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Beginning Judo

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    Beginning Judo

    I've just made the choice to take a hiatus from my Japanese Jujitsu club. I'm considering trying Judo for the duration of my 8 week summer. I have found a moderately good club to join up with that is fairly cheap (80 dollars for 8 weeks).

    My only concern is that I'm somewhat in the dark on what to expect from it. I've never done Judo before, nor had any experience with it. What kind of things should i expect physically in terms of demand? What should I do to warm up or to train on the side? Any general tips or suggestions for my first day of class?

    #2
    While any decent school should take care of you no matter what kind of shape you happen to be in, within reason, it would probably help to be in good shape. If you aren't in real crummy shape just go now anyway and work out, because the class will help you get in better shape.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

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      #3
      Originally posted by Snwbrdngpoo View Post
      I've just made the choice to take a hiatus from my Japanese Jujitsu club. I'm considering trying Judo for the duration of my 8 week summer. I have found a moderately good club to join up with that is fairly cheap (80 dollars for 8 weeks).

      My only concern is that I'm somewhat in the dark on what to expect from it. I've never done Judo before, nor had any experience with it. What kind of things should i expect physically in terms of demand? What should I do to warm up or to train on the side? Any general tips or suggestions for my first day of class?
      It varies from club to club, but you can expect practice to be physically demanding. Our warmups last about 30 minutes, including calisthenics (pushups, jumping jacks, etc.) stretching, and tumbling/gymnastics/breakfalls. Newaza lasts about 45 minutes, with about 15 minutes devoted to teaching and drilling a technique, 15 minutes of rolling emphasizing that technique and 15 minutes of free rolling.

      Nage waza works in a pretty similar manner to newaza and lasts about 45 minutes.

      The last half hour of the class varies at each practice, it might be devoted to conditioning, working a particular technique/strategy if a competition is coming up, or at times kata, if belt testing is coming up.

      Expect the unexpected, bring water, eat lightly before class, and since you come from a JJJ background, I think you'll be okay with the traditional Japanese dojo etiquette.

      Rudy Reyes > Bear Grylls

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        #4
        I'm about 190 lbs 5'9. I'm not in horrible shape, but i've certainly been in better shape. I put on about 20 pounds from this past year in college, but last summer i managed to cut down 30lbs or so with a decent diet and jujitsu.

        If classes are MWFSat for 2 hours, should I run on TuThSun or should I just recover on off days?

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          #5
          Running is a good idea as long as it's not too intense. It'll help minimize the muscular soreness you're likely to get from judo.

          Rudy Reyes > Bear Grylls

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            #6
            Mostly it's attitudinal.

            OSU! Or as the Hawaiians put it, "Give 'em!" You try hard and try to avoid injuries. In class some are whipping the jump rope like pros and others are plodding along. It's not like you are going to flunk or get a C-.

            People tell me that they are getting in shape to join a school and I tell them don't do that. It's probably an excuse to avoid working out. But any good school is going to respect the fitness level of the students. People push themselves so far that they barf, but as Juan, the MMA instructor told me, "Just do what my wife does and take a break and do what you can." I've seen bbs in Hawaii and Utah bow out of classes. I've always had "go for it" as a motto, but there is no shame, for me or anyone if you reach your limit. This is real obvious when injured, even for macho shit heads. Anyone, champ or n00b is a fool to stress injuries. So you work out as hard as you can and just back off if it's too much. If you are too tired or doubtful of doing a technique go slow or say something and be quiet at the side of class. -or like in my case last time in Kalihi, I start to say I'm gassed and already Professor has told me no problem, and I'm down and the guy next to me collapses along side of me and we suck air. Then we get up and work out.



            When training for test I was jogging often, split maybe 2/3rds of the time couple miles (twenty minutes or so) and 1/3rds hour long. Hour long is fun around here, you can get out with the red winged black birds. I'd jog a mile before every class to warm up. We didn't spend much time on warmups and calisthenics but sensei thought that warm downs were real important.




            I'd never lift or do long distance on class day.

            Why do tma instructors keep doing jumping jacks? Worthless crap; like bullshido for all types of sports. Universally stupid.
            "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

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