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Gene Simco "Essentials of Jiu-Jitsu" 4 DVD Set

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    Gene Simco "Essentials of Jiu-Jitsu" 4 DVD Set






    I feel I really need some additional help like this, since my training dojo has just started promoting its first "home grown" blue belts after a year and a half of operations. The students are hungering for intermediate and advanced instruction, and the days of getting "basics" at every class are probably long gone, unless they get another wave of beginners all at once.


    Another reason for getting the set is so my wife can drill basics with me. I won't have to try to drudge the details of each drill and position from my memory - she and I will be able to watch a clip together, then try out the moves to see how they fit together.


    (As a humorous aside, when I asked my wife to take the mount position last night so I could practice Upa and Shrimping and build up my strength against bodyweight resistance, she took her job way too seriously and fought like hell to keep me pinned down. Clearly she doesn't understand limits, boundaries, and drilling. :badgrin: On the other hand, maybe I should sign her up for real classes....)


    #2
    Originally posted by OldDog53
    [
    or it could be because he's a well-known fraud who doesn't have the skills to demonstrate anything else. go here and search his name if you need a laugh and have a few dozen hours to spare:

    http://www.jiujitsugear.com/forum/in...board,2.0.html

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      #3
      I've only seen one of his instructional DVD's (I Netflixed it). Sorry, I don't remember the name. I've got to say I hated it. If you've had a couple months in BJJ you would have seen everything on the DVD. That's not the problem, though. I know some people want to see the most basic techniques.

      What I hated was the way he said the same things over and over and over again, and constantly reiterated every little point. Damn, you can target beginners without treating them like morons. That's what makes DVD's so useful. If you didn't catch what he says, you can hit rewind. I got you the first time, Gene.

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        #4
        Simco.
        Ha.

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          #5
          Originally posted by devil
          [omitted text]

          What I hated was the way he said the same things over and over and over again, and constantly reiterated every little point. Damn, you can target beginners without treating them like morons. That's what makes DVD's so useful. If you didn't catch what he says, you can hit rewind. I got you the first time, Gene.
          This is a good point. Even on the sampler DVD that came with the book he tends to repeat a lot. On the other hand I want my wife and daughter to learn something from these DVD's too, so maybe it will work for me...when I get them and watch them I'll post back as to whether they were worthwhile or a waste of money which could have been better spent on extra classes or private lessons.

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            #6
            Burn it.

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              #7
              Much better choices out there...

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                #8
                Someone gave me their copy of Simco's first book before I did bjj. Should have been a clue to its worth. When my dog ate my expensive hapkido book (talk about a waste of money) I tried to get him to shred simco.

                He wouldn't touch it.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by OldDog53
                  on the sampler DVD that came with the book he tends to repeat a lot.
                  I couldn't get all the way through the DVD. He was so redundant.
                  I've also never seen a book with so many misspellings before either.




                  You're probably better off looking for something else.

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                    #10
                    Originally posted by Pollack
                    I couldn't get all the way through the DVD. He was so redundant. I've also never seen a book with so many misspellings before either.
                    and note that the photos are always arranged so that you can't see his belt ...

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                      #11
                      I find it distrubing that you commented your club doesnt' focus on basics now that there are blue belts. Our club has purples and blues and we still spend a TON of time on basics. Position drills, armbar drills, triangle drills, sweeps, etc. Sure it is boring as hell, but you get though it and keep your basics sharp and fresh. It's usually the blue and purple belts who are enjoying it the most. All of us white belts want to learn something 'cool'.
                      "a martial art that has no rules is nothing but violence" - Kenji Tomiki

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by FictionPimp
                        I find it distrubing that you commented your club doesnt' focus on basics now that there are blue belts. Our club has purples and blues and we still spend a TON of time on basics. Position drills, armbar drills, triangle drills, sweeps, etc. Sure it is boring as hell, but you get though it and keep your basics sharp and fresh. It's usually the blue and purple belts who are enjoying it the most. All of us white belts want to learn something 'cool'.
                        Good point, well taken. I haven't been there long enough to see a definite/consistent pattern, but so far there seems to be a lot of conditioning (up to 30 minutes), some drilling, and a lot of either rolling from a fixed start position, or rolling from knees. When there is drilling, it tends to start with one position and one move from that position, then some variants of that move.

                        Keep in mind that I am only going to one class a week right now, the busiest class, and there are about 9 other classes during the week (lunchtime, after work, evening) so for someone making all classes there probably is a lot of drilling, cumulatively, during the wek.

                        What I hope to get from the DVD's is an overview of the "most important skills" because right now it's going to take a long time, at one class per week, before I hit all the basics.

                        Of course in class they go into a lot more depth than I saw so far on the sampler DVD on any particular technique - variants, alternatives, counters - but I want to start out with at least a basic understanding of body position and basic moves so I have something to build on, and don't struggle to understand what's going on.

                        For example, in one class they taught escapes from knee on stomach, and they weren't too hard to follow, but in another class they taught how to reverse someone attacking your back while you were in turtle, and it was so hard to me to follow I had trouble even drilling it.

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by OldDog53
                          What I hope to get from the DVD's is an overview of the "most important skills" because right now it's going to take a long time, at one class per week, before I hit all the basics.

                          Of course in class they go into a lot more depth than I saw so far on the sampler DVD on any particular technique - variants, alternatives, counters - but I want to start out with at least a basic understanding of body position and basic moves so I have something to build on, and don't struggle to understand what's going on.

                          For example, in one class they taught escapes from knee on stomach, and they weren't too hard to follow, but in another class they taught how to reverse someone attacking your back while you were in turtle, and it was so hard to me to follow I had trouble even drilling it.
                          finding complex technique confusing at first is just part of the process, at least at most BJJ schools. you're not necessarily expected to absorb it fully the first time you see it (or even the second or third, sometimes)--but eventually you'll get the hang of it. training more than once a week will make a big difference in your progress; if you can fit in even one more class a week, I'd strongly recommend it. keeping a training log & recording the details of each technique while it's still fresh in your mind can also be a big help.

                          I haven't seen Simco's DVDs, but given his shady rep, I have a hard time imagining they're any good. I can vouch for Roy Harris' BJJ 101 series; he's the real thing, and if you buy from him you won't be supporting a fraud.

                          http://www.royharris.biz/catalog/c1_p1.html

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by G8
                            [part of quote omitted].... I can vouch for Roy Harris' BJJ 101 series; he's the real thing, and if you buy from him you won't be supporting a fraud.

                            http://www.royharris.biz/catalog/c1_p1.html
                            I just ordered his new BJJ Over 40 DVD. It sounds like just what the doctor ordered. One of his stated goals is to teach us (the old but roll minority) how to reduce the number and fequency of injuries so we can take more classes. Sounds good to me. :5yeah:

                            My biggest problem with age in not strength or cardio (I almost have those where I need them). It's healing rate.

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                              #15
                              BJJ Over 40 is mostly focused on ways to conserve energy while rolling. It's well worth the $$ IMO.

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