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Tampa FL Quest ninjutsu

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    Tampa FL Quest ninjutsu

    Found an intresting site for a Tampa quest center:http://www.tampaquestma.com/

    Outside of the BS history of this Hayes created system(http://www.tampaquestma.com/history.htm) and an instructor listed as being a blackbelt in 'Bushido' (http://www.tampaquestma.com/teachers.htm), it seems to me to be a slightly more LARPy version of the Bujinkan more than anything. Anyone had experience with it? I know the basic history- an offshoot of the Bujinkan started by Hayes- since Hayes is often credited with helping to start the Ninjer phenomenon (and from the clips and crazy books of his I've seen I wouldn't put it past him) I wouldn't be surprised to see bad things from it.


    Then I saw these clips:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=[yt]VBnBIKh78Cs

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=[yt]YGbkUQUFnx4

    Dear Lord....what hast the ninjerisms of Hatsumi and his disciples wrought?

    #2
    Those were some awesome videos of crap.

    Comment


      #3
      This seems awfully familiar.

      Pages 1-3: Various bullies post exclamations of hilarity.
      somewhere around pages 4-7 a newbie with his username consisting of "tampa, ninja, quest" and various numbers will post the following
      rah rah i study at jabber jabber bad speling honor blah deadly blah keyboard warriors grr aaarrhg cowards rah honor
      For 15 pages onwards:
      Questions are asked and subsequently ignored. TAMPANINJAWHUT will fixate on a single poster. Gong sau will be declared. Wherein the thread will have two conclusions.

      1. A bully goes to gym X, takes video of himself bumbling around for a while.
      2. rah wah honor insults honor thread fades to obscurity.

      Comment


        #4
        I love the kicks that while low and quite weak, still put the guy totally off balance.

        Comment


          #5
          There just aren't enough numbers to describe how str33t re4l d34dly those demos are.

          Needs more chainpunch however.

          Comment


            #6
            HAW

            HAW

            HAW

            Yeah that got old after the first 10 seconds or so.

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Happy Panda
              HAW

              HAW

              HAW

              Yeah that got old after the first 10 seconds or so.
              Pandas can't even reproduce without a team of handlers. True story.
              Last edited by nightowl; 4/20/2008 1:02pm, .

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by illegalusername
                This seems awfully familiar.

                Pages 1-3: Various bullies post exclamations of hilarity.
                somewhere around pages 4-7 a newbie with his username consisting of "tampa, ninja, quest" and various numbers will post the following

                For 15 pages onwards:
                Questions are asked and subsequently ignored. TAMPANINJAWHUT will fixate on a single poster. Gong sau will be declared. Wherein the thread will have two conclusions.

                1. A bully goes to gym X, takes video of himself bumbling around for a while.
                2. rah wah honor insults honor thread fades to obscurity.
                Don't forget that even after it's become obvious that TAMPANINJAWHUT is a troll with no connection to this crowd, everyone will continue to try and convince him that his training is useless, and/or go with the gong sau angle.

                Comment


                  #9
                  That second video, right off the bat that was the very definition of assailant compliance. That take down took five minutes of arm windmills to finish. Not to mention the Frankenstein attack they were dealing with in the first place . . . yeesh.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    this place is close to where I'm going to be at in Tampa for the next few weeks... it won't be a true gong sau but I'll at least try to get a decent review of it if they let me in
                    In summation your argument denotes a lack of intellectual honesty on your part. It is my contention that this matter would best be solved with fisticuffs. I believe I will be victorious in this regard.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I like their site already:

                      The black belt club is a three year course that leads to the eventual attainment of your black belt in To-Shin-Do. You are eligible to join the black belt club after six months of training in our Fundamentals of Self Protection program. Eligibility is based on your understanding of both physical and mental aspects of the training. We want to see that you are applying your training (including the "Three Qualities of a Black Belt") to all aspects of your life. Our younger students are asked to have recommendations from both their parents and a teacher at school showing us of their mental development. You are also required to have the recommendation of at least one of our instructors to continue your training in this course.
                      http://www.tampaquestma.com/bbclub.htm
                      In summation your argument denotes a lack of intellectual honesty on your part. It is my contention that this matter would best be solved with fisticuffs. I believe I will be victorious in this regard.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        no... wait... now I REALLY love their site (I know it's long, but I highlighted the good parts):

                        The test is quite imposing. The objective is to test the development of your ability to detect or "feel" impending danger, this sort of sixth sense. Physically what the test involves is for the individual who is testing to kneel on the floor in a seiza (say-zah) position, legs folded under, back to the person administering the test, eyes closed. There is currently only one person in the world authorized to administer the exam. That person is 34th generation Togakure-ryu (Toh-gah-ku-ray r'you) ninjutsu Grandmaster Masaaki Hatsumi (Mah sah ah ki Hot soo me). For the test Dr. Hatsumi stands behind the candidate with a training sword held high above his head. His eyes are also closed. When he feels compelled to do so, at random, he will bring the sword crashing down on the kneeling person's head. The movement is silent and swift. In order to pass the exam you must move at just the right instant to avoid being hit anywhere on your body by the slashing sword. Success or failure is verified by several attending master instructors as well as the usual room full of spectators. Failure is almost always obvious. the most effective martial art legacy in the world. On this day, like most, the room was filled with martial artists from around the world hoping to catch just a glimpse of his knowledge. Yet to look at him, he was not big, he did not look strong, his clothes looked thrown together, he did not glare and bark orders; he was so removed from the widely accepted movie or comic book image of a ninja masterthe customary tea break half way through. Topics and techniques changed with mind-boggling speed. Attacker after attacker served as vehicles for demonstration of technical principles and variations on variations. This process was repeated every day for the following week. And every day at the end of training the grandmaster would announce that it was time for the godan exam. And day after day I would struggle with the effect that announcement had on me. And every day I witnessed someone fail the exam. Twice I saw candidates succeed. In between daily training sessions, though the sights and sounds of Japan filled my senses, my thoughts were dominated by this challenge. I turned each exam I saw over in my mind again and again searching for some clues, something that might help assure success.

                        Being in Japan made everything an adventure. My language skills returned rapidly day-by-day. My wife's promotion to second degree black belt some how eased the tension of my own unresolved agenda. I managed to speak with both my friend and teacher Stephen Hayes as well as my favorite Japanese master instructor Isamu Shiraishi (ee sah mu shee rah ee shee). I drew strength and comfort from both men's council. Their confidence in my skills was reassuring. Still, as the days passed, my departure date grew closer and I felt the pressure build.

                        It was now the morning of October 13th, the day before I was to leave Japan. Thoughts of my exam were temporarily banished by the hustle and bustle of Tokyo's colorful streets. Today was the big shopping day and we were loading up. So many wonderful things to see, so many unique things that you can't buy in the states. We made our way to Asakusa, an open market style-shopping district in Tokyo. The long walkway is lined on both sides by flea market-like booths selling everything from swords to candy, kimonos and Godzilla monsters. At the markets end is the Kin Ryu (gold dragon) shrine. It had been so many years since I was there the experience was fresh once again. I made sure to do everything I knew how by Japanese custom to bring me good luck.

                        The day passed too quickly and soon we rendezvoused with Stephen and Rumiko Hayes at our appointed meeting place. From there we began our journey by subways and trains to Ayase (eye-ya-say). As I sat rocking gently on the train I realized it had not taken long for my preoccupation to dominate my thoughts once again.

                        Ayase is the home of the world famous Budokan (Boo doh kahn. The Budokan is a convention center and training complex built by the Japanese government for Budo (martial studies. The structure has several levels, an arena, courtyards for outdoor training, and a number of training rooms. It is the largest structure of its kind in the world. Training in almost every martial art conceivable is offered, from Judo to Kyudo (classical archery). This is where tonight's training with the grandmaster was to take place. I had never been there and was very excited at the prospect of not just visiting but training in this monument to martial arts. Then it hit me. If I were to achieve my goal on this adventure it would be done at the Budokan.

                        The weather had been threatening all day. As we left the Ayase station bound for the Budokan it began to rain. We stopped to let some traffic pass. I was speaking with my wife when I abruptly looked to my right, strangely compelled to do so. Standing there next to me was Dr. Hatsumi. I wondered how and when he had just appeared like that. Quite casually he began a conversation with me through his interpreter as we continued toward the Budokan. He asked questions about my extensive martial arts background. When I told him of disciplines I had explored and things I had experienced his response was frequently 'me too.' We spoke of related disappointments and the unique sense of fulfillment that this art seems to bestow. Whether it was the timing of his appearance or his focus on our similar backgrounds, I felt the occurrence was auspicious.

                        As we approached the Budokan I was awed by the size of the place and the unique architecture, sort of a mixture of Star Trek and traditional Japanese in concreteI remembered first hearing of this test, when my teacher had become the first American to pass the test. I thought about how this test had excited and haunted me, piquing my imagination for over fifteen years since I had first learned of it. All of this happened as I walked those few paces to the space on the floor indicated by Dr. Hatsumi's sword.

                        As I began to kneel, taking my place, this fascinating paradox of lightning recall and calm harmony continued. I was the eye of the storm. I was vaguely aware of my right knee touching the ground as I knelt. So strange, I thought. This is it. The moment has arrived. Success will come from letting go.

                        "Yeah! Alright, alright!" That was Stephen Hayes' voice. Suddenly I was on my feet. There were yells, there was clapping. Dr. Hatsumi was grinning broadly. He hugged me and said something in my ear I did not understand. What happened, I thought. 'You did it,' my rational mind replied, 'that's what happened!' It all came rushing in. The room, two seconds ago silent and tense, was exploding with energy. Friends and strangers congratulated me. I glanced at my friend, master instructor Shiraishi sensei; his smile was pure and broad. He winked. Dr. Hatsumi heartily tossed the sword toward the crowd, at no one in particular. He seemed as happy as I was.

                        I milled about, shaking hands and taking photos, somewhat stunned. I began to settle down and I started to analyze. What had I done? How had I done it? All I could think was "it" did me. "It" was so strong it almost blew me out the door. I felt myself beginning to disconnect from the moment, analyzing, drawn by desire to fully understand. "Oh no you don't," I said to myself. There will be plenty of time for reflection, I reminded myself. It's a long ride back from Tokyo to Tampa. Be here, now. I had my arm around Shiraishi-san's shoulder. I heard a camera shutter click. The satisfaction of a dream fulfilled rushed over me in a wave. I smiled broadly, another click. I would return from this quest victorious.
                        http://www.tampaquestma.com/articles.htm#5th

                        This is like straight out of "Diary of a Ninjer"...
                        In summation your argument denotes a lack of intellectual honesty on your part. It is my contention that this matter would best be solved with fisticuffs. I believe I will be victorious in this regard.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          you guiz, how sweet would it be to practice teh bjj BUT with those cool ninja outfits?

                          think about it...

                          the awesomeness....

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Originally posted by partyboy
                            this place is close to where I'm going to be at in Tampa for the next few weeks... it won't be a true gong sau but I'll at least try to get a decent review of it if they let me in
                            That was what I was hoping for. Care to do a review? I'm not a dojo storming advocate by any means.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I was wondering about this myself. I am checking out Stephen K. Hayes actual school in Dayton, OH Monday. I have known about it for many years but never went up there as it's about an hour away from me. No real need to drive that far to train with the good schools around Cincinnati.

                              I'm game for some Ninja action and it sounds like there might be a few moves practical you can pick up.

                              Comment

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