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How long 'till Chi-Sao?

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  • MercyBeat
    replied
    A. But never more then 10 mins at a time in a day.

    Hey, I like ChiSau. I believe it has its merits. Teaching sensitivty and maintaining bridge. I do it after more realistic drills. It's also not bad before sparring.

    BUT....

    One of the Wing Chun "linages" is from a theater troop called "Red Boat" ( think thats right). If i was in a theater troop and wanted to make a fight on the stage look real. Well ChiSau LopSau would do the job nicely.

    Now I know nothing... So all you Wing Chun Sifu Super fighters just back down...

    Leave a comment:


  • Mars
    replied
    Originally posted by Shuma-Gorath
    Hopefully you never start chi sao because you avoid wing chun like a smart person.
    I agree.

    My answer to the question is A, but I should also add that I was wasting my time with all that slap boxing crud. When it came down to real fighting what I did was more like kick boxing and wrestling....

    Leave a comment:


  • Tom Kagan
    replied
    Originally posted by Dagon Akujin
    Oh come on Tom! I'm quite curious how it happened back in the olden days, and whether or not I'm an idiot. :eusa_pray

    Dagon (F)

    Back in the olden days, we ChiSao'ed to and from school uphill both ways.



    Whether or not you are an idiot should be self apparent. You don't need me to confirm or deny it.



    :smile:

    Leave a comment:


  • Dagon Akujin
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr._Tzun_Tzu
    Whats Chi Sau?

    Seriously, its a pretty vauge term.
    I purposely left this very vague. It may be worth people saying what their "chi sao" is like though, since I realize that different places have different ideas about what constitutes it.

    The school I'm at starts Tsui Mah (horse-moving) at around 9 months. The purpose is to move the other person back, either by punching them or by pressing into their structure. Basically, if your structure isn't good enough on it's own, you get hit. This is where we start our "hit training". A part of Tsui Mah is called "ragdoll", where you don't even put your hands up, you just get punched to get moved back. It's fun! *cough cough*

    Tsui Mah is like Chi Sao, but without trapping or moving to the side. Sometimes only one person is moving in or attacking (though defender can counter if they find an opening), sometimes both are. It's the first drill that is mainly non-compliant, as there are no set patterns (besides the roll), and you can experiment a bit. Teaches you structure, how to move in your structure, how to move the other person's structure, and how to get your structure moved without losing it.

    Chi Sao then is a bit more "free-for-all" for a drill. It is not compliant in any way. You are free to test out things and see what does and does not work, though doing so within the guidelines of proper technique will normally be recommended.

    You typically learn by going "Oh, that's how you were able to elbow me in the throat and trip me, I shouldn't do that". You typically won't be shown "Ok, this is how you can do that." You are also supposed to start using traps and trying to score multiple hits. You "follow" your opponent after the first hit, driving them back with each punch and keeping them pinned at the same time. Of course, you might want to try sweeping them, twisting their structure, etc., but punching them straight in the chest a few times is normally how it comes out.

    Finally, it is better to get "beaten" and maintain good structure/technique than it is to "get away" or "win?" by using bad technique. It's still not a contest, as getting punched in the throat can greatly improve your kung-fu. :eng101:

    Originally posted by Tom Kagan
    Fook'em if they can't take a Juht.
    Oh come on Tom! I'm quite curious how it happened back in the olden days, and whether or not I'm an idiot. :eusa_pray

    Dagon (F)

    Leave a comment:


  • MrMcFu
    replied
    I think the real question you need to ask yourself should be:

    Is wing chun hereditary?

    Leave a comment:


  • Shuma-Gorath
    replied
    Hopefully you never start chi sao because you avoid wing chun like a smart person.

    Leave a comment:


  • Southpaw
    replied
    If you people don't see the relationship between learning single hand chi sao and leanring the SLT form...holy shit...you are fucked.

    Seriously...change your schools NOW!

    For the love of God.

    Fucking killing me.

    If you don't learn proper pressure (i.e. chi sao)...when you learn the SLT form...you are simply mimicing arm motions.

    Jesus Christ.

    You should all quit WC immediatly.

    Fuck.

    Leave a comment:


  • baqi9
    replied
    It took me about a year with me being the only student two days a week for 4 to 6 hour class time...sounds crazy to shoot right in to it on the first class, but hey to each his own way.

    Leave a comment:


  • Oscar Goldman
    replied
    Chi Sau started in green sash - at least a year.

    When I started there 10 years ago it was in blue sash which took about 4 months to get to. When I returned after my 6 year break, they had moved a bunch of stuff to later in the curriculum.

    I'm guessing they were losing too many students when they had to do something harder than compliant drills and one-step sparring, more revenue per customer if you can keep them busy for a year or so.

    Same reason they don't spar except for brown and black sash testing - punching scares paying customers away.

    This was weird non-classical WC though. We didn't have any forms and did Chi Sau with full forward pressure, more like JKD trapping or something. I don't know how this compares to other _ing _un.

    Leave a comment:


  • Astrosmurf
    replied
    Single after maybe 4-5 months, Double after 12-24 months

    Leave a comment:


  • Zendetta
    replied
    Originally posted by Dr._Tzun_Tzu
    Do you really mean how long untill you get Poon Sau?
    lol - he said 'Poon'.

    Sticky hands indeed.

    Leave a comment:


  • Southpaw
    replied
    Single hand should start in the first few classes...it accompanies learning the 1st form.

    Leave a comment:


  • namaste
    replied
    I went two/three times a week for a solid year with private lessons for the last six months and i never even got into the double hand chi sau stance once.

    just so many hours of siu nim tao and shingyi bullshit.

    Leave a comment:


  • Rhamma
    replied
    Originally posted by Duke_of_Pain
    Poon Sau sounds so awesome! Here is a great example of some WC lingo with extremely terrible spelling, forgive my engrish:

    'I got some poon sau last night, and I lop saud my tongue sau into her poon sau for hours until she pak saud my ju jong.'

    Yeah, I rule!!! Who else has got some WC lingo?
    ROTFLMAO!

    I was thinking along those lines.

    I stuck my Chi Sausage into her Poon Sau! :new_popco

    Leave a comment:


  • amichaell
    replied
    At my school you begin single within the first couple of classes. Double begins after three to four months.

    Leave a comment:

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