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    Basics Escape from Mount


    #2
    It really depends on a few things.

    1) Where are they riding in the mount?
    2) How flexable are you?
    3) How much space did they give you?

    If a guy rides really high, like he's going to work armbars, I can throw my feet up and push him while I scramble out the backdoor. If a guy rides really low, I can shrimp and try to regain my guard. If he gives me too much space, I can usually push his hips and trap a post and roll him.

    It's really important to stay relaxed, keep your elbows in and arms close to your body or his hips, stay moving, and wait for him to make the mistake. Now in MMA this is probably bad advice, but in Sport bjj it works great. He can't hang out in the mount without taking some kind of action, and he's not allowed to punch you in the face. I dont want to post techniques because I'm only a white belt. But with those key points in mind I usually do quite well in escaping the mount.

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      #3
      the upa + elbow escape combo is your best friend. lather, rinse, repeat as necessary.

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        #4
        I use that one a lot. Sometimes I like to do that and fake like I'm giving my back, then when the guy starts to sink one hook, I roll back towards him to capture half guard and either shrimp back to full guard or work a sweep.

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          #5
          #1. Don't let him settle so he can drop bombs on your face.

          #2. Don't turn your back.

          #3. Escape.

          How you execute #3 will depend on a variety of factors that might vary moment to moment so there are no clear answers except experimentation through experience.

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            #6
            1. Get foot into their belt
            2. ...
            3. Profit!

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              #7
              Use the upa to setup the elbow escape. Use the elbow escape to setup the upa.

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                #8
                Originally posted by FictionPimp
                If a guy rides really high, like he's going to work armbars, I can throw my feet up and push him while I scramble out the backdoor.
                I did that one for the first time the other day. Fucked up while rolling gi and got mounted by a guy who fights MMA and he immediately mounted me high and loose. At this point upa and elbow was useless and it was intimidating as hell...then I remembered seeing a mount escape on one of Bas' DVD's like you described above (Q jesus music and a glowing image of El Guapo). For once my long gangly legs helped and I popped right out the back. I was pretty pleased with myself...except for the getting mounted and opening up the beat down window as wide as it would go.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by Aesopian
                  Use the upa to setup the elbow escape. Use the elbow escape to setup the upa.
                  Upa is feet flat and knees bent, push up the hips, right? Does it matter whether the mount is low or high?

                  I don't know the elbow escape sequence at all. Can you briefly describe?

                  Your comments about not letting him settle in are well taken. Although I practice in a sport setting, ultimately this is for self-defense and I don't want to leave myself open to pounding.

                  For the earlier replier - Yeah, I am fairly flexible, that is one good thing I have despite my age. Do you mean on a high mount I can try to hook around his upper body with my legs and then either pull his upper body backwards or pull myself under?

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                    #10
                    I just simply lift my legs up and try to push him forward by his armpits. Then I just scramble out from in between his legs and fight for position as he turns around. I'm sure it's not the best escape in the world, but it works.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by OldDog53
                      Upa is feet flat and knees bent, push up the hips, right? Does it matter whether the mount is low or high?

                      I don't know the elbow escape sequence at all. Can you briefly describe?

                      Your comments about not letting him settle in are well taken. Although I practice in a sport setting, ultimately this is for self-defense and I don't want to leave myself open to pounding.

                      For the earlier replier - Yeah, I am fairly flexible, that is one good thing I have despite my age. Do you mean on a high mount I can try to hook around his upper body with my legs and then either pull his upper body backwards or pull myself under?
                      sorry, but how long have you been training? you should be shown both of those within the first week or two. upa requires you to trap a foot and arm on one side (either one, as long as it's the same); then you bridge hard to that side, looking over the same-side shoulder. if you do it right, you'll end up in top in your opponent's guard.

                      you may know the elbow escape by another name; here are some videos:

                      http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...haya+bjj&hl=en

                      http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...haya+bjj&hl=en

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                        #12
                        I thought the Upa technique was the standard first day lesson. What kind of BJJ have you been learning and for how long?

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by OldDog53
                          Upa is feet flat and knees bent, push up the hips, right? Does it matter whether the mount is low or high?

                          I don't know the elbow escape sequence at all. Can you briefly describe?
                          You typically cannot upa out of a high mount. This is because one of the three or four keys to a successful upa is your bridge and if the guys hips are not closer to yours your bridge looses most of its effect and may actually slide the guy down into a tighter, higher, mount. Also, unless you have freakishly long legs, it should be hard to secure the leg of the guy whose has high mounted you.

                          I am equally confused about your lack of knowledge/experience with the upa and elbow escape. In one of your other threads/posts you stated that you are able to attend BJJ once per week; but even at that limited amount you should have drilled both of these escapes from almost day 1. If you haven't, you need to ASAP. Go to class early and ask one of the instructors, or one of the upper belts to run through these escapes with you.

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                            #14
                            I agree that the Upa+Elbow Escape are the best. Repeat reapeat and repeat some more. It may take awhile to actually pull off though in sparring. Just keep doing it. I used to look for other ways to get out because I couldnt get them to work. I always ended up waiting to be armbarred and then would counter. Now I can escape though. Just keep trying.
                            Port Jefferson Martial Arts - My Gym
                            Port Jefferson Martial Arts - My Blog

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by G8
                              sorry, but how long have you been training? you should be shown both of those within the first week or two. upa requires you to trap a foot and arm on one side (either one, as long as it's the same); then you bridge hard to that side, looking over the same-side shoulder. if you do it right, you'll end up in top in your opponent's guard.

                              you may know the elbow escape by another name; here are some videos:

                              http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...haya+bjj&hl=en

                              http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...haya+bjj&hl=en
                              Seven classes. In my first class (almost a private class due to small attendance) they started by showing me a basic move to pass the guard and how to apply an armlock from mount. I wouldn't fault my club, I just don't go to many classes on a once per week schedule (the other poster is right that even one additional class would help me a lot, but right now I get so beat up by my single class that I am wary of stepping back on the mat while still "under repair"). You guys are helping me out a lot here and I appreciate it. The two google videos you linked me to are great, and I am going to drill them at home this week.

                              Also keep in mind my club is caught between a rock and a hard place. They can either pull me out of class and drill basics, or let me just do what the rest of the class is doing, which may be all over the map.

                              It's the way my stepdaughter is learning English. They don't have separate instructors for her. They just let her pick up her English, on the fly, in regular classes. Sometimes she (and I in jiu jitsu) feel like we are sinking, and at other times we feel like we are swimming.

                              My fingers are sprained, my arms are bruised, and my ribs are finally recovering from a tight squeeze/twist a couple of weeks ago, but nothing is broken and won't repair quickly. All in all I wouldn't have it any other way. But I DO want to do as much homework as possible so I can catch up!

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