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    #61
    Originally posted by Shinoobie
    I am in the Bujinkan because I tried a class and found a guy that I can't kick the ass of. Period. I took a class at EVERY single school that I could find in my area and the Bujinkan kicked my ass the best. If I find something better, I will move on. You should too.
    Seriously? I haven't met a Bujinkan guy who could fight who didn't already know how to fight. And if anything, the Bujinkan training made them worse at fighting. Did you actually fight your instructor? Because the vast majority of Bujinkan school don't spar, will definitely refuse challenge matches, and give you a lecture about ego...and how they don't have any...and how you should be more humble and egofree like them.

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      #62
      Originally posted by Shinoobie
      I am in the Bujinkan because I tried a class and found a guy that I can't kick the ass of. Period. I took a class at EVERY single school that I could find in my area and the Bujinkan kicked my ass the best. If I find something better, I will move on. You should too.
      So you kicked the ass of all of the BJJ, judo and muay thai instructors you fought when shopping around?

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        #63
        Every style has its merits, something to learn from everything.
        As for ninjutsu, if you're so eager to learn "stealth arts", join
        the military and get into a special ops group, probably the best
        way, the only other method I could think of would be trial and
        error, something better suited to a virtual environment like a
        video game (not sure how many of ya play games), but playing
        SOCOM online against live players and playing paintball
        with ex-military has taught me a quite a bit about stealth
        and sniping techniques I would have only gotten in the military.

        As for not learning ninjutsu within the Bujinkan, that really depends
        on your teacher. I'm very fortunate to have a kind and selfless teacher
        who's already shown me weapons I've never thought of, and weapons
        most Bujinkan students never get trained in. He's also dedicated classes
        to stealth at night, they have been really infomative, plus I'll never think of shadows
        the same, either. Also, think of metsubishi (not sure if that's how it is spelled) isn't
        Budo Taijutsu, that's Ninjutsu. Really though, ninjutsu is many things and
        beyond stealth, acting is another point that most people don't account as
        part of Ninjutsu, but then again, it seems most people in this forum are
        interested in hurting people more than actually learning and improving
        themselves.

        Comment


          #64
          Originally posted by Karasu
          Every style has its merits, something to learn from everything.
          As for ninjutsu, if you're so eager to learn "stealth arts", join
          the military and get into a special ops group, probably the best
          way, the only other method I could think of would be trial and
          error, something better suited to a virtual environment like a
          video game (not sure how many of ya play games), but playing
          SOCOM online against live players and playing paintball
          with ex-military has taught me a quite a bit about stealth
          and sniping techniques I would have only gotten in the military.
          I agree that if you're actually interested in learning stealth arts, you should probably sign up for special ops or an al qaeda cell. The type of stealth training you'll learn from a ninjutsu instructor is going to be no more valuable than playing a few games of capture the flag at night.

          Originally posted by Karasu
          Really though, ninjutsu is many things and
          beyond stealth, acting is another point that most people don't account as
          part of Ninjutsu, but then again, it seems most people in this forum are
          interested in hurting people more than actually learning and improving
          themselves.
          I think that's a pretty glib way of looking at it, but this is a no BS martial arts forum, which means we are generally interested in martial arts as it applies to fighting, or combat. I don't see spiritual enlightenment or fortune cookie philosophy implied by combining the words "martial" and "art". Before you start lecturing people about what ninjutsu is, I suggest reading through some of the old threads on the subject. Most of the people here who have such a negative opinion of ninjutsu, budo taijutsu, the x-kans, whatever, have that opinion because we wasted so much of our time LARPing in them, and are pissed off about it.

          Anyone claiming to teach you ninjutsu is either conning you, or at best, giving you crappy unrealistic training based off of a very questionable lineage.

          Comment


            #65
            Originally posted by Karasu
            Every style has its merits,
            This is simply not true - and it is this type of "wolly" thinking that allows so many fraudsters and conmen to exist in the world. Any art (or indeed anything at all) only has merit if it delivers what it promises. Sadly so many fall short of that simple measuring stick.

            Konigun anyone?

            Originally posted by Karasu
            but then again, it seems most people in this forum are
            interested in hurting people more than actually learning and improving
            themselves.
            If you want spiritual growth then go to church/mosque/whatever.

            Martial arts are about combat - any other benefits are anciliary.

            Bullshido is specifically concerned with fraud in the MA's, but at the core of all it's debating is one factor - combat effectiveness. If this is not what you wish to debate (either pro or con) then pop over to my old stomping grounds of MAP where they will welcome any delusion your care to entertain with much more grace than you will find here.

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              #66
              OK what I meant by saying every style has it merits, I'm not implying just in the fact that it's meant for violence. That holds true for any exercise, unless of course you're not learning from it, but that's no one's fault but your own.

              And as for the spiritual aspect of martial arts, many of the fighting styles that your fighting styles have evolved from had moral ethics you were required to abide by to train, and you'd be limited in what you were allowed to learn until you achieved rank. The reason for these morals, and these ranks, well what happens if you're a psycho, I don't know you, and I just trained you how to break someone's arm. Then come the moral justifications of teaching you such techniques, then you use that to rape women instead of defending yourself and your family. That's why I believe there should be an emphasis placed on "spiritual growth" or expanding yourself ethically, you can always grow, and I've made the mistake that I thought achieved all I could in the growth of my personality.

              I think if more people had more patience and applied a little more thought about they were doing and saying, people wouldn't speak so badly of this forum. Alot of the conflicts I see here remind me of the christian who feels so desperate to push Jesus down your throat that they want to say every negitive thing they can to get you to change your mind. "Oh I'm going to hell? Well I guess I'll see you there." Just don't feel as if it's required to attack people to provide a good point, there are better means, it just takes a little extra to be nice, and people tend to listen a little more to people who want to speak, not shout. (Just my two cents...)

              I understand people's thoughts on certain subjects, like the X-Kans, but I didn't join Bujinkan to become a ninja, I joined because of my previous experience in Jiujutsu (japanese, not BJJ), and Kendo. What I have learned, has filled in the holes that other martial arts couldn't fill. I'm not here to defend or attack anyone's style, I would like to know all I can about martial arts, then I can say which martial art is the best for me, not for anyone else. It has definitely broadened my ideas of weapon and body combat. Also, I've noticed that quite a bit of close quarter military combat arts use Taijutsu extensively, not sure if any of you have noticed that, and I'm not suggesting it's better, just pointing out a choice made by militaries across the world.
              Last edited by Karasu; 2/16/2007 3:20pm, .

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                #67
                JeSuS TaP DaNcInG ChRiSt On A pOgO StIcK!!!!!!!

                USE PARAGRAPHS

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                  #68
                  lol I never claimed to be a master of the english language or anything else for that matter :)

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                    #69
                    Name me ONE army that uses taijutsu that has had ANY success in combat against an enemy other than pygmies armed with sharpened fruit

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                      #70
                      Or charge up to attack then freeze and let themselves get shot.

                      Comment


                        #71
                        lol you obviously have no idea how close quarters combat works
                        ok here's a generic combat situation
                        Your MP5 has malfunctioned, and despite all attempts to get it to
                        work, you can't fix it. At this point, you'll have to rely on your side
                        arm and whatever weapons you have, for this situation you also have
                        a knife. This is what I'm talking about Taijutsu, the knife is used
                        exactly as we're trained, one of the trademarks would be the hooking
                        motion to capture a limb or weapon with the knife. While holding the
                        gun the right hand, and a knife in the left, you have acces to both
                        the knife and firearm. Great for encounters within point blank ranges
                        I've talked about this previously with a friend and he was actually
                        familiar with this from a video game he called Snake Eater, if I remember
                        correctly. That is part of the nature of taijutsu, being able to use the
                        same "movements" of the body to be able to use most weapons effectively
                        Last edited by Karasu; 2/16/2007 4:21pm, .

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                          #72
                          SOOOO the police office has no knowledge about close quaters combat, but your friend saw this move in a video game???


                          Please don't post again until your hair starts to grow on your balls

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                            #73
                            actually, I play video games occasionally, and I'm not bad at SOCOM 2 and 3 (only one's I'll play), but everything with CQC, I learned before Taijutsu, and it wasn't from a game. I'm not here to impress, but I'm not gonna lie, or try to belittle you, but I do enjoy an intelligent arguement, hey, one of you might even point me to the next art I want to learn, who knows.

                            Comment


                              #74
                              Originally posted by Karasu
                              lol you obviously have no idea how close quarters combat works
                              ok here's a generic combat situation
                              Your MP5 has malfunctioned, and despite all attempts to get it to
                              work, you can't fix it. At this point, you'll have to rely on your side
                              arm and whatever weapons you have, for this situation you also have
                              a knife. This is what I'm talking about Taijutsu, the knife is used
                              exactly as we're trained, one of the trademarks would be the hooking
                              motion to capture a limb or weapon with the knife. While holding the
                              gun the right hand, and a knife in the left, you have acces to both
                              the knife and firearm. Great for encounters within point blank ranges
                              I've talked about this previously with a friend and he was actually
                              familiar with this from a video game he called Snake Eater, if I remember
                              correctly. That is part of the nature of taijutsu, being able to use the
                              same "movements" of the body to be able to use most weapons effectively
                              You have not answered the question and your reference to a video game is at best asinine and at worst neolithically stupid.

                              Answer the question befroe posting any more banality

                              Comment


                                #75
                                Why don't you ask the milliary vetrans like Asia who have been in combat, is in active service member and has studied Bujikan about how realistic and effective it is.

                                Or Virus who I think was 6th dan in taijitsu or Mongo or.......

                                The list goes on and on and on

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