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Shaolin Kempo

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  • sidran
    replied
    Originally posted by TehDeadlyDimMak
    Anyways most places I've found are willing to charge for individual lessons rather than monthly fees if you explain your dillema. This makes cross training more affordable so you don't end up paying three consecutive monthly fees.
    This is true. I've had similar experiences. Sometimes they may give you a discount, though you obviously shouldn't ask for one nor expect it.

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  • TehDeadlyDimMak
    replied
    Why did you have to say that? Why?

    I've been having trouble sleeping recently and now you have to go and say that...

    Anyways most places I've found are willing to charge for individual lessons rather than monthly fees if you explain your dillema. This makes cross training more affordable so you don't end up paying three consecutive monthly fees.

    Leave a comment:


  • patfromlogan
    replied
    Originally posted by Axelton
    how the hell do you people have the time and money for going to more than one school? granted im a college student so im dirt poor but damn.
    I spent a lot more time on martial arts than studying. For that matter I spent more time on oral sex than studying.

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  • metalforlunch
    replied
    hahaha funny you should mention that axel, the reason why I probably haven't found more schools is because I don't make enough money to take any more martial arts than the ones I'm doing right now. As far as time, where I go to college is not far from my dojo and I make sure to schedule my college courses around my martial arts schedule. Lots of free time during winter and summer break too.

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  • Axelton
    replied
    how the hell do you people have the time and money for going to more than one school? granted im a college student so im dirt poor but damn.

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  • patfromlogan
    replied
    Vallari's original skill set is from Kajukenbo, so he can't be too messed up, I hope. If the instruction seems headed toward Aikido and not learning ground... Well, If you are having fun with SK and if you are with out the responsiblilties and aches of age, you can work out in a couple schools concurrently.

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  • TehDeadlyDimMak
    replied
    Originally posted by metalforlunch
    Thanks for the advice, you guys have been very helpful. My instructor has been giving me free aikido lessons, which is kinda cool but a little too passive for me to find much worth in it. It does seem to work better when people grab a hold of you on the wrists or lapels, but beyond that I'm not really loving it and it still isn't making me any better of a ground fighter, which was my original goal.
    On this board Aikido is generally famous for being too compliant. While there are Aikido practitioners that practice with aliveness and are for lack of a better term "badass" the large majority tends to be complacent in having their partners give up their wrists and throw themselves.

    Throwing styles like Judo are more popular when it comes to throwing an opponent that does not want to be thrown. Styles that tend to emphasize groundfighting the most include Brazilian Jujitsu, Gracie-Barra Jujitsu, and other variants of those styles.

    It's important not to get those mixed up with Classical Japanese Jujitsu, which is an extremely broad branch of styles with less consistency when it comes to quality of subject matter.

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  • MacWombat
    replied
    Originally posted by metalforlunch
    Thanks for the advice, you guys have been very helpful. My instructor has been giving me free aikido lessons, which is kinda cool but a little too passive for me to find much worth in it. It does seem to work better when people grab a hold of you on the wrists or lapels, but beyond that I'm not really loving it and it still isn't making me any better of a ground fighter, which was my original goal.

    Some aikidoka who crosstrain in BJJ can get wristlocks to work on the ground. It doesn't seem like all those years of aikido for just that really seem to translate though. If you are looking for groundfighting most people are gonna suggest BJJ. It will be the easiest to find, least McDojoised, and it's very fun and addicting. However, it is fairly expensive normally.

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  • metalforlunch
    replied
    again thanks for all the suggestions

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  • patfromlogan
    replied
    Originally posted by metalforlunch
    ...so we just figured the guy who got the crap kicked out of him the worst usually lost.
    Good one!

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  • metalforlunch
    replied
    Thanks for the advice, you guys have been very helpful. My instructor has been giving me free aikido lessons, which is kinda cool but a little too passive for me to find much worth in it. It does seem to work better when people grab a hold of you on the wrists or lapels, but beyond that I'm not really loving it and it still isn't making me any better of a ground fighter, which was my original goal.

    Leave a comment:


  • TehDeadlyDimMak
    replied
    Point sparring in general tends to create horrible habits.

    Also, full contact sparring is good, but it's much much better when done against and under the supervision of people who are great at it. If you stop at a local boxing gym for example and spar with the regulars there I'm sure you'll have a much differenct experience than if you sparred with your regular buddies.

    Also, having a qualified coach that can point out things you're doing wrong does wonders. Qualifications aren't measured in how many dans are on their belts, but by their actual applied experience. Boxing matches, kickboxing matches, Jujitsu tournaments, blah blah blah.

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  • MacWombat
    replied
    That sounds pretty good actually. I can't confirm it unless you have videos, but from your descripition, not too shabby. You still may want to suplement it with other arts. I will not commnet on the quality of your striking or stand up grappling since I know nothing of the art, but from your own description it does seem to have a big hole in teh ground grappling department. Good styles for this are BJJ, Sambo, and submission wrestling. Of course studying any of the styles DimMak gave you will probably add greatly to your skill.

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  • metalforlunch
    replied
    General in class sparring is done with points, usually on a five point scale, untimed rounds with the first to 5 being the winner. That being said I can usually find two or three other people to spar with full contact, where things stop when someone has either been hit too hard to continue, or things go to the ground and someone gets submitted. Our instructors usually don't have much to do with that, so we just figured the guy who got the crap kicked out of him the worst usually lost.

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  • sidran
    replied
    Originally posted by metalforlunch
    I posted this elsewhere but they told me to post here, so anyways....
    Shaolin Kempo Karate. I've been training in it for about 5 and a half years, and although I rarely ever get into fights, I seem to be able to hold my own against people who are larger than me (I'm 5'8") and most of my friends who are martial artists. The past couple weeks though I've been reading about how it's the laughing stock of the martial arts world. That said, my instructor is a 7th dan and used to be a cop up in worcester Mass, and compared to other villaris schools and shaolin kempo schools who have students transfer to us, the training seems a lot more reality based (no crazy spinning shit in the middle of a technique, no trying to do 15 different moves to counter one punch, etc). His philosophy towards technique is also more of a "keep what feels comfortable, get rid of what doesn't" attitude. That said, I've been gaining more interest in harder styles such as kyokushin karate, muay thai, and jiujutsu. Can anybody here offer any insight into the downfalls of shaolin kempo and what might be a better style to consider training in?
    Sounds similar to my experience. Based on this, I think you're doing fine. One thing, though, you probably have sparring, but what kind? My Villari's school that I used to go to had sparring but it was stop-and-go point sparring, which can actually create bad habits if you focus too much on it. Do you spar continuous with contact? Even if you can get some in with good martial artists outside of class (remember, variety is good) it will be a good thing.

    Also, by harder styles, what do you mean? I consider jiujutsu a soft art more than anything. But though Shaolin Kempo Karate does have a jujutsu component, if you can find a good Brazilian Jiu Jitsu or Sambo school in the area, it would be a great supplement, and may help you improve in grappling at Shaolin Kempo Karate (since in my experience it focuses mainly on striking and stand-up grappling).

    EDIT: Wow, four posts while I was posting. Well, my comments still stand.

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