Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Choosing fighting styles / Planning training / Basic doubts

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Choosing fighting styles / Planning training / Basic doubts

    if I can't avoid getting involved in a fight.

    I've practised Shotokan Karate as a kid, but even if that meant anything, there is nothing left of it, so I'm starting with a clean slate, as a complete beginner.

    I'm tall and lean rather than stocky, and not heavily built. I have sharp reflexes when shit hits the fan.

    As a starting point for a continuous effort to improve, I'm deciding what kind of training I'll do for the next five years, and I want to ask you about that.
    • What do you think would work better:
      • To focus on a single fighting style and dedicate the entire period (or most of it) to it? I'd been considering Muay Thai or Judo for that.

      • To divide the period between different styles and move from each to the next one? I'd been thinking Judo -> Muay Thai -> BJJ.

      • Or to pick a "central" style and use others to complement it as I go? My original plan was Muay Thai + Judo and BJJ.

        What would you recommend, and why?
    aforementioned topic for details on my background and current circumstances.

    Thank you very much.

    #2
    Honestly you would be better investing your time and energy into gaining a skill that will allow you to get a work visa someplace safer.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by goodlun View Post
      Honestly you would be better investing your time and energy into gaining a skill that will allow you to get a work visa someplace safer.
      I am already working on it—using five years as a reference point relates to that. Not only accommodating martial arts training won't in any way jeopardize my plans, I believe it will help me grow in ways that will actually support them.

      Comment


        #4
        So, similarly to goodlun's post and the consensus in the other thread, I'll point out that you're missing an over-arching point, specifically, that a realistic goal for unarmed fighting is to be able to prevail over an unarmed opponent roughly your size. Huge dude? You lose. Weapon? You lose, probably die, if the attacker chooses. Group? You lose. If you've lived in the environment you say, I'm sure you're an least subconsciously aware of this.

        Irrespective of environment, true self defense begins with avoidance, de-escalation and escape. In the event that those fail, and you're not legally permitted to bear arms, I could argue that judo mixed with enough striking training to know not to get one-shotted gives you the best chance to put an attacker on the ground so you can flee, but again, big guy, group, weapon, and you're in trouble regardless.

        Comment


          #5
          Are any guns legal where you live? If it's somewhere in Latin America where "military calibers" are restricted I would recommend getting a 1911 chambered in .38 mexican.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
            Are any guns legal where you live? If it's somewhere in Latin America where "military calibers" are restricted I would recommend getting a 1911 chambered in .38 mexican.
            this is really shitty advice by itself. just owning a firearm is pointless. if firearms are an option and that is the route you choose to take, you need to become an expert on that weapon; how to use it, drawing from concealment, etc.

            you're not advising on home protection, ghost. whoever is assailing our man here has probably already got the drop on him and drawing/attempting to draw a firearm is probably the last thing he needs to be thinking about.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by ermghoti View Post
              So, similarly to goodlun's post and the consensus in the other thread, I'll point out that you're missing an over-arching point, specifically, that a realistic goal for unarmed fighting is to be able to prevail over an unarmed opponent roughly your size. Huge dude? You lose. Weapon? You lose, probably die, if the attacker chooses. Group? You lose. If you've lived in the environment you say, I'm sure you're an least subconsciously aware of this.

              Irrespective of environment, true self defense begins with avoidance, de-escalation and escape. In the event that those fail, and you're not legally permitted to bear arms, I could argue that judo mixed with enough striking training to know not to get one-shotted gives you the best chance to put an attacker on the ground so you can flee, but again, big guy, group, weapon, and you're in trouble regardless.
              BJJ is particularly good at giving less than athletic people, and/or people of smaller size have a shot of surviving a potential beat down by a single larger opponent.

              All real combat sports offer some value in this regard, especially if the bigger or more athletic opponent is not similiarly well trained.

              That said, size and athletic ability definitely matter, and even someone with excellent technique is in trouble if a larger opponent hits them on the button, or slams them, or manages to get to a compromising smash position.
              Last edited by Dr. Gonzo; 4/02/2017 10:33am, .

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by itwasntme View Post
                this is really shitty advice by itself. just owning a firearm is pointless. if firearms are an option and that is the route you choose to take, you need to become an expert on that weapon; how to use it, drawing from concealment, etc.

                you're not advising on home protection, ghost. whoever is assailing our man here has probably already got the drop on him and drawing/attempting to draw a firearm is probably the last thing he needs to be thinking about.
                It's a better option than trying to box with someone that has a knife. I thought that it would seem obvious that part of getting a gun for self defense would include a shitload of practice. Guns are tools, and tools are useless if you don't know how to use them. I agree with the people saying OP needs to stop living in a shithole, but barring that as well as continuing to be fairly passive, I suspect a gun is the least stupid option.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
                  It's a better option than trying to box with someone that has a knife. I thought that it would seem obvious that part of getting a gun for self defense would include a shitload of practice. Guns are tools, and tools are useless if you don't know how to use them. I agree with the people saying OP needs to stop living in a shithole, but barring that as well as continuing to be fairly passive, I suspect a gun is the least stupid option.
                  If you watch the Dog Brothers pack gatherings, the knife as the off hand weapon to a short stick or long stick in the dominant hand really makes grappling seem like a perilous option in such a situation.
                  The grapplers tend to clinch to avoid the stick strike in the dominant hand and end up getting shanked numerous times by the off hand knife as grappling is initiated.
                  That said, I am not a Dog Brother, just a Dog Brother fan, double check what I just with Crafty Dog or Permalost.
                  So, I in general agree, ranged weapon like a gun is very good, presuming you are well trained and legally allowed to carry, and empty hand against a knife sucks, even for highly trained people.
                  Last edited by Dr. Gonzo; 4/02/2017 10:54am, .

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
                    I suspect a gun is the least stupid option.
                    i hear you. it's all about mindset.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by ermghoti View Post
                      So, similarly to goodlun's post and the consensus in the other thread, I'll point out that you're missing an over-arching point, specifically, that a realistic goal for unarmed fighting is to be able to prevail over an unarmed opponent roughly your size. Huge dude? You lose. Weapon? You lose, probably die, if the attacker chooses. Group? You lose. If you've lived in the environment you say, I'm sure you're an least subconsciously aware of this.

                      Irrespective of environment, true self defense begins with avoidance, de-escalation and escape. In the event that those fail, and you're not legally permitted to bear arms, I could argue that judo mixed with enough striking training to know not to get one-shotted gives you the best chance to put an attacker on the ground so you can flee, but again, big guy, group, weapon, and you're in trouble regardless.
                      A guy spends years learning his Aikido, he's gotten his black belt, and it's so easy for him to send his peers flyingcriminalmustbecause I've learned to tread lightly. I can't remember how many times I was able to neutralize serious shit coming in my direction by using my brain; only onceifare times when being able to defend oneself in a physical combat isvery good reason.

                      Indeed, I've already used my one-time-only Be Naive About Martial Arts card. When I was small I watched Karate Kidanddon't

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
                        Are any guns legal where you live? If it's somewhere in Latin America where "military calibers" are restricted I would recommend getting a 1911 chambered in .38 mexican.
                        exceptional
                        Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                        BJJ is particularly good at giving less than athletic people, and/or people of smaller size have a shot of surviving a potential beat down by a single larger opponent.

                        All real combat sports offer some value in this regard, especially if the bigger or more athletic opponent is not similiarly well trained.

                        That said, size and athletic ability definitely matter, and even someone with excellent technique is in trouble if a larger opponent hits them on the button, or slams them, or manages to get to a compromising smash position.
                        Oh, yes, I've seen some examples of what you're saying about BJJ, WFMurphyPhD, and also some related to Judo. But I've also seen enough of poor Gung Fu guys taking some gruelling beatings from MMA fighters, so I surely won't underestimate size and build!

                        Originally posted by ghost55 View Post
                        It's a better option than trying to box with someone that has a knife. I thought that it would seem obvious that part of getting a gun for self defense would include a shitload of practice. Guns are tools, and tools are useless if you don't know how to use them. I agree with the people saying OP needs to stop living in a shithole, but barring that as well as continuing to be fairly passive, I suspect a gun is the least stupid option.
                        Professional training is one of the requirements to get the permit.

                        Originally posted by WFMurphyPhD View Post
                        So, I in general agree, ranged weapon like a gun is very good, presuming you are well trained and legally allowed to carry, and empty hand against a knife sucks, even for highly trained people.
                        "They pull a knife, you pull a gun. Chicago way, all the way." Hard to apply here, though. Isn't it ironic? In a country whose homicide rates in times of peace literally top those of warring countries, a place where we have underage crackheads with shotguns, carrying melee weapons, even the simple penknife, is also enough to get one arrested. Because fuck us, I suppose.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I would start working on getting the permit then. "This country sucks" might not be enough, but "I seem to get held up and mugged constantly" might work.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Also you may want to consider the possibility that you may be able to expedite the process by paying some additional "unlisted" fees....

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Short Timer? View Post
                              However, I've grown up in the hostile environment I've alluded to in my posts, I'm not the new kid in the block, having unreasonable expectations about survival. No, I've been here long enough to have seen again and again what happens to those who overestimate themselves and underestimate our environment—I've seen people beaten, sliced, shot over nothing. I know the rules—and I surely know that no martial art will ever enable me to dodge or stop bullets fired at me.

                              I'm only alive because I've learned to tread lightly. I can't remember how many times I was able to neutralize serious shit coming in my direction by using my brain; only once I was caught unaware and had to resort to fighting instead of cunning—and the entire "fight" consisted of my distracting him, punching him in the throat, and running the fuck away.

                              [clip]
                              Learning martial arts is not a flick for me—I intend it to be a lifelong striving—so I plan to be here long-term, and I hope I will get to now most of you better—and vice-versa. I know there's much for me to learn, and I'm sure you guys have a lot to teach.
                              So, really, do what you will enjoy. I know people that do aikido because they like doing aikido. Nobody really has a problem with that. If you want to do a combat sport, I'm all for it, any of them will have "real life" applications, but it's still more about personal taste at that point. The BJJ that you train four days a week will do a lot better than the MT you quit after six classes, for example. You're looking for the highest quality instruction (eg, produces successful competitors) in an art that will hold your interest. We don't really do style vs style around here, so much as live training>cooperative training>made up silliness.

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X