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Old School Ankle lock break down.

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    Old School Ankle lock break down.

    Going to try to get one video going per week:


    #2
    Subscribed

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

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      #3
      Getting butt to butt, scooping in is a great thing to call out, and one of the most basic things to screw up. Nice.

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        #4
        I've been guilty of the falling back manoeuvre many times. It was mostly due to a noob panic reaction of "I can't believe I've got control, now what?".

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          #5
          Originally posted by Cake of Doom View Post
          I've been guilty of the falling back manoeuvre many times. It was mostly due to a noob panic reaction of "I can't believe I've got control, now what?".
          Yeah, that's one of my students right now. He's obsessed on getting the ankle lock. He lost his last competition because of that.

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            #6
            What do you think of the Craig Jones or DDS variant with the elbow hop and outwards rotation?

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              #7
              Well a little late to this party but that step in is such an important detail that is so easy to miss in the moment.
              Thanks!!!

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                #8
                Originally posted by Myn View Post
                What do you think of the Craig Jones or DDS variant with the elbow hop and outwards rotation?
                You are rarely(okay never) going to go wrong with any variation of a leg attack from the following individuals:
                DDS members
                Dean Lister
                Ryan Hall
                Lachlan Giles

                Still for attacking the straight ankle lock from the Guard position its really hard to beat:




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                  #9
                  Originally posted by goodlun View Post

                  You are rarely(okay never) going to go wrong with any variation of a leg attack from the following individuals:
                  DDS members
                  Dean Lister
                  Ryan Hall
                  Lachlan Giles

                  Still for attacking the straight ankle lock from the Guard position its really hard to beat:



                  That's some good material. I love me some classic Dean Lister. I'm personally more partial to the way that the DDS, Craig, and Mikey do it. Some good examples from Youtube:

                  https://youtu.be/u9BE8kY123A?t=63

                  and an important detail for when you are turned to the side from an inverting straight ankle lock:

                  https://youtu.be/JD3QucUWIwI

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Myn View Post

                    That's some good material. I love me some classic Dean Lister. I'm personally more partial to the way that the DDS, Craig, and Mikey do it. Some good examples from Youtube:

                    https://youtu.be/u9BE8kY123A?t=63

                    and an important detail for when you are turned to the side from an inverting straight ankle lock:

                    https://youtu.be/JD3QucUWIwI
                    Like I said you can't go wrong with those, but really I am a simpleton and don't see much difference from what all of them are doing.
                    Really its the commonalty to look at.
                    Control distance so that the foot/ankle is right on the bone of your wrist, slightly twisted, and can't move.
                    This is largely done with the hands being at that peck level and using your very strong back muscles to keep every snug.
                    Control the knee because you always control the join above the one your breaking. The tighter the control on that joint the better.
                    Wedge the hips.
                    Give yourself space to create breaking pressure, so this is where Craig Jones being on his side is good it creates a lot of negative space to move into.
                    That is also very similar to how Dean is already attacking sitting up.

                    So really the game comes down to entries.
                    The DDS are very adapt at attacking legs from double guard(by getting inside position) or from bottom(with inside leg control).
                    The entry Dean and Omega are showing is a good pass or lock entry.

                    Finishing position is largely the same for this break as described above.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by goodlun View Post

                      Like I said you can't go wrong with those, but really I am a simpleton and don't see much difference from what all of them are doing.
                      Really its the commonalty to look at.
                      Control distance so that the foot/ankle is right on the bone of your wrist, slightly twisted, and can't move.
                      This is largely done with the hands being at that peck level and using your very strong back muscles to keep every snug.
                      Control the knee because you always control the join above the one your breaking. The tighter the control on that joint the better.
                      Wedge the hips.
                      Give yourself space to create breaking pressure, so this is where Craig Jones being on his side is good it creates a lot of negative space to move into.
                      That is also very similar to how Dean is already attacking sitting up.

                      So really the game comes down to entries.
                      The DDS are very adapt at attacking legs from double guard(by getting inside position) or from bottom(with inside leg control).
                      The entry Dean and Omega are showing is a good pass or lock entry.

                      Finishing position is largely the same for this break as described above.
                      So interesting points we need to consider:
                      1) you MUST control not just the hip but also the knee line.
                      2) you must account for the likely defensive patterns of the opponent (Mikey's example is a fine demonstration of this principle)
                      3) you have to provide a convincing breaking force that is great enough to force the opponent to tap

                      for number 3, the reason why the version Craig demonstrates is so good, is because he is not JUST creating negative space, but also changing the angle and creating a rotational component which makes the straight ankle lock's mechanism into one more akin to a toehold. We have seen many examples in recent years proving that rotational shearing forces are the most powerful. One notable example recently would be from John and the DDS, with their single arm RNC (or RNS as he puts it) finish. The rotational element along with the closed circle principle are the reasons why his team is capable of finishing with just a single arm, freeing up the other arm to handle the secondary defensive hand, leaving no hands free to block the strangle.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Myn View Post

                        That's some good material. I love me some classic Dean Lister. I'm personally more partial to the way that the DDS, Craig, and Mikey do it. Some good examples from Youtube:

                        https://youtu.be/u9BE8kY123A?t=63

                        and an important detail for when you are turned to the side from an inverting straight ankle lock:

                        https://youtu.be/JD3QucUWIwI
                        I do the variation done in the first video. As a matter of fact I think I use almost the exact dialogue when teaching the modern ankle lock. On the other hand I'm not sure if I agree with the second video. Won't know for sure until I get on the mat and experiment with it.

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