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    judo grading

    i've just started judo, and straight away noticed how much they rely on the japanese words. and was wondering whiether you had to know the japanese words to pass a grading?

    #2
    no. but it helps to know the throws
    In summation your argument denotes a lack of intellectual honesty on your part. It is my contention that this matter would best be solved with fisticuffs. I believe I will be victorious in this regard.

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      #3
      They won't refer to the throws in English, so if they have a formal grading (instead of just handing you a belt, which may happen--especially for lower ranks) and call techniques out verbally or from a list, you'll need to match the throw, pin, choke, or lock to its Japanese name.

      That's not really your major concern right now; just keep your head down and the Japanese you'll need to know will solve itself. When I started karate I thought the most important thing was knowing how to count correctly...turns out nobody cares until a month or two has passed and you know it anyway.
      What a disgrace it is for a man to grow old without ever seeing the beauty and strength of which his body is capable. -Xenophon's Socrates

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        #4
        Yes, you will have to know the japaneese terms for techniques and referee command
        "Out of every hundred men, ten shouldn't even be there, eighty are just targets, nine are the real fighters, and we are lucky to have them, for they make the battle. Ah, but the one, one is a warrior, and he will bring the others back." -- Hericletus, circa 500 BC

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          #5
          While i'm generally anti-japanophile, I like the argument that you can tell a judoka from russia that you have a good "kata guruma" and they'll know what you're talking about.

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            #6
            plus, if you travel, it's good that everyone knows the same words for start and stop.

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              #7
              yeah, just don't worry about it. Eventually you hear the name so often that it becomes a part of your vocabulary just like any other English word.
              "The pedant is he who finds it impossible to read criticism of himself without immediately reaching for his pen and replying to the effect that the accusation is a gross insult to his person. He is, in effect, a man unable to laugh at himself."Sigmund Freud, The Ego and the Id.

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                #8
                thx for all the replys. and i'll keep all the info inmind.

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