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Do you cross your ankles when preforming an armbar from mount?

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    Do you cross your ankles when preforming an armbar from mount?

    Ive heard different things from different black belts in Judo and BJJ. Some say crossing your ankles relieves pressure from the knees which makes it easier to escape and so it should be avoided, whilst others have suggested that crossing the ankle furthest from the head over the other puts pressure on the neck and helps prevent escapes.

    What do you guys do? Do you think it purley a matter of preference, or have you found one approach much more successful than the other?

    Personally, I cross my ankles.

    #2
    IF, you have BOTH arms inside your legs, its ok.

    If you only have one its a huge no-no.
    "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC

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      #3
      I do both ways. It depends on how the guy is defending, his size, his arms placement...

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        #4
        MTripp has armbarred teh correct. One arm in + crossed ankles = hitchhiker escape. That's where you stop to give a guy a ride home from practice but he murders you and leaves your body in a ditch.

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          #5
          I was told not to cross the ankles.. but unfortunately bad habits persist...
          "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
          Spoiler:

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            #6
            As Mtripp said you can cross them if you've got both arms in. I don't because:

            a) When I learnt the technique I was told not to
            b) I actually find it a bit easier to transition to the triangle (if they manage to pull the arm out) if the ankles aren't crossed.

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              #7
              Yes, this man obviously does not know how to do an armbar:

              All joking aside, I was always taught that crossing the ankles doing armbars in general was unneccesary and only gives the illusion of more control. I tend to agree - my ankle-crossed armbars definitely feel looser as I have to let up a bit of pressure to cross my ankles.

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                #8
                I think there is a video of sambosteve rolling in russia where they show when/why to cross the ankles... But in general I side with mr.Tripp, both arms in you cross one arm in you don't.
                Sometimes you lose and sometimes the other guy wins.

                At this point I don't owe anybody an explenation.

                Schools I trained at:
                Lotus Club Cetepe Liberdade Sao Paulo
                Renzo Gracie NYC
                New York Combat Sambo

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                  #9
                  I cross the ankles when armbarring from the bottom (as in picture), but uncrossed from mount.

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                    #10
                    Cool, I haven't been taught the one-or-both-arms bit, will ask about that.

                    I was shown one way when it helps. Say your uke's head is to your left side, they're belly up. If your right leg is crossed over their arm and hooked under their neck/head, then you can toss your left leg over their face for the million dollar bonus.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by Whacker View Post
                      Cool, I haven't been taught the one-or-both-arms bit, will ask about that.

                      I was shown one way when it helps. Say your uke's head is to your left side, they're belly up. If your right leg is crossed over their arm and hooked under their neck/head, then you can toss your left leg over their face for the million dollar bonus.
                      what people mean when they say this is that if you're armbarring from mount, you should have your ankles crossed underneath your opponents far shoulder.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Mtripp View Post
                        IF, you have BOTH arms inside your legs, its ok.

                        If you only have one its a huge no-no.
                        This is what I've been taught.

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                          #13
                          Shawarma, that's not an arm bar from MOUNT. :P

                          Correct crossed ankles:

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                            #14
                            Yea crossing ankles while on top with both legs in is ok. I usually do it when they are gripping to defend. I will pull the far arm and cross my ankles to keep it in place then break the grip.

                            While on bottom you should not cross your ankles because you should be holding the head down with one leg and the other curling to control the body.

                            All in all it is not necessary to cross the ankles but some of us do from certain positions and situations.
                            Judo is only gentle for the guy on top.

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                              #15
                              If you have both arms and elbows in then let the ankle crossing commence, but if you only have one arm you want to leave your ankles uncrossed.

                              From what I've been told, leaving your ankles uncrossed allows you to apply more pressure between your knees, and crossing your ankles with both arms in prevents an escape at the cost of some knee pressure.

                              Honestly though, I'd probably tap either way. :icon_wink

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