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So, I started Tai Chi...

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  • TheOtherChris
    replied
    Originally posted by DAYoung
    That looks very difficult to apply, and a little precarious. Have you tried it?
    Yes and no. It works well against a cross-grab which is quite a common way to start a fight (grab and punch). I chose it as it's the clearest application of that section of the form and the one that looks the most like the form.
    Last edited by TheOtherChris; 3/07/2007 8:31am, .

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  • Moleculo
    replied
    Originally posted by Repulsive Monkey
    You've clearly watched one too many kung fu movies.
    You don't know the half of it.

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  • meataxe
    replied
    Originally posted by DAYoung
    Tell me all about your Peng.
    That's not a come-on, is it?

    Peng to me is a circular motion in a vertical plane. Imagine pushing a giant ball and you are pushing it near the top. If you push hard enough, the ball will roll and you will be lifted up. This could be used to dissipate an incoming force. Also, since the "pusher" is uplifted, the "pushee" has an opportunit for a throw. I guess it is expansive force in a sense, because you are not just collapsing. You are not meeting the force head on either.

    Peng doesn't have to be a reaction to incoming force, it can initiate the force. I don't have an easy to describe example, but it would still feature the circular motion in a vertical plane. Again, it would not be force against force in direct oppostion, but at a different angle thanks to the circle.

    This differs from the explaination I've heard from other styles. I'm not sure why.

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  • Bang!
    replied
    * PLEASE NOTE: products and sizes may vary and pictures are just a representation of the product and may not be the actual size.

    You've clearly watched one too many kung fu movies.

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  • Moleculo
    replied
    Now you put syrup on a pancake it becomes the pancake; you
    put it in a buttersworth bottle and it BECOMES Mrs Buttersworth

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  • Bang!
    replied
    I first saw that technique from a bagua guy. He thought it was really funny, because he would show the set-up and then go, "look: one finger!" and then point to the ground as his victim dropped to their knees wearing an agonized expression.

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  • Iscariot
    replied
    Originally posted by DAYoung
    That looks very difficult to apply, and a little precarious. Have you tried it?
    It's actually very easy to apply, just not the way that's shown there. I know it as nikkyo from my time in Aikido.

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  • DAYoung
    replied
    Originally posted by meataxe
    For the record, I had a standing joint lock applied in a push-hands tournament. It was fast enough that I was not able to counter and didn't really see it coming. Far from a fight-ender in this case, but enough to give me a sore shoulder for a couple of weeks. If you could apply a few of these in succession, the would add up--sorta like leg kicks or body blows.

    As for peng, I notice that some styles of TCC are a lot more vague about the definition than our style would be.
    Tell me all about your Peng.

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  • DAYoung
    replied
    Originally posted by Repulsive Monkey
    There are a few things in Needle at Sea Bottom that I like.

    One is a standing arm break. Now, you'll hear people go on about how standing joint locks don't work and yada yada yada. Okay, well, they often don't -- at least not in the context of submissions, IMO. However explosive movements can
    Excellent - thanks, RM. I suppose it could turn into that classic aikido technique, where you pull the arm down in the direction it's going, and then reverse it, dropping low and turning it into an arm lock.

    It might be useful as a distraction of sorts, while you sweep, kick or punch, but...

    Videos of the application would be interesting, 'cause at the moment it's looking a little dubious.

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  • DAYoung
    replied
    Originally posted by TheOtherChris
    One application for the "Needle" is a hand-lock.


    "Needle at the bottom of the Sea" is a an ancient chinese teh funny, since the victim feels like he is being stung by seven very teh deadly needles (!!) while ducking forwards and downwards as if diving.
    That looks very difficult to apply, and a little precarious. Have you tried it?

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  • meataxe
    replied
    Originally posted by Repulsive Monkey
    There are a few things in Needle at Sea Bottom that I like.

    One is a standing arm break. Now, you'll hear people go on about how standing joint locks don't work and yada yada yada. Okay, well, they often don't -- at least not in the context of submissions, IMO. However explosive movements can work. In this case, it doesn't take a clever brain doctor to imagine how this one plays out.

    {snip}
    For the record, I had a standing joint lock applied in a push-hands tournament. It was fast enough that I was not able to counter and didn't really see it coming. Far from a fight-ender in this case, but enough to give me a sore shoulder for a couple of weeks. If you could apply a few of these in succession, the would add up--sorta like leg kicks or body blows.

    As for peng, I notice that some styles of TCC are a lot more vague about the definition than our style would be.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bang!
    replied
    There are a few things in Needle at Sea Bottom that I like.

    One is a standing arm break. Now, you'll hear people go on about how standing joint locks don't work and yada yada yada. Okay, well, they often don't -- at least not in the context of submissions, IMO. However explosive movements can

    Leave a comment:


  • Moleculo
    replied
    Be formless; like pancake syrup.

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  • TheOtherChris
    replied
    One application for the "Needle" is a hand-lock.


    "Needle at the bottom of the Sea" is a an ancient chinese teh funny, since the victim feels like he is being stung by seven very teh deadly needles (!!) while ducking forwards and downwards as if diving.
    Last edited by TheOtherChris; 3/05/2007 7:38am, .

    Leave a comment:


  • Iscariot
    replied
    A third of a form? Sounds like the speed at which I might do some actual work....

    Did you contact that Kendo instructor to see if he did any Iai or could cater to your feebleness? :p

    Leave a comment:

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