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complimentry style to Wing Chun and training in more than one style.

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    complimentry style to Wing Chun and training in more than one style.

    I was just wondering what you guys think a complimentary style to wing chun would be? Possibly something with higher kicks due to their not really being in WC or would this back fire due to WC needing to get in close anyway?

    Also what are your views on training more than one style simultaneously? Is it better to choose a style and perfect it?(well get as close as possible since you can always improve) or can you train more than one at the same time or must you reach a certain level of proficiency in one style before you attempt to take on something else at the same time?

    Your opinions would be much appreciated.

    #2
    Srch Funkshun NOOB!

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      #3
      C'mon Frank, give my guy a break. I've got him this far by carefully nurturing him under a halogen lamp and gluing feathers onto his tiny, pimply wings. He at least deserves an answer.

      So here it is: give up the chun completely and take two classes a week of judo and one of boxing while also supplementing it with Crossfit.

      A year of that and you'll be able to murder 90% of chunners; two years of diligent study and you'll be totally fucking hard.

      Now fly, stuartdaly, fly!

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        #4
        Originally posted by BaronVonDingDong View Post
        A year of that and you'll be able to murder 90% of chunners; two years of diligent study and you'll be totally fucking hard.

        Now fly, stuartdaly, fly!
        I wounder if playing hockey makes you better at fighting then Chunner, at least they spare everyday.

        Take BJJ sometimes you get to roll around with middle aged men.

        Seriously Take BJJ its very fun. Keep the Chun if you like it just take a BJJ class

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          #5
          Ha ha lol thanks Baron, I started wing chun cauze I thought its a good intro to Chinese martial arts maybe one of the harder Japanese styles would be good also but the softer styles have merit too yin and yang.

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            #6
            If you want philosophy, go study philosophy, if you want martial arts go find a place to learn to fight. Yin and Yang is philosophy.

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              #7
              but many eastern MAs go hand in hand with philosophy what I am saying is that both the hard and soft styles are good

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                #8
                if you want soft style, train in judo that translates as 'the gentle way', it is soft because you are trying to use your opponents force against them, the key difference is that you end up throwing them on their head, which is quite useful.

                if you live close to russians ask for Boevoy Sambo and the 2 minutes in heaven drill, its similar to judo in being the gentle* way.













                *standards of gentleness may vary

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by honest_truth View Post
                  if you want soft style, train in judo that translates as 'the gentle way', it is soft because you are trying to use your opponents force against them
                  Judo - only usually gentle for 2 kinds of people...

                  1) the people not getting thrown.

                  2) the people who are performing the lock/hold and not the people who are being held/locked.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by stuartdaly View Post
                    but many eastern MAs go hand in hand with philosophy what I am saying is that both the hard and soft styles are good
                    Many martial arts instructors like to try to blend "philosophy" with what they're teaching. Actual philosophy involves reading long books by people with names like Kant and Kierkegaard. Martial arts "philosophy" tends to involve fortune cookie sayings and meaningless buzz words like "soft" and "hard" and "energy" (poor energy, a word with an actual scientific meaning, so mercilessly abused).

                    Dividing arts by "philosophy" and "soft" or "hard" isn't a helpful exercise. It's just grasping at mist. Real, useful martial arts don't have "philosophies", they have good systems of technique that can be used in established game plans. No mysticism or asian aphorisms required.

                    When a school or art focuses instead on these more ephemeral philosophies, it's a dead give away that they just don't know anything about real training or fighitng. Wing Chun is one of the worst offenders in this regard: they'll go on and on about how Wing Chun has 5 principles, and is scientifically and structurally perfect. Get a Wing Chun person started and they'll gush on about how they train to fight with maximum efficiency, and to "never fight force with force." Thing is, no one who does any art worth knowing "fights force with force" or does things in anything but the most efficient way they know how. The slogans don't add anything, and repeating them mindlessly can only distract you from seeing if you're actually training well.

                    The consensus on this board is basically that wing chun is not a good use of someone's time who is interested in learning to fight. There are quite a few reasons for this, but the one sentence summary is that live sparring and athletic training to test good technique and develop real skills is the way to go, which is the opposite of what wing chun does.

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                      #11

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                        #12
                        A view from a noob training in multiple styles: there are a advantages and disadvantages to training multiple arts. Let me illustrate this by mentioning my sparring sessions with my best friend and his little brother: my best friend is small, so he does Jujitsu. His little brother, who is actually taller and a bit more muscular than him, does Muay Thai. Whenever I box or kickbox spar against his little brother I lose, and whenever I grapple with him I lose. They specialize in their arts. But whenever we do full MMA sparring, I usually do very well because I know a little bit of everything and am able to use whatever move is appropriate at the time. When going against my friend I try to keep things standing up, and since he doesn't have much of a standing up game I usually win, and when I take on his little brother I always try to throw him because he doesn't know how to work with that. Basically, by cross training you lose the ability to keep up with a boxer in boxing, a Judoka or wrestler in take downs, a BJJ person in ground fighting, etc. But you do gain a very useful foundation where you are at least proficient in different ways of fighting.

                        This is especially important if you're training for self-defense. Cross-training is one of the best things you can do to protect yourself. If I'm attacked by a guy bigger than me, I'm using a Silat takedown. If I'm attacked by a group, I'll combine my Muay Thai usage of many parts of my body and my Kali training of using anything around me as a weapon. If I'm attacked by someone with a weapon I'm using my Kali training to fight them with whatever I can find or my Silat training to disarm their knife. Of course, I'm still a noob now (maybe 4 or 5 months in), so this is just hypothetical, as right now I would probably get my ass handed to me.

                        Anyways, I digress. My Sifu tells us he always gets asked "if someone attacked you, what would you do?" His response is always "I can't answer that questions, because its not specific enough. It depends on the situation, it can be different everytime." Basically, if there were a certain way to respond to any attack, whether from an opponent in the ring or an attacker on the street, then everyone would only be taking that art, but unfortunately thats not the case.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by karma2343 View Post
                          A view from a noob training in multiple styles: there are a advantages and disadvantages to training multiple arts. Let me illustrate this by mentioning my sparring sessions with my best friend and his little brother: my best friend is small, so he does Jujitsu. His little brother, who is actually taller and a bit more muscular than him, does Muay Thai. Whenever I box or kickbox spar against his little brother I lose, and whenever I grapple with him I lose. They specialize in their arts. But whenever we do full MMA sparring, I usually do very well because I know a little bit of everything and am able to use whatever move is appropriate at the time. When going against my friend I try to keep things standing up, and since he doesn't have much of a standing up game I usually win, and when I take on his little brother I always try to throw him because he doesn't know how to work with that. Basically, by cross training you lose the ability to keep up with a boxer in boxing, a Judoka or wrestler in take downs, a BJJ person in ground fighting, etc. But you do gain a very useful foundation where you are at least proficient in different ways of fighting.

                          This is especially important if you're training for self-defense. Cross-training is one of the best things you can do to protect yourself. If I'm attacked by a guy bigger than me, I'm using a Silat takedown. If I'm attacked by a group, I'll combine my Muay Thai usage of many parts of my body and my Kali training of using anything around me as a weapon. If I'm attacked by someone with a weapon I'm using my Kali training to fight them with whatever I can find or my Silat training to disarm their knife. Of course, I'm still a noob now (maybe 4 or 5 months in), so this is just hypothetical, as right now I would probably get my ass handed to me.

                          Anyways, I digress. My Sifu tells us he always gets asked "if someone attacked you, what would you do?" His response is always "I can't answer that questions, because its not specific enough. It depends on the situation, it can be different everytime." Basically, if there were a certain way to respond to any attack, whether from an opponent in the ring or an attacker on the street, then everyone would only be taking that art, but unfortunately thats not the case.
                          So you invision a jack of all styles master of ass kicking:)

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                            #14
                            Yessir, minus the master part =) The one disadvantage of it is time, however. If I had been at a Muay Thai only gym instead then I would be punching/kicking/kneeing/elbowing much harder and faster than I can now, but I wouldn't know how to throw or takedown, use weapon disarms, etc. It will take me a couple years to be as skilled in Muay Thai as someone who exclusively does Muay Thai, but in a fight I can weigh my strengths over theirs, having been trained in multiple styles, and throw them to the ground, something they won't be prepared for since their sparring consists of only being hit and not being thrown.

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                              #15
                              Do Judo. It's cheap and widely available.
                              Soon-to-be BJJ sandbagger?

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