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wtf is with this fma titles?!!!

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  • lockfield
    replied
    Originally posted by socratic View Post
    No. Tagalog is a language that has loanwords and content from both local Filippino vernacular languages and Spanish, due to colonial influence. In other words, Tagalog had some of its own stuff, ate some other languages and had Spanish for garnishing.



    Chances are when someone says 'Filippino' or 'Pilippino' (as it's pronounced in Tagalog) they mean 'Tagalog'.

    by the virtue of most of my friends here(almost all are pilipinos) they are taught in school:

    pilipino- a person of the philippines
    pilipina- woman pilipino
    filipina- preferred pronunciation of pilipina, cuz it's more delicate
    pinoy- slang term, just like 'brits' for the british
    pinay- 'pinoy' for ladies
    FILIPINO- their recognized language, derived from dialects such as tagalog, bisaya, illongo, etc. including their native 'gay lingo'. (hey languages evolve right?)
    tagalog- main dialect of central luzon area.

    hopes this helps.

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  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by vile_zoidberg View Post
    I'm confused. You say Filipino is the culture, but this guys says it's the language. Is his grammar retardation seeping into his facts?
    Some people claim to speak American or Mexican instead of English and Spanish, and they're not exactly wrong.

    Leave a comment:


  • Gbemi
    replied
    Originally posted by MrBadGuy View Post
    My instructor demands to be called "The Grand Wizard of Grapplomancy".

    Grapplomancy = the ancient art of knowing the future via fractures in a defeated opponents arm. (srsly)


    "And Kano, the Lord Uchi and the Lord of Mata, forbade his children to act as the heathens do. "

    Leave a comment:


  • socratic
    replied
    Originally posted by vile_zoidberg View Post
    A thank you is in order for both Codos and Socratic.

    Thank you for allowing me a small sip from your fountain of knowledge, so that I may quench my thirst of ignorance.
    It's cool. I had a lecture or two on Tagalog once.

    Leave a comment:


  • vile_zoidberg
    replied
    A thank you is in order for both Codos and Socratic.

    Thank you for allowing me a small sip from your fountain of knowledge, so that I may quench my thirst of ignorance.

    Leave a comment:


  • socratic
    replied
    As a student of Japanese I find it grating the way martialists masturbate over 'sensei', like sensei has some spiritual bond or metaphysical power to it that the word only half-conveys. "I.... AM.... SENSEI!!!!"

    Sensei is a teacher. That's all. I've had many senseis. At school. I'm not going to call you sensei like it's something awesome, 'cause I know plenty of crotchety old ladies who go by the same title, Mr Karate.

    Leave a comment:


  • socratic
    replied
    Originally posted by vile_zoidberg View Post
    ...so Tagalog is like a base language, and Filipino is a dialect?
    No. Tagalog is a language that has loanwords and content from both local Filippino vernacular languages and Spanish, due to colonial influence. In other words, Tagalog had some of its own stuff, ate some other languages and had Spanish for garnishing.

    Originally posted by vile_zoidberg View Post
    I'm confused. You say Filipino is the culture, but this guys says it's the language. Is his grammar retardation seeping into his facts?
    Chances are when someone says 'Filippino' or 'Pilippino' (as it's pronounced in Tagalog) they mean 'Tagalog'.

    Leave a comment:


  • vile_zoidberg
    replied
    Originally posted by lockfield View Post
    so it is appropriate. but not in the day-to-day filipino(that's the language, see the spelling?).
    I'm confused. You say Filipino is the culture, but this guys says it's the language. Is his grammar retardation seeping into his facts?

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    Tagalog is the language, Filipino is the culture.

    Leave a comment:


  • vile_zoidberg
    replied
    ...so Tagalog is like a base language, and Filipino is a dialect?

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    Originally posted by vile_zoidberg View Post
    I thought the language spoken in the Philipines was Tagalog. I have no real experience with FMAs, the region, or the people. Am I missing something?
    That's true for the most part. However, there's lots of Spanish influence. When I hear tagalog spoken I'm able to pick out a lot of Spanish words "profesor", for example.

    Leave a comment:


  • vile_zoidberg
    replied
    I thought the language spoken in the Philipines was Tagalog. I have no real experience with FMAs, the region, or the people. Am I missing something?

    Leave a comment:


  • Da Pope
    replied
    Originally posted by Chili Pepper View Post
    I've never heard of "Tuton" (other than as a member of a particular Germanic tribe), but "Tuhon" is, IIRC, a war-chief.

    LOL yeah sorry my bad typed it in wrong. I meant 'Tuhon'. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Permalost
    replied
    The filipinas I've met with no martial arts background use the term profesor, pronounced the same as in Spanish. I like that.

    Leave a comment:


  • Yoj
    replied
    Originally posted by lockfield View Post
    ha? all of the japanese i've met(usually businessmen and their families) know that kancho is the head honcho,i.e. the company president. maybe you're pronouncing it wrong?

    try budo! go there and say, i'm came here for budo, they'll look at you and say, you like our grapes?:toothy2:
    Yep, i probably was, i was young and was less educated in the language, but i bet i still knew more at that time than said 'kancho' about japanese. At around the same time ther was an ad for a club in a national mag for a club, the kanji according to my japanes g/f read 'bijutsu', the art of painting, kick ass.

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