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    Martial Arts Style Suggestions

    Hi I'm new to the site (if you couldn't tell already) so first off Hi everyone! Now down to the point. I'm also new to martial arts (only having done some on and off for the past year or so). I've been doing TKD and Judo (like I said new so no real belts yet). I am a senior at my school and will be graduating and moving to who-knows-where yet. I was trying to look through the site to find a martial arts style that I might try. I'm looking for primarily two things in the style:

    1) "Real World" use. I.E. Street fighting capabilities. I like both TKD and Judo for they fill out this part quite well for me and I actually enjoy both. However they both (to my knowledge) don't fill out my second point.

    2) Weapons. I know that weapons training (was thinking staff mostly but I'm open to swords or other suggestions) aren't very practical for real world instances I mean come on, how likely is it that you'll have a sword or a staff at hand in a fight? Anyways this point is mostly for just the "mood" and showiness of it. I would probably be using this for competitions and just plain personal pleasure of training with a tool other than my hands and feet.

    Do any of you have any suggestions of styles that I might look into and possibly some threads you might redirect me to to learn more? As I mentioned before I only have this year and I'm not sure where I'll be moving to after college but when I do move I plan on getting more serious with my Martial Arts and wanted to have an idea(s) of the styles I might be interested in to look into once I DO find out where I'm going.

    Thanks,
    Major

    #2
    How bout a Chinese Martial Art..

    Comment


      #3
      My suggestion would be that you stop viewing things from the style vs. style perspective. First, because there is some truth in the cliche "it's not the art, it's the artist", and second, even if we could objectively define The-Ideal-Style-For-Major, that infomation wouldn't help you if the city you eventually land in doesn't offer said style.

      You lay out two criteria you have for a prospective style so my suggestion would be this: Continue reading Bullshido and other sites to learn what kinds of questions you should ask when evaluating a school, visit the places in your area and determine first hand, as best you can, whether or not they meet your needs without worrying so much what banner they practice under. Bear in mind though, you may need to make compromises, as not every community will offer a wide array of options to choose from.
      Or you could take a shortcut. You say say you practice and like TKD and judo, so you may as well just continue with those. TKD dojangs, of varying levels of quality, abound from sea to shining sea and judo, I've heard, is also cheap and widely available. Weapons? That brings us back to availability and "take what you can get".

      One other suggestion. Questions like this are better suited to Newbietown unless your question is, quite specifically, "Which CMA has strikes like TKD, throws like judo, and moody, showy staff techniques?"

      Comment


        #4
        Boxing or Muay Thai would fit better with judo.. but if you're anything like 101% of all TKDers you won't listen.

        want to use swords? do fencing/kendo - they actually fight with the "swords".. or Wushu if you want to LARP
        "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
        Spoiler:

        Comment


          #5
          Stick with the Judo if you can it will benefit you in the long run. Get out of TKD while you can before you get brainwashed.

          As far as weapons go find a stick fighting group in you area. This is the most practical weapon training you will ever do in your life besides learning how to properly use a pistol. Be careful with the stick fighters though they tend to run the retard spectrum as much as the TKD people. If you can find a Dog Brother in your area that will be your best bet.

          Kendo is very cool as well as fencing but very expensive if you have to buy a lot of gear.
          Judo is only gentle for the guy on top.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by dougguod View Post
            You say say you practice and like TKD and judo, so you may as well just continue with those. TKD dojangs, of varying levels of quality, abound from sea to shining sea and judo, I've heard, is also cheap and widely available. Weapons? That brings us back to availability and "take what you can get".
            Good Points!

            Please understand as you grow-up there will always be outside pressures on M.A. study decisions. Establishing your (future) career may dictate where you live as a twenty-something, or your S.O. wants to live near her parents out in the countryside etc. The cost of being in love is only superseded by the cost of a divorce.
            :lol:

            But if you are lucky to be a "leaf on the wind" post your college days - then choosing to live in a large US metropolitan area - or near a large college town in the boonies - will enhance your choice of possibilities.

            Comment


              #7
              Judo, Boxing. These are both inexpensive and widely available. Given the fact that your college years, and the half dozen after graduation, will be spent on a shoestring budget cheap is good.

              For weapons, as was stated above, look for a good Arnis or Kali group. If you can find a Pakiti Tirsai group, join them. Look for a club that focuses on single stick work, and knife work. These will be the most applicable to day-to-day use.
              I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

              Comment


                #8
                For practicality stick with Judo if you can. If you're looking for something new then check out any of the component arts common in MMA. Try brazilian jiu-jitsu, boxing, muay thai, wrestling or sombo (if you can find them).

                It sounds like you know that weapons won't be practical & you just want to do them for fun. I respect that. Have you looked into HEMA? Medieval martial arts include the use of spear, sword, dagger & grappling.

                Where are you living now? Where are you moving after you finish school? Maybe people could recommend specific schools.

                Comment


                  #9
                  i'm going to stop you at, "taekwondo satisfies the 'good for the streets' component".

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Weapons. I know that weapons training (was thinking staff mostly but I'm open to swords or other suggestions) aren't very practical for real world instances I mean come on, how likely is it that you'll have a sword or a staff at hand in a fight? Anyways this point is mostly for just the "mood" and showiness of it. I would probably be using this for competitions and just plain personal pleasure of training with a tool other than my hands and feet.
                    If you're just wanting to have fun, then I'd definitely suggest kendo. As someone said, the start up fees are reasonably high (starting at about $500 for a beginner's set of armor and other assorted gear), however kendo is by far the cheapest martial art I've found. The reason for this is that Kendo is big on the whole non-profit ideal, and you will likely spend significantly less per month than other styles.

                    Also, you said you were interested in staff fighting. The thing about the japanese weapon arts is that they tend to stick together. If you're doing kendo, an iaido school will likely be close by, and if you're doing iaido, a jodo (use of a staff against a sword wielding opponent) school won't be too far off. They complement each other quite well too.

                    Also, someone mentioned the dog brothers, a great school if you're wanting something a little more practical than fencing

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Sweet thanks everyone. I'll keep those points in mind as I continue to search (more likely wait upon where I'm going).

                      Comment


                        #12
                        First of all, I'd recommend you take a look at the FAQ (if that's broken, use this link) on finding a good martial arts school. In general, signs to look for are a competitive record, regular heavy contact sparring and 'aliveness' (if you're unfamiliar with the term, Matt Thornton has a long article on the topic describing what it is and why it's important: he is the man most associated with popularising the concept. One of his students also has a good piece on aliveness).

                        If your interest is mainly in striking, the safest option if you want decent training is muay thai (which you'll also see as 'thai boxing'), along with martial arts like boxing and kyokushin karate. That's not to say there aren't good schools within other striking styles, but they tend to vary widely in quality.

                        If you're more interested in grappling, then BJJ would be an excellent choice, as the strong competitive element and ability-based ranking system generally results in high quality training. A cheaper option is judo, which is also much easier to find - the two styles are closely related, the main difference being that judo normally focuses on throws whereas BJJ is mostly about the ground. For more on judo, read the Bullshido.com article and FAQ. For BJJ, you could check my BJJ Beginner FAQ. SAMBO is another good choice, but even harder to find than BJJ. Then there's wrestling, which is also great training for grappling.

                        Alternately, you could combine grappling and striking by cross-training in several arts, or at an MMA gym (though technically 'MMA' is a ruleset rather than a specific style). Examples of well known MMA gyms would be Team Quest and Miletich Fighting Systems.

                        Finally, you could try having a look through the dojo reviews section, which might yield something more specific to your area, or use the search function (the link is at the top right of the page).

                        There are also several school databases you could try. For example, for BJJ:

                        TrainJiuJitsu.com
                        Gym Database (BJJ, MMA etc)
                        UK Club Map
                        BJJ Beginner FAQ, Artemis BJJ, GrappleThon.org (BJJ for Charity)

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