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Training against guys that are bigger than you??

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  • Grappler
    replied
    I beat bigger opponents in my BJJ class all the time. Technique all the way! Still, there are two guys who give me a run for my money. One is about 215, but he had about a year of boxing training and is very fast. Hard to control. His athleticism is really something. The other is 280 lbs and can bench press me with one hand....

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  • musicalmike235
    replied
    Originally posted by 123ash
    hi

    i am currently doing bjj at the moment, and i have found that it is an awesome martial art. but the problem im having is that guys that are bigger and stonger than me always kick my ass with ease. i have onlu been doing it for about 2months, but they use their size and stregnth and can easily pass any defensive positon i may have on my back.

    im 15, and about 10stones. but do you think that it comes with time, and that if you train with people that are bigger and stronger than you, you will become alot better.


    thanks guys
    I am in the same boat you are in with my Judo class. Most of the people there have significant weight advantages over me. When we are sparring, and I am trying to execute a throw or takedown, being smaller makes it extremely difficult (but not impossible) to pull anything off.

    However curiously enough, when it goes to the ground, I generally find being smaller than my opponent to be advantageous (which at first would probably seem counter-intuitive). On the ground, its a lot easier for me to maneuver my small body mass than it is for them to move their big body mass, and I can usually capitalize on this.

    Even if you aren't having any luck against your bigger opponents, you are probably getting a lot better than you would be if you were rolling with people your size and beating them easily. Consequently, come tournament time, when you are up against someone in your weight class, you having to roll with people who are bigger than you durring practice will suddenly be to your advantage.

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  • twKoxinga
    replied
    so in your opinions, slightly off topic, at what point does the person count as big enough to make a difference? by how many pounds or kilos do they outweigh you?
    just wondering.

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  • catherine1973
    replied
    Originally posted by Beorn
    as one of those bigger guys that everyone has to roll with, let me just say that we know it sucks for you guys, and we feel bad. if ur new we even try to be lighter on top because there is no point in beating up on the new guy and not letting him learn anything.
    I've just recently started studying jiu-jitsu and, as a 5'4" female, I take it as a given that I will almost always be the smaller person. Personally, I like the challenge. It makes me work harder. So, to the young man who feels frustrated, just keep at it.

    Catherine

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  • Syphilis
    replied
    Bigger guys really hate knee on chest/knee on face.

    Stay on top, work your sweeps. Don't let them use their weight. I run circles around 200 lbs juicers if I'm on top -but they do tend to benchpress me off. That's their problem though, because you can't feel bad about that. They're not learning technique, which in the end, will triumph over strength. They will rely on their strength but once your technique gets good enough, you will be much too quick for them, much too skilled and they are wondering why they are still a two stripe whitebelt, while you are surpassing them much more quickly.

    I personally make it my goal to train with at least 1 big/strong guy a session. Like, a 200+ pounder who just tries to muscle.

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  • 3moose1
    replied
    Originally posted by Bustardo
    It also seems to be the case that as I pass someones guard they kind of LET me get to side control, and then try to escape, insted of fighting like hell to prevent me from establishing it. I know I used to do the same thing, I think it's a very noobish habit though.
    I used to do this, too, then one of my coaches told me, during a tournament, "if you grab the single leg as they pass, they don't get points."

    Then i realized that just because they pass doesn't mean they automatically get side control

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  • franz_grinder
    replied
    Every forum needs an FAQ on bigger opponents at this point - It's all the same stuff usually, butterfly guard, try to always be on top, Collar chokes in Gi...

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  • Tangerine
    replied
    I can recall a sparring partner who probably weighed just over 350 lbs. I had to a drill with him starting out each time with him in my closed guard. I couldn't do anything from there. I asked the teach if I could start with open guard, but I was out of luck that time.

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  • Bustardo
    replied
    Originally posted by jasculs

    First thing: I do everything I can do NOT be on the bottom. I always want to be on top against a much bigger person.

    Second thing: If I have to be on the bottom I do everything I can to create space and control the distance. By doing this I know that I am much harder to control and that my opponent can't get his weight on me like he wants. I use butterfly guard, open guard (feet on hips is important here), and so on.
    This is pretty much what my instructor does during our privates. If he's playing from the bottom (I have 90 pounds on him) he just makes it so incredibly hard for me to pass that I usually end up getting swept and mounted. It's made my passing game against the other students much better, but man... someone with a good guard is such a bitch, even when I have a massive weight advantge.

    Someone in our class said it felt like a safe fell on them when I got side control. He said, "I know, thats why you can't let the safe fall on you." Seems simple but it really makes sense.

    It also seems to be the case that as I pass someones guard they kind of LET me get to side control, and then try to escape, insted of fighting like hell to prevent me from establishing it. I know I used to do the same thing, I think it's a very noobish habit though.
    Last edited by Bustardo; 7/18/2008 10:09am, .

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  • DKJr
    replied
    Originally posted by rino86
    One thing you can do to keep your chin up
    I would say keep your chin down. (rimshot)

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  • jasculs
    replied
    As mentioned earlier in this thread you lack of experience will always make things harder, especially against someone who is much bigger then you.

    You have to do things and get yourself in positions that won't allow your opponent or partner to get his weight on top of you. When he does this, that's when it really becomes a fight.

    Work more in getting around your opponent such as trying to get the back. Also I personally don't play much closed guard against guys much bigger then me because they are very close to me and it becomes easier for them to get their weight on me.

    First thing: I do everything I can do NOT be on the bottom. I always want to be on top against a much bigger person.

    Second thing: If I have to be on the bottom I do everything I can to create space and control the distance. By doing this I know that I am much harder to control and that my opponent can't get his weight on me like he wants. I use butterfly guard, open guard (feet on hips is important here), and so on.

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  • rino86
    replied
    One thing you can do to keep your chin up is focus not on how a larger/stronger guy beat you, but how hard he had to work to do it.

    If I have a guy that is 50lb larger but can only submit me maybe once and has to sit out the next round from fatigue, I consider it a good roll.

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  • weakling
    replied
    just keep training.

    size and strength are always going to be challenging especially if they've got skills too.

    working with guys bigger and stronger than you is definitely going to make sure you use correct technique (because there's no other choice).

    also, the goal isn't to be able to beat bigger/stronger training partners. it's to get as good as you can get. if it's a sport/competition goal then there are weight classes. if it's a self-defense goal.. then the likelihood of getting into an altercation with a bigger/stronger, bjj skilled training partner who knows your game is also incredibly slim.

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  • Skillful
    replied
    There's that one, there's the one where your training partner tries to creat distance in your closed guard (a/k/a push against your crossed ankles with his back) by sticking his knee in your butt and you take him sideways

    and the one you do when he sticks both elbows inside your knees, (no hands to base out with)

    That's off the top of my head though.

    To the original poster, study hard for a year or two and you'll love rolling with the less experienced, but much bigger guys, because they will be the frustrated ones. Plus, if you're a little guy, it makes a lot of sense to learn how to handle yourself against a bigger opponent, so I spend the majority of my time practicing with guys who outweigh me by between 30 and 100 pounds.

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  • Macungah
    replied
    I'm a heavy guy 5'10", around 205 lbs. The smaller guys I grapple against tend to... I'm not sure how to describe it. I guess they sort of use my strength to climb around me. Or, they're so much smaller that they can squirm out of all sort of pinning maneuvers.

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