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So, I got an email titled "women's mixed martial arts seminar"

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    So, I got an email titled "women's mixed martial arts seminar"

    I'm still signed up to various listservs from back when I was in college, and this morning when I checked my email imagine my surprise when I saw a message from one of these listservs titled "women's mixed martial arts seminar".

    I thought, "Cool, mixed martial arts." However, when I clicked on the link provided, instead I got this: http://www.nwmaf.org/mc/page.do?site...1&orgId=nawmaf

    The NWMAF is very pleased to announce that we're heading north to New York for Special Training 2008. Many of our members make their home in the Northeast, so we look forward to a large local turnout. But no matter where you live, you should plan on working out with us next summer!



    Year after year, Special Training offers a spectacular weekend of training for women and girls. Imagine, 4 days with nothing to do but live and breathe the martial arts, all in the company of women. Add in amazing instructors and classes for everyone regardless of age, experience, fitness level. From Aikido to Jujitsu, from no belt to black belt, from 6 to 106 ... you are welcome at Special Training!



    Want more? Then come early for the Self Defense Teacher Training! Designed for new and experienced instructors, certified and non-certified alike, the Self Defense Teacher Training will take place July 16-17, 2008 also at Hobart and William Smith Colleges. Conveniently scheduled prior to ST'08, you can register for one or both events and not miss a thing.
    What!? What kind of nimrod would refer to this as "mixed martial arts"?
    Lone Wolf McQuade Final Fight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmrDe_mYUXg

    #2
    Definitely not MMA. It looks like it is a camp open to all martial art styles and thus "mixed" martial arts. Very misleading, but anyone looking for MMA can tell that this camp is not for MMA.
    One of the best Bullshido investigations ever written: http://www.bullshido.org/David_Kujawski_Investigation

    "disgruntled ex student who couldn't hack training with Dave and his material and opted out (could be called pussied out) of training to go to Sambo" - Mor Sao

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      #3
      It is technically mixing martial arts but I think they went with this specific term because its somewhat a buzzword.

      Doesn't actually say what they teach, just that all styles are welcome.....and teacher training in a long weekend? What?

      Comment


        #4
        From their site:

        One of the most frequent questions we get is "How do I pick a good martial arts school?", followed closely by "What style is best for me?" We will have more information on different martial arts styles in the future; for now, we'll concentrate more on finding a good school. This is an important decision, as you will probably infer from the length of this answer and the amount of "up-front" time we recommend you invest! Once you've found the right school, though, you'll realize that the time was well worth spending.



        The first step in picking a style and school is to ask yourself a series of questions about what you want from your training experience:


        * Why do you want to train? Are you interested in getting in shape, learning a little basic self defense, competing, exploring a whole system of personal development, becoming part of a community?

        ....


        * How important to you are martial arts traditions and cultures? Do you want a school that observes them strictly, or do you prefer a different sort of atmosphere?


        * How important is the spiritual/philosophical component of training?
        ...


        Once you've got those nailed down, it's time to start checking out the schools in your area. If you're a beginner, it's generally less important to focus on a particular style than it is to focus on your overall goals - they can often be met by any number of individual styles. Make a list of the schools in your area and prepare to spend a bit of time on the phone. Ask for descriptions of the style(s) taught, the structure of the curriculum, the cost of training and any additional fees (uniforms, required equipment, testing fees), and whether or not long-term contracts are required. Don’t be put off if the person you speak with requests that you take a trial class before discussing fees – that’s a common practice in this business. Ask also about the qualifications of the instructors - how long they've trained, how long they've been teaching, the extent to which junior belts are involved in instruction. Be sure to make your own goals very clear as well and listen carefully to how your needs are addressed.

        ...

        As you check out the schools, here are some specific things to look for:


        ...

        * Are costs, contracts, etc. clearly explained? How do they compare with other schools in the area? If contracts are required, can you take an initial short-term contract (one or two months) before making a long-term commitment? How often do prices go up?


        * Does the school provide a clean, safe training environment?


        * Do the instructors treat each other and all students with courtesy and respect? Do you see any signs of abuse (mental, physical, or emotional) masquerading as "discipline"? Trust your instincts on this one - if it looks and feels abusive, it probably is. Run, do not walk, away from that school!


        * Are qualified instructors teaching all classes? In many traditional systems, students are expected to assist in class while they're still junior belts - but watch out for schools in which junior belts are providing primary instruction in beginner's classes, women's classes, etc.

        ...

        * Are women represented among the advanced ranks and/or instructors in the school? If not, why not? And don't be afraid to ask!


        ...
        * Does the school owner/head instructor guarantee promotion to black belt (or its equivalent) within a fixed period of time? This is a good warning sign that the school may be more of a belt factory than a place to embark on a true path of lifelong development.

        ...

        Finally, here are a few miscellaneous caveats that may help:



        Certificates don't guarantee quality. A huge number of organizations offer "certification" of rank. Many are legitimate, conferring rank based on real accomplishment and sound criteria; others can simply be bought. Unless you already know something about the organization(s) conferring certification, pay more attention to what you see and hear than what you see on someone's wall. Of course, it's perfectly reasonable to ask what those certificates mean and where they come from!


        Martial arts training is not necessarily the same as self defense training. Although all martial arts were originally developed as systems of defense, the degree to which practical self defense techniques are integrated into the formal curriculum varies widely among schools. So if self defense is your primary interest, make sure you find out exactly how a school's curriculum will help you meet that goal.

        "Masters" may know a lot, but they can't make your decision for you. Don't let a school owner/head instructor tell you what you need or want!



        So, that’s about it! Good luck with your quest, and let us know how it turned out!

        Looks like despite the misleading advertisement, they have a lot of the same views you'd find here.

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          #5

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            #6
            Was it even possible to grapple under the rules?
            Lone Wolf McQuade Final Fight: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VmrDe_mYUXg

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Blue Negation
              From their site:




              Looks like despite the misleading advertisement, they have a lot of the same views you'd find here.
              That's relieving to see they have some good ideas, though I noticed that when choosing a school sparring wasn't even mentioned.

              I also like this bit:

              "Masters" may know a lot, but they can't make your decision for you. Don't let a school owner/head instructor tell you what you need or want!

              This happens alot in Bullshido/McDojo school from my experience. Often they'll convince you by letting you know how awesome and unbeatable their style is.

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