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    Too Many Rules

    Is it just me, or are some of these MMA leagues that are comming up have too many rules? Case and point, I saw the ads on this website for the BodogFight MMA league and decided to watch their videos. They DON'T allow elbows, PERIOD. Personally, I liked it better in the Vale Tudo days.

    Insidently, I would be willing to go as far as to say that vale tudo may have been safer than people think. For one thing, they didn't have gloves. When there is no gloves to protect your hands while punching, your hands can only take so much before you HAVE NO CHOICE but to resort to grappling. This would mean less blows to the head, and less chance of the development of "punch-drunk syndrome".

    The fact is, the bare human hand can only take so much. If you want to keep the fight standing, you can always use elbows, and knees, but those are strictly short range weapons in my oppinion. You could also use kicks, but kicks tend compromise your ballance in a way that could make you vulnerable to being taken down. This definitely affects a fighters inclination to keep the fight standing or take it to the ground.

    All I am saying is, Vale Tudo had a different dynamic to it that is going to be lost if these newer organizations continue to go overboard with the rules. I know the fighters have to be kept safe but there is a fine line that separates fighter safety and sucking up to people who don't like the no holds bard paradigm; a line which the modern MMA leagues are comming dangerously close to crossing.

    #2
    are you arguing for better fighter safety through broken hands?

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      #3
      I understand your point about bareknuckle...Lenny McClean made a similar one...which I imagine you've seen. Rules for mma, are largely dictated by licensing demands. We're only seeing it on tv, in the USA, because of gloves, no headbutts, attacks to the spine, eye gouges, etc....they want to make money...so they have to temper the gore and risk of injury.

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        #4
        not to mention that it's many times not the league that brings in the rules. i get the impression that if it were up to Dana White, he'd have no rules in the UFC (kinda how it was when it began). i believe it is the NSAC (Nevada State Athletic Comission) that decides what rules are to be imposed for it to work.

        in Japan, as i understand it, the elbow is considered a lethal weapon. which is why we don't have elbows in Pride and K1 (much like how the closed fist was a lethal weapon in France, hence savate used slaps instead).

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          #5
          Originally posted by ronaldk
          in Japan, as i understand it, the elbow is considered a lethal weapon. which is why we don't have elbows in Pride and K1 (much like how the closed fist was a lethal weapon in France, hence savate used slaps instead).
          PRIDE used to have very few rules until the ufc bought them out.

          What I would like to know is, do any organizations still exist that do vale tudo?

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            #6
            When there is no gloves to protect your hands while punching, your hands can only take so much before you HAVE NO CHOICE but to resort to grappling.
            I'm guessing you've never seen Igor Vovchanchyn fight Vale Tudo?

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              #7
              Originally posted by musicalmike235
              PRIDE used to have very few rules until the ufc bought them out.

              What I would like to know is, do any organizations still exist that do vale tudo?
              Pride didn't allow elbows even before the UFC bought them.

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                #8
                Pride is odd- fighters can't elbow but they can bronco kick.

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                  #9
                  I was under the impression the "no elbows to the head" rule was to lower the chances of a fight being stopped because of a cut.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Das Moose
                    I was under the impression the "no elbows to the head" rule was to lower the chances of a fight being stopped because of a cut.
                    QFT.

                    Fans tend to think of fight stoppage because of a cut as pretty lame. When KenFlo cut Chris Leben with his elbow, for example, I think it was pretty clear that Chris was more than willing to keep going.

                    Originally posted by ronaldk
                    not to mention that it's many times not the league that brings in the rules.
                    Also true. In Texas, it was "no gloves" but also "no closed fist strikes to the head" for many years. Then for awhile it looked as though 8oz gloves would be required, just as in boxing. Now both head strikes and the standard 4oz gloves are in.

                    Also, elbows were going to be restricted to Thai boxing only, to preserve one of the more traditional aspects of that sport. However, by the time Kendall Grove arrived in Houston for UFC 69, elbows were back and he used them freely on Alan Belcher until he got bored and choked Alan unconcious.
                    Last edited by sdave; 8/05/2007 11:48am, .

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                      #11
                      I don't remember the name of the promotion but WingChunLawyer, made a thread about a Brazilian Org that used the old school Vale Tudo rules.

                      It's Rio Heroes, here's WCL's thread:
                      http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=56963

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