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Hello, from Portugal. Byakuren?

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  • Kagite
    replied
    Hello, is there actually anyone out there still practicing this style out of Japan?

    Leave a comment:


  • Kagite
    replied
    Hi! Is there actually anyone still practicing this Karate style somewhere out of Japan? It seems all the international websites are down.

    Leave a comment:


  • fmpereiradasilv
    replied
    Kyokushin-Kan Portugal, Byakuren Kaikan Portugal, Shinkyokushin Portugal and Daido-Juku Portugal have joined in Portugal founding the Jissen Karate Union. Since in Portugal, every karate style has a small number of students, that was the best way to have a resonable number.

    There some sort of seminars from time to time; competition, Portugal wise occurs between these four schools.

    I'm still more inclined to continue byakuren and maybe someday jump off to judo or hiu jitsu. Is this reasonable or does it make little sense?

    Leave a comment:


  • kolsyrade
    replied
    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    Those are good points.

    You know another MA that overcomes those drawbacks effectively, without stepping up to the classical MuayThai+BJJ MMA?
    What I mean is what is the single most complete Martial Art.
    There are plenty of good styles, but if you look for something kyokushin related that covers those 2 flaws specifically:

    Daido juku. Good luck finding that in the US.
    basically kyokushin+judo
    YouTube - Daido juku MMA karate knockdown

    YouTube - Daido juku kudo 2004 hokutoki Tournament

    Then you got Nippon Zendokai (not to be confused with the australian style with the same name). A offshoot from daido juku, and very active in MMA in japan. But there is basically no zendokai anywhere outside of japan


    They use small gloves and head protectors. Allow basically anything from headbutts to grappling (and, in the case of daido juku, punches/kicks to the groin).
    They may not be all that flashy since they go to ground grappling a lot (and its all amateur, their pros fight in MMA), but it is good stuff and very complete.
    And unlike MMA its fighting wearing clothes (how many street fights have you heard of where the fighter wears only shorts and no shirt -that may happen in sunnier climates, but not where I live).

    There are several other similar styles all over the world.Like Tsu shin gen (ashihara karate +judo) kyokushin budokai (kyokushin +judo) but they tend to be small and not work well with each other.
    None of them are popular in the US, though.

    The Kyokushin-kan organization (a mid sized kyokushin faction) has started holding shinken shoby events. Knockdown with gloves that allows clinch, throws, punch&elbow strikes to the head and that apparently will start allowing limited grappling soon aswell.

    YouTube - Kyokushin-kan karate shinken shobu kumite (knockdown tournament with face punches)

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  • fmpereiradasilv
    replied
    Originally posted by kolsyrade View Post
    The two largest drawbacks of byakuren for self defense is the same as kyokushin.
    1. Head punches are only done as formal training, and the no-headpunching rule in competition and daily sparring may result in bad habits.
    2. No grappling training to speak of.
    Those are good points.

    You know another MA that overcomes those drawbacks effectively, without stepping up to the classical MuayThai+BJJ MMA?
    What I mean is what is the single most complete Martial Art.

    Not that I'm thinking of backing down now from byakuren, the training lived very well up to my expectations, I just think that it's important to know your own flaws and adapt to them.

    Leave a comment:


  • fmpereiradasilv
    replied
    thanks Kolsyrade, great post. ;)

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  • kolsyrade
    replied
    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    Hell0

    I'm from Portugal, 21 years old.
    I've a background in Goju-ryu, but I dropped out too soon. Now I'm going to start again from scratch but I was thinking of a fullcontact style.

    From what I know, byakuren is recent style of karate (kempo still is a form of karate, am I right?).
    Where I live there are not many types of dojos, but there is small one (teaches byakuren) which took part in the 2008 world cup, taking second place.
    Byakuren is a offshot from Nippon Shorinji kempo -which is a japanese attempt to recreate shaolin kungfu from around the end of WW2.
    The founder of Byakuren was a top profile in shorinji kempo who decided that he wanted to test himself in competition, so in the 70ies, he entered kyokushin tournaments.
    He then left shorinji kempo and formed Byakuren karate, wich is based on the theory from Shorinji kempo but with seriously kyokushin influenced techniques.

    Byakuren competes with straight oldschool kyokushin knockdown rules, and have a friendly cooperation with shin-kyokushin 7the second largest kyokushin faction). It is not uncommon to see Byakuren fighters in japanese shin-kyokushin tournaments. A few years ago a byakuren fighter even won the shin-kyokushin all japan open (the most prestigious kyokushin tournament in japan, except for the world tournament).

    YouTube - Byakuren karate world tournament 2004

    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    I would like to ask you what can I expect from Byakuren, I mean,
    do they use kyokushin rules (no blows to head or joints)?
    Yes. they use thee exact same competition rules as kyokushin.

    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    Have you seen many injuries in training from your experience?
    Its full contact. Expect the occasional knockout, knee problem and rare broken rib & busted knuckle.
    If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.

    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    Are there many enshin or kyokushin similarities (heard some stuff about that)?
    Not sure what you mean here. Are there many styles like Byakuren, enshin and kyokushin? Yes. Other styles of note are Shidokan, seiwakai, world Oyama, Seidokaikan, and ashihara. There are too many to list, but those are the largest ones.
    Is Byakuren similar to kyokushin and enshin? yes. They are very similar.

    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    How physically demanding is it?
    Expect a lot of hard training.

    Originally posted by fmpereiradasilv View Post
    Is it useful as self defense, and if so, whats it's main flaw?
    The two largest drawbacks of byakuren for self defense is the same as kyokushin.
    1. Head punches are only done as formal training, and the no-headpunching rule in competition and daily sparring may result in bad habits.
    2. No grappling training to speak of.

    Leave a comment:


  • Whosthemaster
    replied
    Bem-vindo ao Bullshido, Pereira!

    Leave a comment:


  • M.C.
    replied
    Good luck with the training... :)
    And I will see if I can convince myself to start reading in portuguese, I should while I am here, I guess.

    Leave a comment:


  • fmpereiradasilv
    replied
    @JSpeedy Jogo Do Pau. To tell you the truth, it's even more difficult to find somewhere to learn that, and I'll break it down in a couple of secs: It has it's origins in the mountains (shephards) used during the Napoleon war 'cause a stick was very versatile. It's a rather marginal martial art nowadays and will soon extinct :(


    @ MC. Even as your 4th language, I got your point with no effort. Writing portuguese is a lot more difficult than talking, my advice is try reading portuguese books, the language gets under your skin without you even knowing.

    Jiujitsu is a style I like a lot, but it's a bit more difficult to synchronize the timing with my college classes.

    Yesterday I made a Tryout for byakuren, and i liked it. It's really similar to kyokushin, at least the kihon, sparring uses kyokushin rules, and it's less dangerous than playing football.

    Anyway, i think I'll keep going with byakuren. Looks just crazy enough withou being stupid.

    Leave a comment:


  • M.C.
    replied
    Bon dia, como vai o senore? Muinto prazere.
    Porque voce noa trainero jiujitsu? Eu sai voce tain mais bon scholas de jiu jitsu do portugal...
    well excuse my horrible portugese, I work on it as my 4th language and I guess it shows.

    For your questions, I am not familiar with that style but I gues that it will be physical demanding in the first place, like all types of exercise, until your body gets used to. For injuries, well there are always ways to hurt yourself.
    My best advice, go there, observe a lesson, take an intro class, ask as many questions (you already have a few good ones right there) and see if you like it, if so train their, if not report back and ask for further adivce.

    PS: Welcome to Bullshido

    Leave a comment:


  • jspeedy
    replied
    WHat about Jogo Do Pau (Portugese stickfighting from what I understand)? Looks cool enough.
    Kinda of heavy on the pads while sparring though. BUt i've never tried it.
    YouTube - Portuguese Stickfighting JOGO DO PAU
    Have you at least heard of it?

    Leave a comment:


  • fmpereiradasilv
    replied
    Well, I'm honered... but can't say I'm happy about that.
    The country is small and there aren't that many martial arts students.

    Martial arts are still very underrated, at least here. Hopefully that will change in years to come.
    It's like someone posted (dunno who): the more brutal the country's history, the better the martial arts and we are classicaly the peaceful country.

    Any way, there is no doubt for me that one can gain a lot from learning to fight, without being a brawler.

    IMO if one wants to learn some kind of MA, at least let it have a taste of the real deal, that's why I chose a fullcontact/knockdown karate style.

    Leave a comment:


  • Phrost
    replied
    Welcome. To my knowledge you're the first member from Portugal to post an introduction.

    Leave a comment:


  • fmpereiradasilv
    started a topic Hello, from Portugal. Byakuren?

    Hello, from Portugal. Byakuren?

    Hell0

    I'm from Portugal, 21 years old.
    I've a background in Goju-ryu, but I dropped out too soon. Now I'm going to start again from scratch but I was thinking of a fullcontact style.

    From what I know, byakuren is recent style of karate (kempo still is a form of karate, am I right?).
    Where I live there are not many types of dojos, but there is small one (teaches byakuren) which took part in the 2008 world cup, taking second place.

    I would like to ask you what can I expect from Byakuren, I mean,
    do they use kyokushin rules (no blows to head or joints)?

    Have you seen many injuries in training from your experience?

    Are there many enshin or kyokushin similarities (heard some stuff about that)?

    How physically demanding is it?

    Is it useful as self defense, and if so, whats it's main flaw?

    TNKS
    Last edited by fmpereiradasilv; 5/06/2009 9:44am, .

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