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How long to wait before teaching BJJ?

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    How long to wait before teaching BJJ?

    I've been training in BJJ for about 5 years now and I got my purple belt last year. I still feel that I have a lot to learn but what are your opinions on the best time to start teaching? My instructors are both black belts and I would still be learning from them in the process at the same school. The instructors are not always available though and sometimes need someone to teach morning classes. If I was to do that though I would need to quit my full-time job and teach full time including privates. Do you think purple belt is too early or should you always wait until brown or black belt?

    #2
    Purple belt is currently considered the minimum rank required before you are qualified to teach BJJ.
    Shut the hell up and train.

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      #3
      How much would a purple belt charge as opposed to a brown or black belt? How does one determine what's fair?

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        #4
        If you're talking about regular monthly rate, it would just be the monthly tuition. If you're asking how much a private class would be from a purple belt with limited teaching experience, i'm not sure but I'd probably think around $20 for an hour session considering how black belts charge in excess of $100 for an hour long session.

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          #5
          Tell your black belt instructors that you'd be interested as long as they pay you a salary that's comparable to your current salary. You know you won't be be teaching all the time, but running morning and Saturday classes. When you're not teaching, you'll be running the front desk, answering phones, running the website, etc. The "gym manager" who does all this at my gym is a purple belt.

          Private lessons would be a nice bonus, but I wouldn't count on them to help you pay rent.

          Rudy Reyes > Bear Grylls

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            #6
            I'd say that your instructors are best qualified to let you know when you're able to teach.

            For example, I'm only a Blue Belt under Kurt Pellegrino, but Kurt still trusts my knowledge and teaching ability enough that I'm the instructor for his White Belt classes. There have been times when I've felt a bit awkward teaching at my low rank-- especially when there are Purples and Browns assisting me with the class-- but Kurt has really gotten behind me and has a lot of faith in me.

            On the other hand, I've met guys who are Purple Belts or higher-- and very much deserve to be, by technique and skill-- but make for horrible teachers. Teaching really is an entirely different set of skills from the rest of Jiu-Jitsu, and some guys are much more qualified for it than others.

            So, again, just like your belt rank, I'd say your instructors are the most qualified to tell you when you are ready to teach.

            --Joe

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              #7
              They told me its not just a matter of purple belt or beyond.
              It is said the image of Helio will come to you in a dream or vision, giving you instructions on what to do.

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                #8
                Originally posted by Lebell View Post
                They told me its not just a matter of purple belt or beyond.
                It is said the image of Helio will come to you in a dream or vision, giving you instructions on what to do.
                He told me I have to rape a ninja using my grappling skillz. Only then will I be ready...

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                  #9
                  KFJoe I think pretty much sums it up. If you are teaching under a legit blackbelt, then they should be able to determine who/what you can teach. My coach is working on having an instructor course for some of us to learn how to teach the basics. The goal is to eventually have some of us cover the beginner's classes so that we can open up our schedule. I have been training jits on and off for over 7 years.

                  I know I am more than competant to teach the basics to beginners. I am also the only one in my school doing 10th Planet stuff and I regularly teach people the 10th planet basics during open mats.

                  Sometimes people get promoted based on their competition record. But that does not mean they can teach well. They may have a particular style of jits which others would find very difficult to use.

                  In addition you need to know your own weaknesses. For example, I am NOT the person to come to for guard passing. I am working on it, but it is barely at blue belt level. On the other hand, my half guard is close to if not purple belt level (I have been told this by many people of higher ranks than me) and I have excellent guard retention skills.

                  The point is that if you are going to teach ,make sure you are competant (preferrably proficient in) to teach those techniques and if you are not, make sure you have some sort of lesson plan or cheat notes to help you through it.
                  There is no cheating, there is only jiu-jitsu.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by cyrijl View Post
                    My coach is working on having an instructor course for some of us to learn how to teach the basics. The goal is to eventually have some of us cover the beginner's classes so that we can open up our schedule.
                    This is the way it should work. New students need the basics. All students should review the basics and teaching new students makes for the best review. Sounds like a great coach.

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                      #11
                      Cyrijl, that is an excellent point. Most intermediate level people are competent enough to teach some things. But not everything. That's pretty much what it means to be an intermediate level. You understand the basics, and might be fairly good at certain postions, subs, takedowns, and whatnot, but you still have some holes in your game and room for improvement.

                      Being conscious of this will really help when you are teaching. Don't be afraid to answer a question with "Let's consult with ___ about that, I don't want to steer you wrong." if you get a particularly difficult question about a position/technique that you are weak on. Students will appreciate that you're human and not trying to B.S. them.

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                        #12
                        a purple belt teaches at my school, three out of five days a week, he trains at his main gym the rest of the time, and has a black belt come an teach the other two days, he also has made some plans on bring in some outside black belts for seminars.

                        I donno, I think he's got one stripe, but he teaches beginner BJJ which is what you should probably teach.

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                          #13
                          I have learned so much already from the purple belts that coach me, and that I have rolled with. The ones I know in person are very humble, yet very knowledgeable.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by beardedtaco View Post
                            I have learned so much already from the purple belts that coach me, and that I have rolled with. The ones I know in person are very humble, yet very knowledgeable.
                            Like Stifus are supposed to be?

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                              #15
                              Don't get too worried about it. If your instructor wants you to teach, odds are he thinks you know something. Some of the first people I trained under were blue belts at a university club. They knew a lot more than me and taught me plenty. Granted, they were very talented blue belts, but blue belts none the less.

                              Someone pretty much already said it here, but just do the best you can. If you're not comfortable answering a certain question or can't figure out why someone can't make a move work, say so. Tell them you'll ask someone else and get back to them. You'll probably learn something in the process.

                              If the environment is right and the person having a problem won't think you're just being a dick, you can even ask them to demonstrate for the class and ask the other students what they think is going wrong. Just because people are beginners doesn't necessarily mean they won't have any insight. I've met some people who were analytical or talented enough to whom grappling just makes sense. They could often spot problems pretty quickly despite having relatively little experience. It's also a good way to get people thinking about what are the nuts and bolts that make techniques work as well as how they can counter things by taking one or more of those nuts and bolts out.

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