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    #76
    Originally posted by Sley View Post
    I do BJJ

    Their is a Position Called North South, it is also known as the 69

    If some one does not use Deodorant you smell it, on no GI Days you are covered in other peoples sweat. But it is worth it. (also I swear 5 days of BJJ a week causes cramps)
    there is a reason that it's hard to find chics in BJJ or other grappling arts

    it makes me sad...

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      #77
      Originally posted by kenpostudent View Post
      Muay Thai is a great art and I have the utmost respect for it. One thing I have never understood, though, is why do Thai fighters pull their arms back when they throw a roundhouse kick? To me, it would seem like that would limit your power because you are forcing your body to move in two directions at once. It seems unnatural. Am I wrong?
      Iflack of power in their round kicks is really a weakness they need to worry about?
      [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
      [ self defence: general thoughts | anecdote is anecdotes, not data

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        #78
        Originally posted by kenpostudent View Post
        Muay Thai is a great art and I have the utmost respect for it. One thing I have never understood, though, is why do Thai fighters pull their arms back when they throw a roundhouse kick? To me, it would seem like that would limit your power because you are forcing your body to move in two directions at once. It seems unnatural. Am I wrong?
        Speaking not as a Muay Thai practitioner but a karate/kickboxing standpoint, it helps counterbalance you. You can get a lot more 'twist' into the kick if you drop your kicking-side arm. It's not very intuitive until you try it, you can definitely feel the difference.

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          #79
          Originally posted by Breakfast Fox View Post
          Speaking not as a Muay Thai practitioner but a karate/kickboxing standpoint, it helps counterbalance you. You can get a lot more 'twist' into the kick if you drop your kicking-side arm. It's not very intuitive until you try it, you can definitely feel the difference.
          Does the dropping of the hand telegraph the kick? That is something I would look for to get a cue of when someone was going to throw a kick. I would think that would give an opponent something to time off of.

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            #80
            Originally posted by kenpostudent View Post
            Does the dropping of the hand telegraph the kick? That is something I would look for to get a cue of when someone was going to throw a kick. I would think that would give an opponent something to time off of.
            then the kick comes.

            Anyway, you lower the hand as you are kicking, not before the kick begins.
            [ petterhaggholm.net | blog | essays ]
            [ self defence: general thoughts | anecdote is anecdotes, not data

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              #81
              As others have said, that rear hand drops as one kicks, the front hand stays in gaurd. Round kicks in MT kick through an opponent, requiring you to throw your hip over as you kick-- so we drop that rear hand to balance ourselves. I don't really feel myself moving in the direction of my hand, I just put it out there...

              A self-proclaimed TKD guy was watching our class about two years ago, and as I was leaving he pulled me aside and warned me that by putting my rear hand back, I was exposing that arm to an "elephant grab"... He failed to tell me how someone would walk through my kick, get past my gaurd, and reach around behind me for my arm...

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                #82
                Originally posted by Ike View Post
                As others have said, that rear hand drops as one kicks, the front hand stays in gaurd. Round kicks in MT kick through an opponent, requiring you to throw your hip over as you kick-- so we drop that rear hand to balance ourselves. I don't really feel myself moving in the direction of my hand, I just put it out there...

                A self-proclaimed TKD guy was watching our class about two years ago, and as I was leaving he pulled me aside and warned me that by putting my rear hand back, I was exposing that arm to an "elephant grab"... He failed to tell me how someone would walk through my kick, get past my gaurd, and reach around behind me for my arm...
                Unless he was talking about somone on your flank or behind you as you kick, I can't imagine what he was referring to either. My thought was that there are always only two ways to defeat a circular attack: move straight into it or move out of the arc of the circle. So, if I see someone drop their hands when they throw a roundhouse kick, I'll move into the kick with a punch. Since MT fighters are not regularly getting knocked out by TMAers, I'm sure they have found a way to make it work.

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                  #83
                  I wouldn't move into a rear thai kick, and trying to stay outside of the kick doesn't ensure your safety from a follow up switch-kick-- but you do have a few options:

                  1) Teep or Foot Jab: The Thai front kick is more like the motion of kicking down a door than a tradional MA front kick-- one raises his knee so as to chamber the kick and pushes out as the kick lands (I've been taught to land the kick before fully extending, but I've seen other fully extend as it landed). Anyway, throw a long foot jab at your opponent's mid-section as they are kicking.

                  2) Cutting Kick: Imagine he is throwing a rear thai at you from his right leg. As it is coming in, you step out forward and to the side with your right foot (effectively switching leads, as found in Kali/FMA footwork) and throw a low, cutting, thai style kick from your left at his left leg. Stay out of his punching range.

                  3) Leg Shield Counter: If he is kicking for your front leg, raise it, bending at the knee (with the knee pointing at 45 degrees or so), as you would a leg shield, but as his kick connects with your shin, lean into it and flick your leg so as to push his leg out to his right (your left), off-balancing him for just a second. Follow up with a cutting kick, or put that left foot down and launch a rear thai of your own, or (my favorite), move in for a cross or a hook to the clinch.

                  I'm sure there are other options.
                  Last edited by Ike; 5/29/2009 12:13pm, .

                  Comment


                    #84
                    Originally posted by Ike View Post
                    I wouldn't move into a rear thai kick, and trying to stay outside of the kick doesn't ensure your safety from a follow up switch-kick-- but you do have a few options:

                    1) Teep or Foot Jab: The Thai front kick is more like the motion of kicking down a door than a tradional MA front kick-- one raises his knee so as to chamber the kick and pushes out as the kick lands (I've been taught to land the kick before fully extending, but I've seen other fully extend as it landed). Anyway, throw a long foot jab at your opponent's mid-section as they are kicking.

                    2) Cutting Kick: Imagine he is throwing a rear thai at you from his right leg. As it is coming in, you step out forward and to the side with your right foot (effectively switching leads, as found in Kali/FMA footwork) and throw a low, cutting, thai style kick from your left at his left leg. Stay out of his punching range.

                    3) Leg Shield Counter: If he is kicking for your front leg, raise it, bending at the knee (with the knee pointing at 45 degrees or so), as you would a leg shield, but as his kick connects with your shin, lean into it and flick your leg so as to push his leg out to his right (your left), off-balancing him for just a second. Follow up with a cutting kick, or put that left foot down and launch a rear thai of your own, or (my favorite), move in for a cross or a hook to the clinch.

                    I'm sure there are other options.
                    What you describe in 1) is what I would call a front thrust kick. In 2), I would call that a leg check or block. As for 3), that sounds like it would hurt... but it's probably a last resort option. I'm not a fan of eating a kick that I can avoid.

                    Comment


                      #85
                      1) The body mechanics of a teep are different than a TMA thrust kick-- in a teep, you land the ball of the foot on the target and push it back.

                      2) I'm not sure how you got a block from that... You are literally stepping out and throwing a kick of your own at the opponent's lead leg.

                      3) You'll find out very quickly that you're going to have to either develop thighs and/or ribs of steel or learn how to block a kick. Trust me, "eating" the kick and blocking are two entirely different sensations.

                      But hey, you can always use a knee destruction and point your knee at his shin or foot as the kick comes in. Takes practice, however, and it's never a sure thing.
                      Last edited by Ike; 5/29/2009 12:30pm, .

                      Comment


                        #86
                        Originally posted by Ike View Post
                        1) The body mechanics of a teep are different than a TMA thrust kick-- in a teep, you land the ball of the foot on the target and push it back.

                        2) I'm not sure how you got a block from that... You are literally stepping out and throwing a kick of your own at the opponent's lead leg.

                        3) You'll find out very quickly that you're going to have to either develop thighs and/or ribs of steel or learn how to block a kick. Trust me, "eating" the kick and blocking are two entirely different sensations.

                        But hey, you can always use a knee destruction and point your knee at his shin or foot as the kick comes in. Takes practice, however, and it's never a sure thing.
                        I have been the recipient of a knee destruction... it fucking hurt like a motherfucker.

                        2) I get the picture... I think we just use different terminology. I might have to see it, though, to get a better idea.

                        How do you condition the legs for those type of blocks/ kicks?

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                          #87
                          Um, practice?

                          Practice kicking heavy bags, practice blocking those kicks. Wear shin guards at first. You'll get better, eventually, but like I said, you are at least diffusing the kick/catching it before his hip turns over rather than taking the full force of that kick on your thigh or side of your knee. Sharp shins will hurt you every now and then, but you'll get over it.

                          Comment


                            #88
                            Originally posted by Ike View Post
                            Um, practice?

                            Practice kicking heavy bags, practice blocking those kicks. Wear shin guards at first. You'll get better, eventually, but like I said, you are at least diffusing the kick/catching it before his hip turns over rather than taking the full force of that kick on your thigh or side of your knee. Sharp shins will hurt you every now and then, but you'll get over it.
                            Any truth to the rumors that all the stuff gives you arthritis in your old age or is that bullshido excuses from TMA guys?

                            Comment


                              #89
                              I've heard that only from non-MT guys. I'm not a doctor, nor have I been practicing MT long enough to develop a noticeable problem. As with any training, stretch well, know your limits, and treat injuries properly. Good body mechanics reduces the likelihood of getting hurt.

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