stuff happens but at the highest levels not so much.

    Individual player will literally hire other judoka to pretend to be their potential opponents same size weight reach Etc, and they will drill and RanDori against those hired uke.

    Leave a comment:


  • goodlun
    replied
    Oh so speaking of the Monkey paw thing, I can now see how Gordon Ryan is applying it in this match:

    Leave a comment:

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