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As little power as possible

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    As little power as possible

    At least in aikido and ninjutsu, it's common to hear not to use too much force. Dodge instead of block, move away instead of block, don't be there, et cetera, et cetera. I'm sure y'all have heard it too.

    Now, I haven't trained any full contact striking/kicking sport (yet?), which is why I ask this: Is there any such full contact striking/kicking sport which DOESN'T advocate dodging/moving instead of blocking, if possible, or even encourages blocking instead of moving?

    I can guess some answers, but I'd like to hear them first. Fire away.

    #2
    Originally posted by TheBigSwede View Post
    At least in aikido and ninjutsu, it's common to hear not to use too much force. Dodge instead of block, move away instead of block, don't be there, et cetera, et cetera. I'm sure y'all have heard it too.

    Now, I haven't trained any full contact striking/kicking sport (yet?), which is why I ask this: Is there any such full contact striking/kicking sport which DOESN'T advocate dodging/moving instead of blocking, if possible, or even encourages blocking instead of moving?

    I can guess some answers, but I'd like to hear them first. Fire away.
    The initial head- or shoulder-first charge in Sumo, called the Tachi-ai. To dodge, instead of going head-on force-against-force, is called "Tachi-ai Henka" and is considered the mark of a coward. What happens afterwards is more typical of combat-sports in terms of positioning for advantage...but don't ever duck or sidestep on that very first charge.

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      #3
      If Aikido and Ninjutsu both agree on anything that makes it good enough for me.

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        #4
        according to jean claud van damme thai boxers dont move or block.. theyre so damn tough they take it all!
        "The hero and the coward both feel the same thing, but the hero projects his fear onto his opponent while the coward runs. 'Fear'. It's the same thing, but it's what you do with it that matters". - Cus D'Amato
        Spoiler:

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          #5
          Originally posted by Vorpal View Post
          If Aikido and Ninjutsu both agree on anything that makes it good enough for me.
          I'm going to need the Chun opinion before I commit to anything.

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            #6
            Originally posted by cuatro76 View Post
            I'm going to need the Chun opinion before I commit to anything.
            I bow to your superior wisdom.

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              #7
              Originally posted by cuatro76 View Post
              I'm going to need the Chun opinion before I commit to anything.
              hmm.. I have never trained chun but I attended a chunner show once and I think the sifu said something to the effect as moving out of the way:P

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                #8
                As a former Chunion let me respond.
                The ChunWay (or Tao of Gary Busey) is that one does not need to exert 'force' per se, as most of your damage will be done via your PowerAngles (seriously), being the structural alignment of your body. With the right angle of the body's limbs, feet, and rotation, relative to the direction one has sent one's foe in, you will certainly cave their heads in.

                One mustn't stiffen up or use heavy strikes, because these slow one down, and result in leaving openings for counterattack.
                Originally posted by Judoka_UK
                Judo is the PC to Sambo's Mac.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by 100xobm View Post
                  As a former Chunion let me respond.
                  The ChunWay (or Tao of Gary Busey) is that one does not need to exert 'force' per se, as most of your damage will be done via your PowerAngles (seriously), being the structural alignment of your body. With the right angle of the body's limbs, feet, and rotation, relative to the direction one has sent one's foe in, you will certainly cave their heads in.

                  One mustn't stiffen up or use heavy strikes, because these slow one down, and result in leaving openings for counterattack.
                  You forgot the special 'chun gun' punch, where you do a hand stand, spin onto your feet (continue spinning a couple times), and finally launch a punch (with the power originating from the toes) while screaming random words in Swahili to cultivate your qi and improve your body angle. While doing this it is important not to tense your hands (you wouldn't want your punch to lose speed after all, because then it might be inefficient) and to be wearing an orange shirt at the time of the punch.

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                    #10
                    I hear not getting hit by an attack is a pretty awesome way to not get hurt.
                    Lord Krishna said: I am terrible time the destroyer of all beings in all worlds, engaged to destroy all beings in this world; Of those heroic soldiers presently situated in the opposing army, even without you none will be spared.
                    Bhagavad Gita 11:32

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                      #11
                      nobody mentionned kyokushin yet?
                      its almost sadistical.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Lebell View Post
                        nobody mentionned kyokushin yet?
                        its almost sadistical.
                        What's the "almost" for?

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by davidovitch View Post
                          What's the "almost" for?
                          LOL! you are right.
                          It IS sadistical!
                          I did kk when i was 10 til my 14th.
                          Got ko-ed in my first year, my momz (zomg!) always tried to make me quit when she saw the bruises on my body and my unfleshed knuckles, but i loved doing it.
                          We had a mildly sociopathic teacher but thanks to him i learned to have some backbone and fighting spirit.

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                            #14
                            Mirrors my experience, including family making me want to quit. In retrospect, maybe I could have learnt the same life lessons if I'd asked a friend to beat me black and blue with a stick twice a week instead of paying money to have a guy in a white pyjamas do the same thing.

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                              #15
                              Never heard of an MA that doesn't advocate moving, though there are some that would advocate being far more overtly evasive than than others. There's a kid at our gym, for example who has the most phenomenal sense of range. In the middle of the ring, you just can't hit him even when you're toe to toe. He's always moving though his chin is never more than half an inch or so away from your fully-extended punch. It's brilliant. Before he joined the army, he had a couple of pro fights. He's a genuine switch fighter, too.

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