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    Hello, need some suggestions

    Hello all,

    Been browsing this site for a while now and decided to join up to get some advice. Ive been thinking about getting into a martial art but not sure which one would compliment my current boxing training. Though i havent trained in my boxing for a while it has helped me throughout my younger years. I am looking for a MA that will help me utilize my legs a bit more with some takedowns rolled in there. A friend of mine suggested Hapkido. I did some research and it seems like there is a stigma that it only works if the attacker grabs your wrist. While not the aggressive type i have had a few rumbles growing up and very few times have i seen someone go for my wrists. Right hook to the face, sure. But grabbing my wrist...not very. I was about to dismiss Hapkido all together until i stumbled on this video.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=760JCpYJMVk

    While alot of his attacks are a bit flashy i saw some solid techs. Mostly the legsweeps/throws and his leg work during his boxing demo. Now i am a bit confused as I didn't see much wrist grabbing from the attacker. Is this a different style of hapkido that doesnt focus on wrist grabbing?

    Anyways. I am not stuck on Hapkido, it was just one that a friend suggested i look into, and willing to look to other MA's as well. Thank you for your time.

    #2
    yay, good old one steps. this video is meaningless to real fighting.

    Comment


      #3
      I'd give Hapkido a miss, first of all.

      What sort of MAs are available in your area?

      Muay Thai would be a fairly natural progression from your boxing, as would, I guess, Kyokushin/Ashihara/Enshin Karate.

      On the grappling front, Judo is avaiable pretty much anywhere. BJJ is slightly rarer, and you'd be lucky to find a Sambo school.
      Of course, you could always look around for an MMA gym.

      Whereabouts are you situated?

      Stu xD

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by carbonwerkz View Post
        Good play acting...
        I've seen better moves from
        YouTube- Tai Chi Wrestling (taijiquan shuai jiao)

        Many of the moves demonstrated would barely stun an obstinate man/woman from dealing serious pain, much less cause off-balance or falling.

        A better art would be to learn a martial art that can deal with engagements between 0" ~ 4". Boxing handles 4" ~ 8" engagements pretty decently if your gym's instructors have experience vs. kick styles. Muay Thai/Ashihara/Enshin/SAMBO handles this decently as you'll learn to defend below the belt.

        I would recommend Muay Thai as its stance and footwork is similar to modern boxing.

        Remember unlike the ring, there's no one there to reset the fight when it goes to clinch.

        Your journey into MA is just beginning.

        Comment


          #5
          muay thais footwork is not like boxing at all really.

          Comment


            #6
            Combat Sambo:

            YouTube- Fedor Emelianenko vs. Kamil Chrobak (Combat Sambo)

            Muay Thai + Judo:

            YouTube- Ramon Dekkers Muay Thai

            +

            YouTube- best of judo

            Looks more like real fighting than the Hapkido, doesn't it! And you want to now why? Because it's real fighting (with some minimum restrictions).
            Originally posted by Jiujitsu77
            You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
            Originally posted by Humanzee
            ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
            Originally posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
            It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
            The real deadly:

            Comment


              #7
              Thank you guys for the info. So a blend of MT and Judo would be a good mix. Are there any styles that incorporate them together or would it be best to learn them separate? Also Alex, seeing as you actively train with MT, what are the differences between MT and Boxing footwork?

              Ps. Located in West LA (el segundo, venice, santa monica area)

              Comment


                #8
                You don't have to worry about checking leg kicks in Boxing.

                If you're in LA, you've got plenty of options.

                Comment


                  #9
                  the traditional thai stance consists of having the majority of your weight on the back foot, and the only person who boxes like that is mayweather. reason being what phrost said- if you have a boxers stance, with more weight forward and a wider stance, you are gonna eat leg kicks all day long. result is that a pure boxing stance usually looks more like this-


                  vs a MT stance that looks more like this-

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Ah i see. Thank you Alex. When i did spar with a MT guy a long time ago he did leg check me alot. My shin was screaming by the end of it but it was a fun bout. Always been a out-boxer who tried to develop my hits for more power to help be a little more well rounded. Also helped that i had a strong chin so i am told. While i see now that weight is carried differently, does that mess with power delivery in punches? As when i step in for a punch more weight is on my front and helps with upper rotation when punching. In MT are you shifting your weight from back to front alot or are punches less focused on for damage then kicks are?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Personally, I shift my weight from back to front, but that may be because my Muay Thai is corrupted by Panantukan, Filipino Boxing.

                      Apparently, this is a tell for some people I've sparred with, as they can figure out whether I'm just feeling them out/probing or fully committed based on how I shift my weight. In my case, I have to work on not being so obvious through better body mechanics, but I've also learned to use my kicks a plenty to cover this up.

                      Some schools I've visited don't put much emphasis on damaging punches at all. Rather, the damaging ranges are kicking range and the clinch (knees and elbows).

                      Maybe a more seasoned fighter can give you a more definite answer.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I'm by no means a seasoned fighter, but I agree with you about the lower emphasis on power punching.

                        It's going to vary from place to place, with traditional places emphasising using the square on, marching style of movement to throw some big low kicks before clinching and finishing, and the more western style of using boxing-ish moves to set stuff up.

                        You do learn to throw big punches, but the availability of elbows and knees diminishes their relative merit, and the need to chain them in with kicks makes it harder to get the right positioning to use them. When I first started doing MT, my coach told me my hook was too tight. I couldn't understand how this could be, until he explained that I was throwing it in elbow range. Then there's the difference in defence, where you have to defend a lot more low shots.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I guess with MT, traditional boxing punches are not as effective compared to close up knees and elbows on a clinch but hopefully my previous boxing techs continue to help.

                          Some of you recommended Judo as a good grappling/groundwork. Groundwork is very foreign to me as i was always taught to stay up and keep mobile. Any good info/pointers on Judo i should know? And dont worry i will also use the search button. Thank you.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Search for a Judo club that trains 50% tachi-waza (stand-up clinching/throws) and 50% ne-waza (groundfight).

                            Also see that the groundfight ends with submission techniques (armbar, triangle, collarchoke, etc...) and not just a pin (pushing the two shoulders of your opponent against the ground).

                            About Muay Thai/Thai Boxing: you shift your weight upon your first leg when you do a boxing combination. IMMEDIATLY after the boxing techniques you shift your weight back on the last leg (maximum effect of the boxing without staying long vulnerable for leg checks).
                            Originally posted by Jiujitsu77
                            You know you are crazy about BJJ/Martial arts when...
                            Originally posted by Humanzee
                            ...your books on Kama Sutra and BJJ are interchangeable.
                            Originally posted by jk55299 on Keysi Fighting Method
                            It looks like this is a great fighting method if someone replaces your shampoo with superglue.
                            The real deadly:

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I've never heard much about judo apart from this site. I've found it just fine to train BJJ in an MMA school, the idea being that the transitioning from stand-up to the ground will be covered via wrestling and judo take-downs. Not always the case, though.

                              I went from McDojo krotty to boxing, from boxing to Panantukan (which I recommend to every striker), and finally from Panantukan to JKD Concepts/PFS and Muay Thai/BJJ. I've noticed a dramatic shift in footwork, so much so that the boxing techniques are completely ineffective for me during sparring matches. I've developed certain crutches, like reliance on kicks for entries, clinching up, hitting outside angles, and going to the ground, such that the boxer in me has atrophied.

                              I suppose, however, if you developed a mean punch, a good slip/bob and weave, you could use those to your advantage in a fight as the average MT guy won't be expecting someone with good punching game. Just understand that you'll be training differently and therefore will lose some skills in exchange for others.

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