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What makes a good fighter?

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    What makes a good fighter?

    I ask for your opinions on what makes a good fighter in regards to rulesets. If someone can't do well in a particular ruleset, does this make them a poor fighter?

    #2
    It depends what ruleset they're good at and which they're bad at. If a good boxer goes into a point karate tournament and gets DQed because he knocks out his opponent, he is still a good fighter.
    Dan Severn loves raping people.

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      #3
      Just to play devil's advocate, doesn't that show a lack of control? Something a good fighter should definitely have?

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        #4
        Originally posted by Hui_Xiu
        I ask for your opinions on what makes a good fighter in regards to rulesets. If someone can't do well in a particular ruleset, does this make them a poor fighter?
        Not necessarily.
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          #5
          Control is hitting what you aim at. That is what a good fighter needs.

          Fighter's who train to not hit very hard, end up not hitting very hard.

          What makes a good fighter?

          Technique, strategy, speed, strength, and endurance.
          And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

          --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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            #6
            Yes, I agree, but don't you want to be able control the force of your attack? You don't want to go all out, all of the time.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Hui_Xiu
              Just to play devil's advocate, doesn't that show a lack of control? Something a good fighter should definitely have?
              No. It shows that the rules for that tournament weren't testing fighting ability.
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                #8
                Originally posted by Hui_Xiu
                Yes, I agree, but don't you want to be able control the force of your attack? You don't want to go all out, all of the time.
                Sure, as long as that's not a cryptic side-shuffling excuse for not going all out, ever.
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                  #9
                  First off, you want to have a forceful, all out attack, before you have to worry about "controlling it". I.E. if your punches and kicks lack speed and power, gaining that should be the priority. Another thing- if you flinch alot and really are afraid to get hit, you probably aren't going to be a good fighter. doesn't make you a bad person, or a coward, or anyhting else. Just means you might want to take up a new hobby and avoid getting into fights. The sad news is, those guys on Pride/UFC/EPSN Friday night fights are good fighters- end of story. IF you think there is some magic way around that, you are wasting your time. God knows, I did.
                  "Coffee is for Closers" GlenGarry Glenross

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Scrapper
                    Technique, strategy, speed, strength, and endurance.
                    ...and lots of sack.....:5squeeze:

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                      #11
                      Another way to put it is, you should be looking forward to sparring full contact, and have little worries about the "rule set". If some one says, lets box, or roll, you should be thinking "I'm in!", not, what are the rules, will there be control, etc.
                      "Coffee is for Closers" GlenGarry Glenross

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Hui_Xiu
                        Yes, I agree, but don't you want to be able control the force of your attack? You don't want to go all out, all of the time.

                        Actually, I pretty much do.

                        At least 80% or better most of the time anyway.
                        And lo, Kano looked down upon the field and saw the multitudes. Amongst them were the disciples of Uesheba who were greatly vexed at his sayings. And Kano spake: "Do not be concerned with the mote in thy neighbor's eye, when verily thou hast a massive stick in thine ass".

                        --Scrolls of Bujutsu: Chapter 5 vs 10-14.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by Hui_Xiu
                          Yes, I agree, but don't you want to be able control the force of your attack? You don't want to go all out, all of the time.
                          You don't knock someone out by overcoming them with lots of strength and speed. You knock them out by expertly placing a blow to sensitive areas. A good straight punch will knock someone out just as much as a cross or a hook.

                          In short, rulesets aren't there to do anything but protect the athletes. They add an artificial dimension, a complication, to a game. Think of it like soccer/football. The "no using hands to move the ball" is an artificial limitation on the game meant to increase its difficulty. The reasoning goes that if you can score a goal using only your feet, you possess more skill than if you could use both hands and feet to accomplish the same objective.

                          So, if a ruleset says "no head punches to the back of the head while on the ground," it's just there to promote safety. It's asking you to achieve the same result (KO, tap, etc.) without being able to use something that would make that result too easy to achieve.

                          To that end, being a good fighter is independent of the ruleset. It requires strength, speed, timing, technique, awareness, endurance, etc.
                          --
                          L.

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                            #14
                            I think a good fighter should be able to adapt to a different rule set very quickly.

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                              #15
                              I agree with pretty much everything that has been posted. To new2bjj, I'm not asking this for advice, just wondering what everyone's opinion on it.

                              One of the things I was looking for is the importance of stamina. In a sport fight, stamina is of course very important. But, out of the ring, how important is it? If someone doesn't have the stamina for a 3 round fight, does it make them a bad fighter?

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