Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

What doesn't suck?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #31
    muay thai why not savate mon ami . I start to hate muay thai because this art can blind people too much . the science off the 8 limb pffff . A style like that have less evasion but good kick.

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by madrigan View Post
      There are many forms of Aikido, but as practiced in the United States it seems to be primarily concerned with the physical expression of a religious ideal rather than with fighting. Some Aikido practitioners -- and here I'm just referring to comments I've seen online, not to some scientific study of all Aikido students -- seem to have a moral objection to the ideas of aggression, fighting, or sparring. Because of this, in general, Aikido training does not get respect from people who feel that the martial arts are for fighting, which includes most people who post on Bullshido.
      Let me go off on a tangent if you will.


      Martial arts were originally designed for fighting.

      What's the point of learning a martial art if the "martial" part is completely removed? All it is then is no more than an interpretive dance form of fighting. Think West Side Story and the knife fight.

      This is the problem most people have with those so called martial arts is that their truly is no martial aspect to it anymore; it is so removed from its original purpose, that any philosophical or moral aspects you could get from it have little to no value anymore.

      You see, it's easy to do an art like aikido and tell others that violence is bad and aggression gets you no where, but unless you experience these for yourself and learn to deal with it, which sparring helps people to do among other things, then what you say on the issue holds little weight, because you truly don't know how to deal with it. /serious
      Originally posted by Nicko1
      Martial Talk is not neutral, it's just neutered.

      Comment


        #33
        what suck in wing chun is their stance not its technique.

        every art are not perfect even today

        Comment


          #34
          akido tech are good its even better than judo

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by smartangel View Post
            akido tech are good its even better than judo
            Oh god, please stop shitting up every thread under the sun. Here's how:

            1. Stop posting.
            2. Learn to type in proper English sentences.
            3. Only post when you have something reasonable, thought-out, and meaningful to say.
            What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates

            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by smartangel View Post
              akido tech are good its even better than judo
              Ok... Seriously? The hell?

              Judo is leaps and bounds better then 99.9% of Aikido and Wing Chun sucks. Period.

              If you disagree with me then level a formal challenge, travel to Rochester, and let us discuss things kinetically.

              Edit: I am totally not kidding, please come to Rochester so I can hit you.
              I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

              Comment


                #37
                Where did Tae Kwon Do, mainstream Karate, Aikido, and similar go wrong?

                Basically, they stopped being about hurting people and started to be about health, sporting, loving the universe, and so forth. In the case of Taijiquan, that happened centuries ago. With Aikido, it was a founding principle of the art in the 1920's.

                For other styles, I think the late 70's and the 80's had a lot to do with it. Thanks to the influence of Bruce Lee, the ninja craze, TMNT, Daniel-san, etc, karate was breaking out of obscurity and becoming a household word. At that time Karate was trained strictly and sparring was harsh: no or minimal pads with head contact and sweeps allowed, and Chuck Norris won a few championships using Tang Soo Do, a half-brother to TKD, and was acknowledged all-around as a bad-ass.

                But with popularity inevitably comes kids, and with kids come parents who don't like the idea of their children sustaining recreational concussions in what is, from their perspective, a funny foreign sport. So things get watered down a bit for the kids, pads and safety measures are added, and then the kids grow up, get their black belts, and start teaching a new generation of martial artists, and so forth. I have a feeling that within the next 10-15 years, Muay Thai in the US will undergo a similar change.

                For the most part, it's true what some have said that it doesn't matter what you train, it's how you train. If you took Taijiquan techniques, sped them up and trained them in full-contact sparring, you could probably be a pretty good fighter.

                So the question of what works depends more on whose tutelage you're training under. That said, judo is probably a good choice, as its possible to train realistically even in a mainstream/sports-focused class.

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally posted by bigstu31s View Post
                  So did the likes of Taekwondo ever work?
                  I have used tkd.. but I sparred ALOT! trained like 9 hours each week and maybe 1/3 of that was sparring.. I competed and won some shiny medals and stuff.

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Even someidiot is smarter than smart angel.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by someidiot View Post
                      Where did Tae Kwon Do, mainstream Karate, Aikido, and similar go wrong?

                      Basically, they stopped being about hurting people and started to be about health, sporting, loving the universe, and so forth. In the case of Taijiquan, that happened centuries ago. With Aikido, it was a founding principle of the art in the 1920's.

                      For other styles, I think the late 70's and the 80's had a lot to do with it. Thanks to the influence of Bruce Lee, the ninja craze, TMNT, Daniel-san, etc, karate was breaking out of obscurity and becoming a household word. At that time Karate was trained strictly and sparring was harsh: no or minimal pads with head contact and sweeps allowed, and Chuck Norris won a few championships using Tang Soo Do, a half-brother to TKD, and was acknowledged all-around as a bad-ass.

                      But with popularity inevitably comes kids, and with kids come parents who don't like the idea of their children sustaining recreational concussions in what is, from their perspective, a funny foreign sport. So things get watered down a bit for the kids, pads and safety measures are added, and then the kids grow up, get their black belts, and start teaching a new generation of martial artists, and so forth. I have a feeling that within the next 10-15 years, Muay Thai in the US will undergo a similar change.

                      For the most part, it's true what some have said that it doesn't matter what you train, it's how you train. If you took Taijiquan techniques, sped them up and trained them in full-contact sparring, you could probably be a pretty good fighter.

                      So the question of what works depends more on whose tutelage you're training under. That said, judo is probably a good choice, as its possible to train realistically even in a mainstream/sports-focused class.

                      Some of the above, and BTW, there are combat tai chi schools out there that do compete in kickboxing tourneys, to my knowledge.
                      Originally posted by Nicko1
                      Martial Talk is not neutral, it's just neutered.

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Originally posted by BoonDog View Post
                        Even someidiot is smarter than smart angel.

                        Lol, the oxy-moronic irony is palpable, is it not?
                        Originally posted by Nicko1
                        Martial Talk is not neutral, it's just neutered.

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Muay Thai, BJJ, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling etc. will never decay to the level of strip mall Karate because at the end of the day these arts compete. That competitive element keeps the arts honest.
                          I do not aspire to be great, or even good, I hope to suck a little less then last class.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by ignatzami View Post
                            Muay Thai, BJJ, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling etc. will never decay to the level of strip mall Karate because at the end of the day these arts compete. That competitive element keeps the arts honest.
                            I'm not sure about this. TKD was developed as a sport, as I understand it, and derived from existing karate styles. MT was developed as a sport, as I understand it, and derived from muay boran or whatever it was. TKD does compete, only it competes under TKD rules. What will keep the rules of MT from being gradually altered to be safer and safer until it becomes TKD?

                            I think the difference between MT and Judo or BJJ, in this regard, is that striking arts will be viewed differently from grappling/throwing/locking arts. It's one thing to see your kid thrown or pinned, but another thing to see your kid kneed in the head. But doesn't Judo have techniques which are rarely taught now because they are not allowed in competition?

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by ignatzami View Post
                              Muay Thai, BJJ, Judo, Boxing, Wrestling etc. will never decay to the level of strip mall Karate because at the end of the day these arts compete. That competitive element keeps the arts honest.
                              I call Shenanigans - there are point kickboxing / point karate tourneys for the strip mall Karate schools, and TKD sport tourneys for the 540 jump-kick guys...

                              It's the rules under which competition is held, not the simple fact of competing. The thread about GrapplingX "pankration" tourney comes to mind. Shitty rules = shitty competition = shitty application no matter what style is being practiced.
                              "Never trust a quote you read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln



                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by madrigan View Post
                                I think the difference between MT and Judo or BJJ, in this regard, is that striking arts will be viewed differently from grappling/throwing/locking arts. It's one thing to see your kid thrown or pinned, but another thing to see your kid kneed in the head. But doesn't Judo have techniques which are rarely taught now because they are not allowed in competition?
                                BINGO! There are techniques that they only perform in kata because "they are too dangerous to practice against an opponent". This isn't a quote I made up. It's directly from Best Judo by Isao Inokuma and Nobuyuki Sato from Tokai University.
                                "Never trust a quote you read on the internet" - Abraham Lincoln



                                Comment

                                Collapse

                                Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                                Working...
                                X