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    UKE

    working together

    In order for a beginner to learn Judo its vital that they have a good uke. And as the beginner progresses through intermediate to advanced the importance of a good uke not only remains, but the importance of them being a good uke becomes ever more important.

    So how do you become a good uke?

    Well it starts with the foundation...

    UkemiAppropriate practice

    White belts should not be made to take falls from complex throws early in their Judo experience.

    Rather the amount of time they are actually thrown outside of highly controlled circumstances should be minimised

    Appropriate pairingYOUA good UkeCommon errors

    By far and away the most common errors beginners make when being an uke are Jigotai-ing and stepping off.

    Jigotai-ingWant an incentive to help you ensure you do regulate yourself?You as uke are more likely to get hurt.

    Stepping OffStiff Arming

    But how do I...?What next?

    There are a couple of simple things you can do become a better uke.

    Allowing yourself to be made ready to be thrown

    An advanced Judoka like the tori in the video does these two things naturally.

    However as a beginner you need to learn to psychologically and mentally reassure yourself of your safety and the lack of danger in order yourself to allow yourself to be made ready to be thrown and then as a consequence enable your tori to make you made ready to be thrown.

    Understanding the throw being done to youto T-upConclusions

    UkemiSelf-regulationBe Active not PassiveAbove All

    Mutual benefit and welfare.

    The better uke you are, the better your club mates will be.

    The better your practice partners, the better you will get.

    Greatness begets greatness.

    Work on being a good uke, it will make you a better Judo player in the long run.

    Happy New Year.
    sigpic

    #2
    An important lesson, and one that's rarely ever taught (or even thought about).

    +1, happy new year.

    Comment


      #3
      Well done sir, never thought about being active as uke before, will have to keep that in mind come judo time.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by judojeff View Post
        Well done sir, never thought about being active as uke before, will have to keep that in mind come judo time.
        Thanks.

        I'm going to lower the tone here but, fuck it.

        When I was younger I remember a conversation with a virginal girlfriend about how her main concern about her first experience was that it would be 'log like' i.e her just lieing there having it done to her and not actually getting any pleasure from sex just being an accessory to the act.

        I think this is kind of informative for how many people see being an uke, except in perverse reverse.

        Many people treat being an uke as time to be 'the log' they'll stare off into the distance, think about what they're having for tea and generally disassociate themselves from the activity.

        Neil Adams has talked about how Judoka just bang out uchikomi without thinking as a routine, but I think the opposite is more problematic. Uke's just letting uchikomi be done to them without thought.

        When I uke for a 50-100 rep uchikomi set I'm almost as tired as tori, because I've been sinking my weight, letting it rise, tilting my body into the throw, assisting his movements etc...

        If you aren't tired after uke-ing for decent number of reps you aren't being a good uke. Sure you shouldn't be shagged after uke-ing for 10 uchikomi, but if we get to big numbers you should be working and working hard.

        This becomes even more important on the move. As uke we have to concentrate super hard on what our tori is doing and going to be doing.

        And you know what if you mess up or aren't sure.

        Just bloody talk to them.

        As a tori I always say to my uke, if we're doing moving nagekomi 'I'm going to do Sasae, step off it, then I'm going to throw with tai otoshi, ok?' They acknowledge and then they know their job and what I'm going to do.

        Similarly if the class has been working on a series of combos and I get called out with a beginner to demo a pair. I always say to them 'What are you going to do?' And they tell me, so I make them fix it in their their minds, for example, 'OK so I'll step off you O uchi gari, you'll T up and then you'll throw me with Uchi mata, is that right?' They agree.

        And then not only do I know, that I know what they're going to do. I've reassured and reminded them what they have to do. As beginners always forget under pressure of a demo, always.

        As I concluded the article with its about 'mutual benefit and welfare' or in simple terms, just being considerate.
        sigpic

        Comment


          #5
          This needs making into an article for the wiki.

          Judoka_uk, do you mind if I do just that ? Full credit will be given to you of course.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Ho Ho Fcuk You ! View Post
            This needs making into an article for the wiki.

            Judoka_uk, do you mind if I do just that ? Full credit will be given to you of course.
            Cheers.

            Yeh sure, go ahead, didn't realise the site had a technique wiki.

            Looking back there's a couple of typos that could do with fixing. If you PM me an e-mail address I can send you the word file I wrote it in so you've got all the picture and video links easily and don't have to dig them out of the post in this thread.
            sigpic

            Comment


              #7
              Nice work once again.

              I've been telling my students they will often be judged by senior judoka (those senior judoka who actually know Judo well, at least) more on how good an uke they are than how good a tori. It shows a more true understanding of the aims and principles of Judo than being able to toss people around.

              At more advanced levels of practice, uke becomes even more critical. You can't do complex grip/countergrip move throw action reaction drills without an uke who reacts properly.

              Ben
              Falling for Judo since 1980

              "You are wrong. Why? Because you move like a pregnant yak and talk like a spazzing 'I train UFC' noob." -DCS

              "The best part of getting you worked up is your backpack full of irony and lies." -It Is Fake

              "Banning BKR is like kicking a Quokka. It's foolishness of the first order." - Raycetpfl

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by BKR View Post
                Nice work once again.
                Cheers.

                Originally posted by BKR View Post
                I've been telling my students they will often be judged by senior judoka (those senior judoka who actually know Judo well, at least) more on how good an uke they are than how good a tori.
                Absolutely, I judge people on their ability to uke. As it reveals all sorts of things about their Judo, how they move, how they breakfall, how they react to the responsibility etc...

                Originally posted by BKR View Post
                It shows a more true understanding of the aims and principles of Judo than being able to toss people around.
                I agree, I've reverse engineered quite a few of the things I know about Judo through being an uke. Dynamic delay is probably the best example of what I developed an understanding of through uke-ing.

                Learning how to control my movement to ensure my partners Okuri ashi barai was successful was how I came to understand dynamic delay.
                sigpic

                Comment


                  #9
                  thanks for this one. I wish all clubs started white belts off with this knowledge. Mine kinda just throws you in with the sharks.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Thanks for that guide j_uk, no doubt I will find myself referring back to this throughout my judo journey!

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by judoka_uk View Post
                      Cheers.

                      Yeh sure, go ahead, didn't realise the site had a technique wiki.

                      Looking back there's a couple of typos that could do with fixing. If you PM me an e-mail address I can send you the word file I wrote it in so you've got all the picture and video links easily and don't have to dig them out of the post in this thread.
                      http://www.bullshido.org/Judo_ukemi

                      Just need to embed the video links when I can remember what the wiki code for that is, lol.

                      Please check it over and let me know what if anything you want changing.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        The article is also now featured on the front page

                        http://www.bullshido.org/Main_Page

                        Comment


                          #13
                          even totalluy drenched in whiskey i can tell j_uk's post is great. good job

                          +1

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Again, another excellent post by Judoka_Uk. Thanks for taking the time to write these. As an orange belt... soon to be testing for green... ukemi is tough for me. I take consolation from my instructor's story that he did not get good at ukemi until he was a brown belt when he had to learn kata.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Thank you very much for this article, +1 of course and varrots as many as I can give.

                              On a sidenote: I did judo when I was 12 (only made it to Orange in that time) but if I had had someone explain it to me like this, I would've been so much better. Kids understand this stuff as well but in my school it was like this: No, you won't throw me, my ego forbids it. I never got told to be active when being thrown.

                              This makes me want to re-visit Judo and see how I would do nowadays (combined with knowledge like yours).

                              Thank you again,
                              Phil

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