Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Martial Arts Teachers

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Martial Arts Teachers

    Well, that was interesting.

    I just finished a book bought on EBay called "Martial Arts Teachers On Teaching"

    If you have a couple of hours, find a copy and have a read. It's . . . interesting.

    Regards,

    #2
    What's it about? Can you give us a jist, or quote, or some other reason to stop downloading porn long enough to pick up a book?

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Razamataz
      What's it about? Can you give us a jist, or quote, or some other reason to stop downloading porn long enough to pick up a book?
      Huh? Who says you have to do one or the other? That's what scripts and 'bots are for.

      It's a book where 26 martial arts teachers of different styles discuss their thoughts, challenges, techniques and observations about teaching martial arts. Everything from aikido (sorry, Mr Phrost) being taught to special interest groups to hard-style striking and takedowns being taught to military and law enforcement.

      I can save some time by adding that it's all TMA. It was written before MMA was popular and before BJJ was known north of the equator.

      Here's a more lengthy precis' for you:

      Martial Arts Teachers on Teaching: Amazon.co.uk: Carol Wiley: Books

      Comment


        #4
        Edit: nevermind my question, as you're 2nd post answered it.

        Do you think there's a real difference between teaching a TMA and teaching something like BJJ? I don't mean the techniques that are being taught, I mean the method of teaching itself.
        Last edited by Captain Spaulding; 6/14/2008 5:49pm, .

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Captain Spaulding
          Edit: nevermind my question, as you're 2nd post answered it.

          Do you think there's a real difference between teaching a TMA and teaching something like BJJ? I don't mean the techniques that are being taught, I mean the method of teaching itself.
          Well, your style field says you do TKD(which is considered a TMA in regards to training in some regards) and BJJ. What are your opinions on the differences in how your instructors teach you?

          Comment


            #6
            my instructor is terrible at remembering names, and, we had a new guy come into class, and after the 5th time of asking his name, Danny goes "You know, when i decided to buy into this school, i got a book on how to run a martial arts school...one of the biggest points was to always remember your student's names..."

            But, my instructor is like...Jesus at teaching, though, so its all good.

            PROOF that I'm not a completely useless poster:
            http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...0&postcount=58


            Originally posted by Cy Q. Faunce
            3moose1 is correct. Sig THAT, you fucker.

            Originally posted by sochin101
            I went out with a delightful young woman who was on a regimen of pills that made her taste of burned onions.
            That is not conducive to passionate cunnilingus, my friend, let me assure you.
            Originally posted by HappyOldGuy
            I agree with moosey

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by datdamnmachine
              What are your opinions on the differences in how your instructors teach you?
              one instructor teaches silly techniques.

              one instructor teaches useful techniques.

              PROOF that I'm not a completely useless poster:
              http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...0&postcount=58


              Originally posted by Cy Q. Faunce
              3moose1 is correct. Sig THAT, you fucker.

              Originally posted by sochin101
              I went out with a delightful young woman who was on a regimen of pills that made her taste of burned onions.
              That is not conducive to passionate cunnilingus, my friend, let me assure you.
              Originally posted by HappyOldGuy
              I agree with moosey

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Captain Spaulding
                Edit: nevermind my question, as you're 2nd post answered it.

                Do you think there's a real difference between teaching a TMA and teaching something like BJJ? I don't mean the techniques that are being taught, I mean the method of teaching itself.
                Well, I think there's a difference on how you teach different types of people and that certain types of martial arts attract certain demographics. Also, early in the book, one chapter deals with "auditory", "visual" and "kinesthetic" learners.

                In this city, I'm starting to think that - -
                *takes a deep breath*
                Never mind, unworthy thought..

                It's a very interesting book, if you spend any time teaching. I don't mean martial arts, I mean teaching, period.

                Comment


                  #9
                  As a teacher who teaches others to become instructors one always has to remember, just because a student is good at what they do doesn't mean they will automatically make good instructors themselves.

                  Students should also remember that when they feel the need to critique an instructor. Teaching is just one (all be it the most visual) aspect of being part of or running a martial arts school.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Simio de las Rocas
                    As a teacher who teaches others to become instructors one always has to remember, just because a student is good at what they do doesn't mean they will automatically make good instructors themselves.

                    Students should also remember that when they feel the need to critique an instructor. Teaching is just one (all be it the most visual) aspect of being part of or running a martial arts school.
                    If you can forgive the assumption, like you, I began instructing in the military and never would have obtained my civvy instructor's ratings without that pressure cooker. In my own experience, people who are exceptional in what they do are rather less likely to be good at teaching their subjects. My thought about that is that, for someone who is a "natural", they have less to offer a student, because a good teacher has had to struggle through the basics and can offer a student solutions to mistakes, rather than not understanding why others have mistakes.

                    Thoughts?

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I wouldn't agree that people who are exceptional at what they do won't make good instructors because, more or less, those people have the aptitude to learn and teaching is nothing more than a skill which has to be taught however; being good at communication is the essential skill in teaching/coaching/instructing. Those people who find communicating their skills to others a problem, are those who don't make good teachers.

                      And yes, I learned how to teach in the armed forces long before I undertook any instructional qualifications for the martial arts I teach.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Simio de las Rocas
                        I wouldn't agree that people who are exceptional at what they do . . . And yes, I learned how to teach in the armed forces long before I undertook any instructional qualifications for the martial arts I teach.
                        Thank you, interesting thoughts.

                        In your system, do you have recognized instructor training? Most of the systems I've experienced equate black belt with instructor. The only actual instructor qualifying I've seen (besides the military system) was a course I took on refereeing tkd bouts.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Iwama Aikido - British Aikido Board - They act as the Governing Body in the UK, providing a coaching scheme and three level instructor qualification.

                          Kendo & Koryu Iai - British Kendo Association - likewise as above

                          I can't speak for others but I do not consider reaching shodan as the equivalent of being experienced sufficiently to be considered a "competent instructor" although I would and do expect my students to teach and be interested in teaching as this is another (natural progressive) aspect of martial arts development.

                          --Dave

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by datdamnmachine
                            Well, your style field says you do TKD(which is considered a TMA in regards to training in some regards) and BJJ. What are your opinions on the differences in how your instructors teach you?
                            The differences I've seen stem more from personal ways of doing things rather than "style" differences.

                            The TKD instructors all ran things in a more formal manner than my BJJ instructor, though the degree of formality varied.

                            By and large, most of the time in class was spent developing techniques. This was done to the class as a whole using both visual and audio (demonstrating a move and at the same time describing it), and then the instructor would come around to individuals and give a pointer here and there. The amount of feedback a student would get depended largely on the instructor; some gave so much information at once that the student wouldn't be able to absorb it, others gave almost no feedback at all. I found these two extremes to be exhibited by newer teachers, whereas most of the instructors who had been around awhile were somewhere in the middle.

                            Most of my TKD teachers use a set series of basic techniques (blocks, kicks, and punches) at the beginning of every class to warm up. Usually, this set of techniques didn't vary much. My BJJ teachers would sometimes use certain set drills as a warm up, but the specific techniques to use weren't always assigned and the drills changed frequently. For example, for two weeks, every class might start off with "side control escapes" or "mount escapes" for a few minutes.

                            My BJJ instructors would sometimes have a set agenda for a class, or would sometimes start off by having the students ask questions and going from there. For example, if someone asked about a certain type of guard passing, the class might involve techniques and drills about that topic. My TKD instructors, on the other hand, would either have a set agenda or would develop the class depending on the strengths and weakness of the people in class.

                            This is the stuff I can think of off the top of my head.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Simio de las Rocas
                              Iwama Aikido - British Aikido Board - They act as the Governing Body in the UK, providing a coaching scheme and three level instructor qualification.

                              Kendo & Koryu Iai - British Kendo Association - likewise as above
                              Makes sense. We're a little backwater here, in most respects. It is generally considered that if your instructor is in good standing with the original governing body (the kukkiwon for wtf tkd, for example), then you can be blessed by proxy. There is an occasional attempt to fill the void with a local body but they generally fail, due to lack of consideration. I recall one fellow who came to the tiny place I was teaching tkd at. He said "if you're going to teach tkd in Alberta, you 'must' belong to the Alberta Taekwondo Association." I said "sorry but you're wrong. May I show you the door?" Then I showed him the door. Perhaps I shouldn't have used his head to open it but we all give in to the baser instincts from time to time.


                              Originally posted by Simio de las Rocas
                              I can't speak for others but I do not consider reaching shodan as the equivalent of being experienced sufficiently to be considered a "competent instructor" although I would and do expect my students to teach and be interested in teaching as this is another (natural progressive) aspect of martial arts development.

                              --Dave
                              Neither do I but at least it bespeaks a certain competency. Some of my students have gone on to teach . . . sadly, sometimes by forming some of the worst of the worst "mcdojos".

                              Comment

                              Collapse

                              Edit this module to specify a template to display.

                              Working...
                              X