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Help on deciding on a MA.

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  • pauli
    replied
    50% of the increased cost go to keep the great god helio's disembodied floating head in action, and the other 50% helps fund rorion's attempts to let us know that no matter what happens, gracie jiu-jitsu wins - because of gracie jiu-jitsu. (gracie jiu-jitsu)

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  • IzzyDaHedgehog
    replied
    Originally posted by Agis Silverfish
    Well, madam, you sure know how to fight!

    Uncanny Sage: What's the difference between GJJ and BJJ? I thought they were more or less the same.
    Gracie Jiu-Jitsu is more expensive.

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  • Agis Silverfish
    replied
    Originally posted by AnnaTrocity
    Because I'm a competitive kickboxer that doesnt really kick very often. Maybe once or twice a round if that.
    Well, madam, you sure know how to fight!

    Uncanny Sage: What's the difference between GJJ and BJJ? I thought they were more or less the same.

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  • UncannySage
    replied
    Excuse me, I meant GJJ (Gracie Jiu-Jitsu). And it has never been an issue with either knee. The throwing (hip throwing mostly) is totally a non issue with their methods. You'd likely also find the ground techniques surprisingly easy on you knees as well.

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  • Anna Kovacs
    replied
    Plus i'm sure if you tell dudes in BJJ "hey, don't kneebar/heel hook/etc this leg" then it wouldnt be an issue.

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  • MONGO
    replied
    BJJ is not nearly as stressful on your knees as Judo. I don't even need my knee brace now...........

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  • Torakaka
    replied
    personally I'd be a little worried about doing boxing with a jacked knee. Sure, you don't have the kicks to worry about, but there IS a lot of legwork involved. There've been times when I've had a tweaked knee and just working my boxing footwork put too much lateral stress on the knee joint. Of course try it out and see how your knee feels, but don't go in there thinking it'll be something that puts no stress on the knee.

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  • Anna Kovacs
    replied
    Originally posted by Agis Silverfish
    By the way, what has Annatrocity have to do with my loony idea of no-kicks-kickboxing? :)

    Because I'm a competitive kickboxer that doesnt really kick very often. Maybe once or twice a round if that.

    I'm really just a boxer that likes to clinch, knee, and throw people and elbow them. (though it's a pain in the ass finding matches where elbows are legal).

    It's kind of a shame really and I am considering trying to change that a bit because when I do decide to kick I can kick fucking hard so I probably really should capitalize on it.

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  • Einar Fridgeirs
    replied
    BJJ all the way. Why? My instructor got into BJJ after blowing out his knee doing Judo. He usually spars off the knees (no takedowns) or starts in an inferior position on the ground. Ground grappling is much easier on the knees than standup grappling, he did one tourney where he went hard grappling standing and blew out his knee again(go figure).

    If you just want to do a MA for fun and fitness and not self defence without doing something totally ineffective, I would think that BJJ starting from the knees/ground would be the perfect match. You are still learning something you can actually use, although there will be holes in your game obviously, without unduely jeapordizing your knee.

    BJJ plus some boxing is probably the best bet, although boxers can and do blow out their knees too once in a while, proper boxing footwork, pivoting and twisting can be hard on the legs.

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  • chaosexmachina
    replied
    Your English is pretty good! I didn't detect any oddities...

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  • Southpaw
    replied
    Originally posted by jnp
    Speaking as a guy who's needed knee surgery for a few years now I think BJJ is less dangerous than most hard sparring stand up arts. Provided you find a dojo that has experienced guys who are not trying to take everyone's head (or knee) off everytime they step out onto the mat. IME most legitimate BJJ places do not do this.
    You are probably right...and since I've only been doing formally training BJJ for a month or so now...I will certainly defer to your experience.

    Though I figured given the amount of time spent on the knees (in one way or another), it seemed like it would be tough w/ that kind of injury.

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  • jnp
    replied
    Originally posted by Amp
    BJJ is great but it would be tough w/ a injured knee.

    If you are seriouly interested in self defense, but have a nagging injury, learn how to use a knife and a gun.
    Speaking as a guy who's needed knee surgery for a few years now I think BJJ is less dangerous than most hard sparring stand up arts. Provided you find a dojo that has experienced guys who are not trying to take everyone's head (or knee) off everytime they step out onto the mat. IME most legitimate BJJ places do not do this.

    Amp's second statement in the above quote is the best advice so far in this thread.

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  • Southpaw
    replied
    Wing chun is excellent if you find a good teacher. The trick is, finding one. They are few and far betwee. Don't listen to Backdraft, he takes it in the backdoor.

    BJJ is great but it would be tough w/ a injured knee.

    Forget kickboxing if you knee is bad...look into boxing.

    Forget Kendo.

    If you are seriouly interested in self defense, but have a nagging injury, learn how to use a knife and a gun.

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  • Agis Silverfish
    replied

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  • UncannySage
    replied
    Hi there.

    I've trained a wide variety of styles all with substantial knee injuries (ACL tears in both knees). I currently train in GGJ just fine with no problems from either knee.

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