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    #16










    it amazes me how naive people are fascinated by a bunch of bald headed dweebs who have enough time on thier hands to Observe Crickettes an then mimick thier movements to "develop" kung fu styles










    Compliant Partner Dummies......taking the "aliveness" out of MA training since the invention of toilet tissue

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      #17
      Originally posted by DJR
      I haven't read that chin-na book, so I can't comment on it, but the author is a Judo blackbelt and teaches at the Vancouver Police Department Judo club. He also worked as a cop in the downtown eastide of Vancouver (a very fucked up area, for those not familiar) for a couple of decades.

      http://www.city.vancouver.bc.ca/poli...Judo/photo.htm

      He also taught at a kung-fu place that has produced high calibre sanshou fighters (despite all the taichi wackiness, etc) :

      http://www.shouyuliang.com/instructo...rsenault.shtml
      Still its not as good as of book as I thought it to be. Yes, they show some basic judo chokes and takedowns, but there is a whole chapter designated to the D3ADLY PR3SSURE POINTS.

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        #18
        i have that chin na book -_-

        its not *that* bad, and overcomplicates things, but at its core it still makes since. can someone explain to me how a wrist lock works at all? where did this wrist lock stuff come from, like yea it hurts to be in a wrist lock like in those rediculous pictures but your not at the mercy of the guy, you can still punch him in the face.

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          #19
          Blargh! Huge pictures melting brain!
          "Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin to slit throats." H.L. Mencken

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            #20


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              #21
              Originally posted by TehStr33t
              Still its not as good as of book as I thought it to be. Yes, they show some basic judo chokes and takedowns, but there is a whole chapter designated to the D3ADLY PR3SSURE POINTS.
              I wonder if all the pressure point, wristlock stuff (which I agree is useless in a fight), is maybe useful in police work? Like when you more or less already have control of the person, but want to stop them flailing around or get their attention.

              The author of that book is a cop who worked for years in an area where he would have had to deal with a lot of crack-heads, junkies and otherwise messed up people, so maybe stuff like this could be useful in those sorts of situations?

              Then again, the book very well may be just another ploy to syphon money from sinophile LARPers who have watched too many kung-fu flicks...

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                #22
                FUCKING LEARN HOW TO SIZE PICS!

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                  #23
                  that book written by the cop really isnt that bad. if you sift through some of it. what i dont like is they talk about all these like wrist holds and arm holds, from these different positions on the ground, and its like how the f**** do you expect to get into that position in teh first place. i think its more a book about showing concepts of vulnerable joints and points on the body, and how to work them, its definately not meant to teach you ground fighting, or to be used as like a text book. like the you can give a man a fish and he can eat for a day, or you can teach him how to fish and he can eat for the rest of his life kind of thing. the book is good at showing the concept of control on teh ground, and what to look for and how to manipulate it, dont get caught up in its BS diagrams and pages of just implausability. i wont start jiu jitsu till sometime next monty after i get my new apt, in my jkd class only the advance students are really doing grappling stuff, im doing basic punches kicks applied to wing chun and a ton of footwork, but as someone who wants to get a glimpse of what ground fighting is like this book is not so bad. theres a better book called Guard, which is all about being in the guard position on your back written by these two royce gracie students thats really good.

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                    #24
                    And now to put this thread back on topic:

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                      #25
                      eh i was just justifying my purchase of that book. it kind of sucks

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by GRAB MY WRIST
                        It seems that you are trying to communicate in English.

                        1) Would you like to consult a dictionary?
                        2) Learn it from a certified/trained English teacher?
                        3) Kill yourself?

                        GMW.
                        Are you saying that I actually have a purpose?

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                          #27
                          Many of those work just fine for a situation with less-than-total resistance, like chucking somebody out of a party or snuffing out aggression as somebody's starting to talk themselves up into a fight. I've used the one in the REALLY BIG PICTURE for that.

                          In this cases you want standing options because it's a fucking pain to take someone down when the whole point is to make them leave the area.

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Vulgar42Ox
                            that book written by the cop really isnt that bad. if you sift through some of it. what i dont like is they talk about all these like wrist holds and arm holds, from these different positions on the ground, and its like how the f**** do you expect to get into that position in teh first place. i think its more a book about showing concepts of vulnerable joints and points on the body, and how to work them, its definately not meant to teach you ground fighting, or to be used as like a text book. like the you can give a man a fish and he can eat for a day, or you can teach him how to fish and he can eat for the rest of his life kind of thing.
                            *DING-DING-DING*
                            Somebody gets it...we have a winner, ladies and gentleman.

                            I remember saying this before. Chin Na is the scientific study of CONCEPTS of manipulating biomechanics through joint locks. Not everything shown is literally an applicable move, but it's more of a play on the biomechanics so that you're "at home" with real applications that come with resistance. You're conditioned to the idea to where it becomes second nature. Ironically, real applications are easier, it's just applying them on a resisting opponent that's difficult.

                            Think of Chin Na as reverse engineering the human body. I mean, after awhile, the playing becomes pointless and you DO need to apply it in an alive fashion (which realistically cuts down the arsenal toward what works and doesn't work in a fighting situation). However, going this route by studying the biomechanics is what also instills creativity in an alive situation. So it's not always about performing an armbar or triangle choke alone. But now you're able to understand the play mechanics of how to do this and do that without thinking about it. You're already naturally aware of what hurts and what doesn't hurt, etc.

                            Yes, this goes for the top and bottom regions of the human body *duh*.

                            Chin Na's only serious flaw is that not enough attention is paid to the ground aspect by its practitioners [realistically]. Which funny enough, is where most of the more complicated techniques are more efficient, thanks to ground-gravity leverage. I mean, they have the joint lock knowledge, but zero knowledge in positioning skills, which is the core HEART of ground fighting.

                            Well that and the fact that most of the practitioners don't play techniques with alive resistance most of the time.

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                              #29
                              Originally posted by Fearless Ukemi
                              And now to put this thread back on topic:

                              That looks like the Systema dude...the non-fat one.

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